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© Red Sector

THE ULTIMATE EXAMINING UTILITY V2.8 by Richard Karsmakers

Originally  published  in ST NEWS Volume 1 Issue  5,  launched  on 
October 5th 1986.

In  the  previous  issue of ST NEWS,  you might  remember  that  I 
promised "The Ultimate Examining Utility".  Well,  it took a  long 
time but it's finally finished. I might say it took quite a while, 
and  I  am  a bit disappointed in myself for  not  being  able  to 
include  the following options:  Sector Examine (so all   sectors, 
and not just the boot sector), Get BIOS Parameter Block and Format 
Track.  My original plan was to include a monitor/disassembler  as 
well, but I couldn't do that either.
But  it wasn't meant as a superb utility in the first  place,  but 
more  as  an example of how to work with GfA Basic on  a  somewhat 
higher level.  You will find the program listing down here,  while 
there's also a working version of the program supplied on the disk 
with this issue of ST NEWS.

If  you have any questions with regard to "The Ultimate  Examining 
Utility"  Version  2.8,  I  hereby ask you to  send  them  to  our 
correspondence  address.  Please  add a stamp  (or,  if  you  live 
outside  of  Holland,  an International Reply Coupon)  so  we  can 
answer your question(s).

A remark for people who like disk manipulation:  Remember that the 
positions  of  bytes  in the boot sector  starts  counting  at  0, 
whereas  the MID$ command starts at 1.  That's why I  define  each 
MID$ one higher 'as normal'!

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.