Skip to main content
© Bitman

 "There is no future in time travel."

                YOUR SECOND GFA BASIC 3.XX MANUAL
                             - or -
        HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING AND LOVE GFA-BASIC
                             PART 10
                  CHAPTER NINE - SCREEN OUTPUT
                          by Han Kempen

CLS

 It's not necessary to use CLS as one of the first commands in an
interpreted  program,  because  the interpreter  executes  a  CLS
automatically. But it's not a bad idea to use CLS anyway, just in
case you decide to compile your program later.

PRINT

 It  is very important to know if PRINT will be used on  the  so-
called  TOS-screen  (no windows opened),  or  in  a  window.  TOS
emulates the VT52-terminal of Digital Equipment,  so if you PRINT
on  the  TOS-screen,   the  VT52-codes  will  be  interpreted  as
commands. But in a window these codes are printed as characters!

 Actually I prefer to use the TOS-screen,  but if you're thinking
(and  programming) big you should avoid the TOS-screen and  stick
to   windows.   Do  your  thing  inside  a   window,   so   other
programs/accessories  will not be affected.  A 'CLS' on the  TOS-
screen might not be a good idea after all.

 In both High and Medium resolution you can PRINT 25 lines of  80
characters,  but in Low resolution it's 25 lines of 40 characters
only.

 Normally you can't PRINT a character at position (80,25) in High
or Medium resolution,  or at (40,25) in Low resolution.  Try  the
following:

     PRINT AT(80,25);"X";

 and you will see that a linefeed is executed  automatically,  in
spite of the semicolon after "X". On the TOS-screen you can put a
character at this position by using the VT52-command 'wrap off':

     PRINT AT(80,25);"*wX";    ! * = <Esc> (use Alternate-method)

 After 'Esc w' the linefeed is suppressed.  If you PRINT a string
that  doesn't fit on the current line,  the remaining  characters
are either printed on the next line ('Esc v',  the default in the
interpreter,  not in a compiled program), or discarded ('Esc w').
After 'Esc w' all characters up to the first CHR$(10) or CHR$(13)
are  discarded,  except the very last character which  is  always
printed at column 80 (in High or Medium resolution).

 It's impossible to PRINT characters with ASCII-code 0-31 on  the
TOS-screen. However, you can print any character with:

     OUT 5,code          ! if necessary, use LOCATE first

 After opening a window (OPENW x) the command DEFTEXT will change
size  and colour of PRINTed text as well!  One advantage is  that
you can now PRINT in different colours on the screen.

 On  the TOS-screen,  all PRINTed text has the same  colour.  The
colour  is determined by VDI colour-index 1 and is also used  for
the Alert-box and the Fileselector.  The background on the screen
is determined by VDI colour-index 0.  This colour is used by  the
CLS-command.  Read  the  paragraph 'SETCOLOR  and  VSETCOLOR'  in
chapter 20 for more information about the use of colours.

 It  is possible to PRINT in different colours on the  TOS-screen
by  using the VT52-code 'Esc b'.  The background of PRINTed  text
can  be  changed with VT52-code 'Esc c'.  Use  the  following  to
experiment:

  PRINT CHR$(27);"b";CHR$(color);" Watch the letter-colour "
  PRINT CHR$(27);"c";CHR$(color);" Watch the background-colour "

 Use   the  SETCOLOR-table  from  the  paragraph  'SETCOLOR   and
VSETCOLOR'  or  be  prepared  to  become  very  frustrated.   And
remember,  the VT52-codes have to be PRINTed to become effective.
Note  the spaces at beginning and end of the string to  emphasize
the text-colour against the background-colour.

 In order to catch the eye of the user in High resolution you can
PRINT reverse on the TOS-screen:

     PRINT "this is *p IMPORTANT *q"    ! * = <Esc>

 Enter the Escape-character in the usual way  (Alternate-method).
Note  again the extra space both before and after the  word  that
should stand out. Of course you could also use CHR$(27):

     PRINT "this is ";CHR$(27);"p IMPORTANT ";CHR$(27);"q"

 More difficult to read in the editor, but easier to Llist.

 If you use a comma with PRINT,  the cursor will jump to the next
tabulator-stop.  Tab-stops are at position 1,  17, 33, 49 and 65.
Try  the  following  to  see  what I  mean  (in  High  or  Medium
resolution):

     PRINT "1","17","33","49","65","1","17"

 If  you  use the comma after the last tab-stop,  a  linefeed  is
executed  and the cursor jumps to the first tab-stop on the  next
line.
 The  easiest way to use double quotes is by using double  double
quotes (read this twice to make sure you understand it):

     PRINT "double quotes printed the ""easy"" way"

 In a DATA-line a single double quote suffices:

     READ t$
     PRINT t$
     DATA "look Ma, "double quotes" again"

 By the way,  in a DATA-line you can't use a comma after a double
quote  and  you have to use double quotes if there  are  trailing
spaces:

     DATA "after "double quotes" , always insert a space before
       the comma"
     DATA You don't need double quotes here at all.
     DATA "With trailing space-characters you do need double
       quotes      "

LOCATE

 The syntax of PRINT AT and LOCATE is now less confusing:

     PRINT AT(column,line)
     LOCATE column,line

 In  older  versions of GFA-Basic it  was  'LOCATE  line,column'.
Check  this if you run an old program and text is PRINTed on  the
wrong place.

PRINT USING

 I  keep forgetting that it's not possible to use a dash  in  the
format-string of PRINT USING:

     PRINT USING "VDI-index ##",i       ! looks innocent enough

 The  dash is seen as the negative sign,  but  the  error-message
you'll get is usually not very helpful.  Precede the dash with an
underscore:

     PRINT USING "VDI_-index ##",i      ! should work now

PRINT TAB

 Don't  use PRINT TAB with a position greater than 255.  Try  the
following in High or Medium resolution:

     FOR i=0 TO 30
       PRINT TAB(i*20);i;
     NEXT i

 Because  TAB  uses one byte for the position,  you  get  strange
results  if the position is greater than 255.  One way  to  solve
this problem is:

     PRINT TAB(MOD(i*20,80));i;         ! do use semicolons

 You can combine TAB with PRINT AT and with PRINT USING:

     PRINT AT(1,1);"1";TAB(40);"40"
     PRINT TAB(40);USING "##",40

Setscreen (XBIOS 5)

 With XBIOS 5 (Setscreen) it is possible to change the resolution
from  Low to Medium and from Medium to  Low.  Unfortunately,  GEM
ignores the switch,  so GEM-commands (e.g. ALERT, TEXT, MOUSE) do
not  work  properly!  But  you could change from  Low  to  Medium
resolution  to show text on the TOS-screen with PRINT (and  VT52-
commands).   Most  users  will  be  grateful  for  the   improved
readability of the text:

     ~XBIOS(5,L:-1,L:-1,1)    ! switch from Low to Medium
     (...)                    ! print text in Medium resolution
     ~XBIOS(5,L:-1,L:-1,0)    ! and go back to Low

 If you change the resolution, the VT52-emulator is automatically
initialised.  You'll  probably have to adjust the palette  before
you can read the text without sun-glasses.  Don't forget to  save
and restore the old palette.

 XBIOS  5  is very useful if you would like to draw on  a  screen
before showing it to the user.  Drawing on an "invisible"  screen
is  indeed  possible,  because  the  operating  system  uses  two
screens:  the  physical screen (visible on your monitor) and  the
logical  screen (usually,  but not necessarily,  the same as  the
physical screen).  All graphical (GEM-)com-mands,  including  the
TEXT-command, are always sent to the logical screen. But TOS will
send  the  first PRINT-command to  the  physical  screen,  unless
you've opened a window. That's a bug. Just send one PRINT and all
the  following  PRINT-commands are properly sent to  the  logical
screen.  If the address of logical and physical screen is not the
same,  you have your invisible screen. The address of the logical
screen  must be a multiple of 256.  You could use  the  invisible
screen for fluid animations:

     DIM screen.2|(32255)               ! reserve space for
                                                  screen.2
     screen.2%=VARPTR(screen.2|(0))
     screen.2%=AND(ADD(screen.2%,255),&HFFFFFF00) ! multiple of
                                                  256
     screen.1%=XBIOS(2)                 ! physical screen
     ~XBIOS(5,L:screen.2%,L:-1,-1)      ! invisible screen.2 is
                                                  now active
     (...)                              ! draw on invisible
                                                  screen
     SWAP screen.1%,screen.2%
     VSYNC                                   ! avoid flash
     ~XBIOS(5,L:screen.2%,L:screen.1%,-1)    ! swap the screens
     (...)
     ~XBIOS(5,L:XBIOS(2),L:XBIOS(2),-1)      ! restore original
                                                  setting

 On  some ST-computers XBIOS 5 does not function  properly  after
installation  of a RAM-disk.  In that case you could  change  the
address  of  the  logical screen  by  using  the  system-variable
screenpt (at &H45E):

     VSYNC
     SLPOKE &H45E,adr%        ! system-variable screenpt

 XBIOS 5 is suitable for screen-swapping on a 'regular'  ST,  but
will  probably  not  work  if  you  have  installed  a   graphics
extension-board.  In  that case you should also  avoid:  XBIOS  2
(Physbase), 3 (Logbase), 4 (Getrez), 6 (Setpalette), 7 (Setcolor)
and 33 (Setscreen).

Animation

 In  the  previous  paragraph  you could read  that  XBIOS  5  is
suitable for animations.  There are several ways to implement  an
animation, here are some ideas. The basic idea is the following:

    - create object and mask
    - perform first animation
    - start animation-loop

 1.  Create  a  GET-string of the object that will  be  animated.
     Sometimes the object is called a sprite, although a 'proper'
     sprite is limited to 16x16 pixels (see paragraph 'SPRITE' in
     chapter  20).  Here we'll use the more flexible  GET-string.
     All  pixels that do not belong to the object must  have  the
     background  colour (VDI colour-index 0).  The pixels of  the
     object  itself  may have any colour(s),  except  0.  If  the
     object itself is static (the static object moves around  the
     screen), you'll need only one object-string, e.g.:

          CLS
          DEFFILL 1,1
          PCIRCLE d/2,d/2,d/2      ! d = diameter of circle
          GET 0,0,d,d,object$      ! black disk on white
                                        background

     If  the  object  itself  should  be  animated,  you'll  need
     different  object-strings  for each 'frame' of  the  object-
     animation.
 2.  Create  a mask of the object.  This is necessary because  if
     you simply put the object on the screen, the background will
     be  destroyed.  The mask is needed to stamp a 'hole' in  the
     background  that  has the exact form of the object  (in  our
     case  a disk).  All pixels in the mask that correspond  with
     the  object should have the background-colour  (VDI  colour-
     index 0).  All pixels that do not correspond with the object
     (in  our case everything outside the disk) should  have  VDI
     colour-index 1 (that's SETCOLOR-index 3 in Medium and 15  in
     Low resolution). In our case we need:

          CLS
          BOUNDARY 0
          DEFFILL 1,1
          PBOX 0,0,d,d             ! black square
          DEFFILL 0,1
          PCIRCLE d/2,d/2,d/2      ! stamp out white disk
          GET 0,0,d,d,mask$        ! white disk on black
                                        background

     A PUT-action with object$ in the proper PUT-mode could  also
     be used to create the mask.

 3.  Prepare  an  invisible logical screen (as described  in  the
     paragraph   'Setscreen')  and  fill  with   an   interesting
     background.

 4.  Determine  the  coordinates (x1,y1) where  the  object  will
     appear and save the background under the object:

          GET x1,y1,x1+d,y1+d,back$

     This  is not necessary if the background  is  scrolling.  In
     that  case you would first draw a completely new  background
     before you continue with step 5.

 5.  Put the mask on the invisible screen:

          PUT x1,y1,mask$,1        ! mode 1

     The mask has stamped out a 'hole' for the object.

 6.  Put the object on the invisible screen:

          PUT x1,y1,object$,7      ! mode 7

     All  pixels  outside  the object  (our  disk)  retain  their
     original colour.

 7.  Swap screens to show the result. Swapping screens with XBIOS
     5  (including  a VSYNC to prevent blinking) is  faster  than
     BMOVEing the complete logical screen to the physical screen.
     On the other hand,  the animation-loop is simpler if you use
     BMOVE (see step 8).  Test both methods to determine which is
     the fastest in your situation.

 8.  Restore the invisible screen. After swapping the two screens
     the current invisible screen is the screen that a moment ago
     was visible on the monitor.  Unless you are going to restore
     the  entire  background (only necessary  if  the  background
     scrolls),  you'll  have to restore the  previous  animation-
     screen:

          PUT x0,y0,previous.back$

     Of  course there is no previous animation-screen  after  the
     first animation (step 4 to 7).  You could check this in  the
     animation-loop,   but  it's  easier  to  perform  the  first
     animation outside the animation-loop.  If you used BMOVE  in
     step 7 you restore the invisible logical screen (the current
     animation-screen) with:

          PUT x1,y1,back$

     Then you would repeat the animation-loop by going to step 4.

 9.  Store   the  current  coordinates  of  the  object  on   the
     animation-screen  (now  visible  on  the  monitor)  and  the
     background on that screen:

          x0=x1
          y0=y1
          SWAP previous.back$,back$

10.  Repeat the animation-loop: go to step 4.

 Take care not to PUT anything outside the screenborders.  You'll
have to check yourself because CLIP has no effect on PUT.

 For  a scrolling background you could restrict yourself  to  one
screen:  what  scrolls off on one side reappears on the  opposite
side.  A  horizontal  scroll-effect  could  be  implemented  with
GET/PUT or with RC_COPY.  Vertical scrolls with BMOVE are  faster
than horizontal scrolls (early games on the ST featured  vertical
scrolling only).  Another idea would be to create a long vertical
strip  of  several screens in MALLOCated memory and to  move  the
appropriate  background  to the invisible screen  (step  4)  with
BMOVE.

Font

 TOS has three built-in systemfonts.  The default PRINT-font  for
High resolution is the 8x16 font (equals DEFTEXT ,,,13 for TEXT),
while  the 8x8 font (equals DEFTEXT ,,,6) is used in  Medium  and
Low resolution. You can switch between these two fonts:

     a$=MKI$(&HA000)+MKI$(&H2009)+MKI$(&H4E75)
     adr%=VARPTR(a$)
     adr%=C:adr%()         ! address of font-table
     {INTIN}={adr%+8}      ! pointer to 8x16 systemfont
     VDISYS 5,2,0,102      ! install 8x16 font as systemfont
     '
     a$=MKI$(&HA000)+MKI$(&H2009)+MKI$(&H4E75)
     adr%=VARPTR(a$)
     adr%=C:adr%()         ! address of font-table
     {INTIN}={adr%+4}      ! pointer to 8x8 systemfont
     VDISYS 5,2,0,102      ! install 8x8 font as systemfont

 The third font (6x6) is used for icons,  but for some reason can
not become the current systemfont. The VDI-function seems to work
only  with  fonts containing characters of width  8  pixels.  The
function  (VDI  5,  Escape 102) is not officially  documented  by
Atari (?).

 You  can replace the systemfont by a font that has been  created
with  'Fontkit' or 'Fontkit Plus' by Jeremy Hughes (e.g.  a  4114
byte A1_xxxxx.FON file for High resolution):

     '  load an 8x16 A1_xxxxx.FON file (4114 bytes) here
     INLINE new.font%,4114
     '
     adr%=L~A-22                        ! V_FNT_AD
     normal.font%={adr%}                ! remember current
                                             systemfont
     SLPOKE adr%,new.font%              ! install new font
     (...)                              ! PRINT with new font
     SLPOKE L~A-22,normal.font%         ! restore original
                                             systemfont

 A  font-table for a High resolution 8x16 font  occupies  exactly
4096 bytes (16 bytes/character,  256 characters).  A FONTKIT-font
usually has a name attached at the end, that's why I reserve 4114
bytes.  TOS  ignores the name completely,  it's only used by  the
accessory FONSEL.ACC or FSWITCH4.ACC.  You can load any 4096-byte
8x16 font in the INLINE-line,  you don't even have to change 4114
into 4096. Although you lose 18 bytes if you don't.

 The  new systemfont is only used by PRINT,  not by  TEXT.  After
installing   GDOS  you  can  load  a  new  font  for  TEXT   with
VST_LOAD_FONTS,  but  it's  also possible to install a  new  font
without using GDOS:

     ' load two 8x16 fonts (A1_BAULI.FON and A1_MED.FON) here:
     INLINE a1_bauli%,4184
     INLINE a1_med%,4184
     '
     n.fonts=2                           ! 2 fonts
    DIM newfont.adr%(PRED(n.fonts)),newheader.adr%(PRED(n.fonts))
     newfont.adr%(0)=a1_bauli%           ! font no. 2
     newfont.adr%(1)=a1_med%             ! font no. 3
     header.adr%={L~A-906}               ! address of systemfont-
                                                  header
     font.adr%={header.adr%+76}          ! address of systemfont
     FOR i=0 TO PRED(n.fonts)
       newheader.adr%(i)=newfont.adr%(i)+4096  ! put header
                                         behind font
       {header.adr%+84}=newheader.adr%(i)      ! address of next
                                         header
       BMOVE header.adr%,newheader.adr%(i),88  ! copy old header
       WORD{newheader.adr%(i)}=i+2             ! font-number
       {newheader.adr%(i)+76}=newfont.adr%(i)  ! font-address
       WORD{newheader.adr%(i)+66}=12           ! bit 0 in flag
       header.adr%=newheader.adr%(i)           ! address of font-
                                        header
     NEXT i
     {header.adr%+84}=0                   ! there is no next
                                         header

 After  installing  the two fonts,  you can  activate  them  with
DEFTEXT:

     DEFTEXT ,,,,2       ! font no. 2 active (A1_BAULI)
     DEFTEXT ,,,,3       ! font no. 3 active (A1_MED)
     DEFTEXT ,,,,1       ! original systemfont (no. 1) active
                                    again

 Don't  do  this if GDOS is installed.  In that case  you  should
install a new GEM-font the proper way with  VST_LOAD_FONTS.  Such
GEM-fonts  have a header with all kinds of data about  the  font.
FONTKIT-fonts  and regular 4096-byte fonts don't have  a  header.
That's  why  we had to create a header for the new fonts  in  the
above  listing.  In this case we simply copied the header of  the
systemfont and made a few changes.

                     Procedures (CHAPTER.09)

Center                                                   CNTR_TXT
 Center a text on the screen:
     @center(5,40,text$)      ! start at line 5; 40 characters
                                   wide
 Line longer than 40 characters are printed on the next line(s).

Char_print_at                                          CHAR_PRINT
 Print any character (also with ASCII-code 1-31) on the screen:
    @char_print_at(1,10,16)        ! PRINT digital '0' at (1,10)

Fastprint_init and Fastprint                             FASTPRNT
 With an assembly-routine text is printed about four times faster
than with PRINT:
     @fastprint_init
     @fastprint(10,5,"Very fast")   ! same as PRINT AT(10,5);
                                                  "Very fast"
 This  Procedure  can  only be used on  the  TOS-screen  in  High
resolution.

Flash_text                                               FLASHTXT
 Flash a text a few times:
     @flash_text(TRUE,"attention",5)    ! flash 5 times with
                                                  bell-sound
 If the flag is FALSE the bell is not used.

Lin_max                                                   LIN_MAX
 Change number of PRINT-lines on TOS-screen:
     @lin_max(24)             ! line 1-24 available, line 25
                                              'protected'

Print_colors                                             PRNTCLRS
 Change background- and foreground(PRINT)-colours:
     @print_colors("777","000",ink$,paper$)   ! white letters on
                                                       black

Screen2_initScreen2_swap and Screen2_restore            SCREEN2
 Install  second screen as invisible logical screen  (mainly  for
animations):
     @screen2_init(FALSE,phys%,log%)    ! activate invisible
                                                  screen
     (...)                              ! draw on invisible
                                                  logical screen
     @screen2_swap(FALSE,phys%,log%)    ! swap physical and
                                                  logical screen
     (...)
     @screen2_restore                   ! restore original
                                                  screens
 If  the  flag  is TRUE,  the logical screen  is  copied  to  the
physical screen.

Scroll_print                                             SCRL_PRT
 Scroll text in box with (jerky) PRINT-command:
    @scroll_print("Scroll this text",5,10,8)
 The  text is scrolled at position (5,10) in a rectangle  with  a
width of 8 characters.

Scroll_text                                              SCRL_TXT
 Scroll text in box with (fluid) TEXT-command:
    @scroll_text("Scroll this text",50,100,80)
 The text is scrolled in a rectangle at coordinates (50,100) with
a width of 80 pixels.

Sound_print                                              SOUNDPRT
 A scale is played while a (short) text is PRINTed:
    @sound_print("Listen while this is PRINTed")

Systemfont_8x16 and Systemfont_8x8                       SYSTFONT
 Activate 8x16 or 8x8 systemfont for PRINT:
    @systemfont_8x16
    @systemfont_8x8

Systemfont_new                                           FONT_NEW
 Change  the  systemfont for PRINTing on the TOS-screen  in  High
resolution:
    ' Load font A1_DIGT.FON in INLINE-line:
    INLINE a1_digt%,4114
    @systemfont_new(TRUE)     ! install new systemfont
    (...)                     ! do some PRINTing
    @systemfont_new(FALSE)    ! restore original systemfont

Textfont_init                                            TEXTFONT
 Install one or more fonts for use with TEXT:
    ' Load font A1_DIGT.FON in INLINE-line:
    INLINE a1_digt%,4114
    @textfont_init
 You'll  have  to enter the correct number of new fonts  and  the
INLINE-addresses of the fonts in the Procedure yourself.

Vert_print                                               VERT_PRT
 PRINT a string vertically:
    @vert_print(10,1,"Vertical")   ! at position (10,1)

Wrap                                                         WRAP
 Switch 'Wrap' on or off:
    @wrap(TRUE)          ! Wrap on
 Not very useful,  except for PRINTing at position (80,25)  after
switching 'Wrap' off.

Wrap_word                                                WRAPWORD
 This Procedure wraps long text-lines, but is far superior to the
Procedure  Wrap as it wraps only whole words (after a space or  a
hyphen):
    @wrap_word(10,10,40,text$)     ! start at (10,10), 40
                                                  characters wide
 Of course you can also use the entire screen:
    @wrap_word(1,line,80,text$)    ! useful in text-editor

                     Functions (CHAPTER.09)
 All  Functions must be PRINTed.  Use a semicolon to  prevent  an
unwanted linefeed.

Center$ [Standard Function]                                CENTER
 Returns a text centered:
    PRINT @center$("This will be centered");      ! end with
                                                        semicolon
 This  is  a Standard Function (see paragraph 'The  Standard'  in
chapter 'INTRODUCTION').

Clr_line$ (VT52)                                   \VT52\CLR_LINE
 Clears a line completely:
    PRINT @clr_line$(10);          ! clear line 10
 This Function uses VT52-commands,  so it can only be used on the
TOS-screen.

Clr_lines_from$ (VT52)                             \VT52\CLR_LIFR
 Clears all lines to last line of screen:
    PRINT @clr_lines_from$(10);    ! clear line 10 - 25

Clr_lines_to$ (VT52)                               \VT52\CLR_LITO
 Clears all lines above (and inluding) the given one:
    PRINT @clr_lines_to$(10);      ! clear line 1 - 10

Clr_rest_line$ (VT52)                              \VT52\CL_RLINE
 Clear rest of current line from cursor-position:
    LOCATE 10,5
    PRINT @clr_rest_line$;         ! clear 10 - 80 on line 5

Clr_rest_screen$ (VT52)                            \VT52\CL_RSCRN
 Clear screen from current cursor-position:
    PRINT @clr_rest_screen$;

Flush_right$                                             FLUSH_RI
 Print text flushed right:
    PRINT @flush_right$("Flush me to the right");

Print_colors$ (VT52)                               \VT52\PRTCOLRS
 Use ink&- and paper&-colour for printing text:
    PRINT @print_colors$(" Red ink on green paper ",red,green);
 Of course the variables red& and green& must be defined.  In  my
programs they are Standard Globals anyway,  but that might not be
your  cup  of tea.  You can use VDI  colour-indices  because  the
Function converts these to SETCOLOR-indices through the Standard-
array setcolor&().

Print_ink$ (VT52) [Standard Function]              \VT52\PRINTINK
 Change the ink-colour for PRINTing:
    PRINT @print_ink$(red);
    PRINT "These letters are now red"

Print_paper$ (VT52) [Standard Function]            \VT52\PRINTPAP
 Change the paper-colour (background) for PRINTing:
    PRINT @print_paper$(green);
    PRINT " This background is now green "

Rev$ (VT52) [Standard Function]                         \VT52\REV
 Return  characters  reversed  for printing  on  High  resolution
screen:
    PRINT @rev$(" This is reverse "); 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.