Skip to main content
© Red Sector

Chapter Fifteen

   "The question is: Can modern, intrusive technology and liberal
     democracy co-exist?"
                              --Alvin Weinberg, Director, 1955-71
                                     Oakridge National Laboratory

 "Ow!"
 The  sharp exclamation of pain came from the middle-aged man  at
the head of the line.  He started to suck his thumb  rhythmically
as he moved out, MoneyCard in hand. It was Gerald's turn next.
 It was March of the year 2001.  Gerald,  Dot and the twins  were
standing  - with Mrs Wainthrop - in the line at the local  branch
of the Bank of England, which - according to the newspapers - had
now  been  renamed the Bank of Britain.  The sign  outside  still
showed a black horse - logo of the bank that actually owned  this
building, before Wye took over and stole all their money.
 They'd  come  today,  despite the  long  queues,  because  Wye's
broadcast  had  made it clear that old-fashioned  coin  and  note
money  would cease to be legal tender on the last day  of  March,
and  should be converted at the banks into a  MoneyCard  balance.
Dot  was  complaining again,  that she'd said  they  should  have
registered their bank accounts months ago, but would he listen...
 As  he  stepped  forward,   Gerald  could  see  two  hand-shaped
impressions  on the counter in front of him.  At just  below  eye
level  was what looked like a pair of binoculars on one of  those
odd multiple hinges used for angle-poise desk lamps,  and on  the
wall beside him was a printed list of instructions,  given in two
dozen different languages.
 Gerald quickly read the English version, which was at the top of
the list.  He adjusted the binoculars so that they fitted closely
over his eyes,  then placed his hands into the two impressions on
the counter, fingers spread apart.
 There  was a sharp stab of pain in the ball of his  left  thumb,
and  a quick - almost unseen - flash of bright light in his  eyes
before a mechanical voice said, "Next, please, Gerald."
 Gerald stepped aside, where he signed his name, then was quickly
photographed,  to  allow the rest of his party to go through  the
same procedure of identifying themselves with the bank computer.
 Once they had all passed through, even the twins, they each took
their  bank  books,  cheque books and cash money to  the  row  of
machines  along one wall of the bank.  Each machine - as well  as
the  by-now-familiar  MoneyCard  input port - had a  slot  for  a
cheque or the title page of a savings book to be inserted, one at
a time, and a number of slots for coins and notes.
 Gerald placed his Card over the raised area,  pressed his  thumb
to the plate,  then checked the screen.  He found that all of the
bank  accounts he owned had already been combined into  a  single
account.  Next,  he started feeding the coins and notes into  the
machine,  one  at a time,  watching the balance of his  MoneyCard
account increasing all the time until he ran out of cash.
 There  was a faint smell of burning paper inside the  bank  that
day,  as every note was cremated by the machine as soon as it had
been identified and credited to a Card account.
 And all the while,  bank staff stood by,  ready to identify  any
notes  or  bank  account  numbers  which  the  machine's  optical
character  recognition  devices had trouble with.  For  the  most
part, they had nothing to do.
 When  the entire family had converted their cash to a  MoneyCard
account - the twins emptying their piggy banks into the machines,
one tiny coin at a time - they left the bank and wandered to  the
local supermarket to do the weekly shopping.
 Along  the  way,  Gerald hurried past a pair of  street  beggars
sitting  in a doorway.  Normally,  he would have given them  some
change, but now...well, he'd have to stop and transfer some money
from  his MoneyCard account to theirs - if they had one.  And  if
they didn't, there was no way he could give them any money.
 The shopping took nearly an hour,  with Mrs Wainthrop  wandering
away  and  the  twins  running about  and  shouting  -  sometimes
stopping  to  suck on their still-sore thumbs - until Dot  put  a
stop to that.
 When they reached the checkout,  Dot was astonished to see  that
the  queues  were miniscule,  compared to the usual  queue  on  a
Saturday afternoon.
 The reason for the lack of any queues was soon obvious when they
saw  that the bulk of the shoppers were using MoneyCards to  pay,
as they themselves were going to.  Once the total was given,  the
customer placed her MoneyCard onto the familiar rectangle,  typed
the amount then pressed the thumbplate.
 A  special  queue,  far longer,  at the far end of the  line  of
checkouts was labelled 'Cash,  Cheques,  Direct Debit and  Credit
Cards.' That queue was moving fairly slowly,  letting out a faint
groan whenever somebody produced cash,  which had to be carefully
checked for forgeries.
 Every coin and every note was checked,  one by one, before being
accepted by the supermarket. This was necessary because, with the
advent  of the end of any possible market for forged  money,  all
the  most careful fakes had been showing up all over the  country
ever since Wye's announcement.

                              *****

 The  first casualty of the new MoneyCard system was the  banking
system.  This casualty was all-but-negligible, however, since the
major  banks  had  already  been  destroyed  in  favour  of   the
centralised Bank of Britain.
 However,  MoneyCards - and their associated bank accounts -  had
necessarily  been  granted to those who had not  previously  been
allowed to have bank accounts - such as the homeless and those on
low wages.
 All notes and coins had been converted into electronic  balances
in the central banking computer - with backups scattered over the
country, and double-checks in the form of an internal record kept
by the MoneyCard itself.
 Soon,  people had no need to visit their banks at all - and  the
branches were sold off or re-modelled as temporary homes for  the
homeless while more permanent homes were being constructed.
 Problems were caused for street beggars - even those people  who
might have tossed a couple of coins in their direction now  found
themselves  hurrying  past,  unwilling  to take  enough  time  to
perform a full MoneyCard transaction.
 Since the government,  under Wye,  wouldn't intervene  directly,
pressure  grew  for charities to step in - with Wye  pledging  to
match, penny for penny, every donation. So long as his conditions
were met.
 Combined  with the house-building programme,  this  helped  many
people to leave the streets and to be re-trained - or,  as it was
in many cases,  trained - the latter being one of the  conditions
imposed by the Dictator.  This course was taken in parallel  with
another  of Wye's programmes - the universal provision  of  high-
quality childcare services.
 Those  services,  for children under the schooling age of  three
years,  were  provided  on  the same basis as  the  rest  of  the
educational  system  - even to the extent  that  expenditure  per
child  was  all-but-identical.  Funding for  such  childcare  was
provided via a deferred-loan system - to be repaid when MoneyCard
accounts  were  in healthier state,  regardless of  whether  that
state might be reached within a month, a year or several decades.
 The most usual course of re-training - for the impoverished, the
homeless and those parents now freed to (re)enter the workplace -
was  as  a teacher,  since that was now  the  third-highest  paid
occupation  in  the  country,   the  first  two  being   research
scientists and development technicians.
 When Wye took over,  one of his early actions was to treble  the
salary of teachers of some specific subjects - the sciences;  all
languages,  ancient  and  modern;  and the five  subjects  newly-
introduced  at  primary  school  level:   marketing,  philosophy,
comparative religion, sex education and media studies. The latter
four  were now compulsory subjects at all ages and all levels  of
education.
 The second casualty of the MoneyCard was tax-dodging,  since all
transactions  by  MoneyCard  -  and  all  transactions  were   by
MoneyCard  -  automatically  had  fifteen  percent  deducted  and
diverted into the government account.  There were no  exemptions,
and  no  higher  or  lower rates of taxation  for  any  goods  or
payments,  and thus no loopholes to be exploited by  unscrupulous
accountants.
 The Inland Revenue was informed,  by the 59th Flapper,  that its
services were no longer required, and the Treasury dissolved into
its new role as a collector of statistics. Later on, as computers
increasingly took over this task also, the Treasury - as a branch
of the government - disappeared altogether.
 Perhaps even more startling,  however,  was the third  casualty:
the crime of mugging.  After a few weeks,  potential muggers soon
caught on to the idea that the only way to steal money was via  a
MoneyCard.  And that left a record in the central computer that a
blind policeman could follow.
 Literally  - since special MoneyCards had been circulated  which
used braille to label their keys and had a second display,  below
the  LCD,  which read in braille as a line of  raised-and-lowered
pins.
 With every new technology, however, new crimes are born.

                              *****

 "We've got one," Harold said,  not without some satisfaction. He
had  been  called  to the central computer room  at  the  Network
control centre in Birmingham because one of the SNAFU alarms  had
been activated.
 The SNAFU alarms had been designed to trigger when the  computer
observed  something suspicious in the incoming signals - in  this
case, an unusual pattern of signals had been detected.
 More specifically, the same signal - with minor variations - was
being  transmitted many times in rapid succession from  different
sources around the Network.
 The  Network  was  set  up to handle this  kind  of  attempt  to
overload  it,  and had automatically sent requests to all of  the
surrounding  booster  links to ask them where  the  signals  were
coming from,  not trusting the location identifier in the  signal
itself to tell it where they were coming from.
 Harold was unsurprised to find that all of the signals - despite
having  codes which identified their points of origin  as  widely
diverse  -  were  actually arriving along a single  path  of  the
Network.
 The  central  computer  kept up a facade  of  sending  "waiting"
signals to the apparent origins of each signal,  while it  busily
tracked it, booster link by booster link, through the Network.
 Within five seconds - quick in human terms,  but an eternity  in
computer  terms,  particularly  in this computer's  terms  -  the
signals  were  traced to a single origin point,  and a  name  and
address automatically sent to the police nearest that point.
 Harold hurriedly put on his jacket and commandeered a helicopter
to  take  him  to the point of origin.  He wanted  to  meet  this
bastard, and radioed ahead to the police station to tell them not
to  use  sirens,  and to merely hold everybody at  that  location
until he got there.
 When he arrived,  two hours later, he found a seventeen year-old
girl sitting, sulkily, in the back seat of a police car.
 Harold  ignored  her for the moment,  walking instead  into  the
house.  Inside,  he found a strange-looking box connected to  the
Network  terminal  where  a MoneyCard would be  expected  to  be.
Careful  not to touch the box,  he examined the terminal  itself.
Satisfied  that  this was the origin of  the  rogue  signals,  he
disconnected  the terminal from the Network by the  simple,  low-
tech expedient of ripping its cable from the wall.
 "Arrest her," he addressed the police officers in the car, "On a
charge of attempted murder (Network)."
 The  police  stared at him in disbelief.  After  a  moment,  one
asked, "What charge?"
 "You heard me," Harold repeated,  "Attempted murder  (Network)."
This time, you could hear him pronounce the brackets. Harold went
on,  "It's a new crime, only on the statute books for a couple of
months, and it carries the same penalties as attempted homicide."
 "For hacking?" the girl said,  in disbelief. She started to cry,
noisily,  and  one of the officers absent-mindedly passed  her  a
handkerchief.  "I didn't mean any harm," she said, once her tears
dried a little, "It was only hacking."
 Harold looked stern for a moment, "Only hacking. Do you have any
idea  what  could have happened if that little box of  tricks  of
yours had worked? If the Network had been overloaded with useless
signals?"
 She  shook  her head,  saying,  "No - but...well,  it  was  only
hacking."
 "Think  about  this  while you're in prison,"  Harold  went  on,
"Every hospital,  every police station,  every fire station - all
of the emergency services in the country rely in some way on  the
Network. If it goes down...Well, I'd rather not think about it."
 "But...that's  crazy!" cried one of the  police  officers,  "You
mean that all of the country's eggs are in one basket?"
 "Yes,  sort  of,"  Harold added,  "In fact,  there are  so  many
failsafes and backup computers in the system  that...well,  let's
just  say  that a million-to-one shot would be a  sure  thing  in
comparison to the chances of the Network going down."
 "But it could happen?"
 "Well,  yes - but the entire country could slip into the sea  in
the  next  minute.  That would be more likely,  by the  way,"  he
added.
 "So  why  the all the fuss if I couldn't have  done  any  harm?"
asked the hacker.
 "Because,"  Harold  said,  "You didn't know  that  you  couldn't
succeed. All you thought about was having a bit of fun and trying
to crash the Network - no thought for the consequences.
 "I don't know about you," he asked the policemen,  "But I  think
an attempted murder charge is letting her off easy. Just consider
what  would  happen  in every hospital and fire  station  in  the
country  if all the 'phone lines went down at the same  time.  To
say  nothing  of  the  power  and  water  lines,  if  the  cables
overloaded and burned through."
 With a grim look, thinking of the scenario Harold had described,
the  police officers booked the hacker on a charge of  'Attempted
Murder (Network).' Two months later,  when she stood  trial,  she
pleaded not guilty, but was found guilty - mainly on the evidence
of Harold Baines, who had dissected the box he had taken from her
Network terminal.
 Bearing  in mind her age,  and the fact that this was the  first
case tried under a new law,  the judged passed-down a sentence in
the middle of the range allowed to him: six years.
 The arresting officer, thinking of Baines's words, still thought
the sentence was too lenient.  The public,  once the implications
of what she had tried to do had been explained,  and had sunk in,
agreed with him.

Chapter Sixteen

                    "Ethics change with technology."
                                       --Larry Niven


 One  major result of the universal use of both the  Network  and
MoneyCards was the eventual removal of the 'work ethic.'
 A  great many people now worked from home,  'telecommuting'  via
their  home  terminals.  This practice spread as  more  and  more
business  was  conducted  via  the  Network,  and  manual  labour
increasingly came to be performed by remote-controlled  machines.
And the Network terminals at workplaces were usually identical to
those in people's homes.
 In fact,  it was fairly common for the home Network terminal  to
be far superior to those at work - particularly in the first  two
years, when Wye's 'bonus' was in operation.
 Now that more people were working from home,  and everybody  was
paid  via their home terminal - rather than by  cheque,  cash  or
giro  -  it was difficult,  if not impossible,  to tell  who  was
employed and who was unemployed.
 As  Wye's programme of scientific research bore fruit,  and  the
wealth  of the country as a whole increased,  even  the  economic
differences  became  smaller - and gradually the  divide  between
'bread  winner' and 'state scrounger' vanished,  as there was  no
way  to tell the two apart without checking the central  computer
records - which virtually nobody was permitted to do without  the
explicit permission - given by thumbprint and, later, by a retina
scan - of that individual.
 That lay two decades ahead,  however. More immediately, a second
new  crime  'created'  by  the MoneyCards did  not  have  such  a
straightforward technological solution as the first.
 This crime was named 'ThumbTheft.'

                                 *****

 "Okay,  hand it over, grandma!" the speaker was one of a gang of
acne-cratered  teenagers,  and  he  was holding a  knife  to  the
elderly woman's throat.  She passed him her MoneyCard quickly, as
people had been advised to do.
 The punks ran off quickly,  down to the local off-licence, where
they  hoped  to  spend some money before the  Card  was  reported
stolen.  Before going in,  they checked the balance of the Card -
pushed  the  "Balance" button then sweated a  thumb  against  its
thumb-plate.  A  message scrolled past on the LCD,  "This is  not
your MoneyCard.  There will be a short delay while I obtain  your
Card's balance from the central computer."
 "Shit!" the leader of the gang threw down the Card and they  all
ran for it.
 Two hours later,  the Card was reported stolen.  A check of  the
central  computer  records immediately showed a  balance  request
from somebody using that Card,  and obligingly provided the  name
and address of the thief.

                                 *****

 "Okay,  hand it over, grandma!" the speaker was one of a gang of
acne-cratered  teenagers,  and  he  was holding a  knife  to  the
elderly woman's throat.  She passed him her MoneyCard quickly, as
people had been advised to do.
 Then  the  head  punk added,  "Now hold  out  your  right  hand,
grandma.  This will only hurt for a moment." He grasped her wrist
with  one hand,  and quickly sliced off her right thumb.  A  hand
over her mouth choked off her scream of pain before she fainted.
 The stolen thumb was rapidly flayed to provide a rough  covering
for  his  own  thumb,  allowing the punk  access  to  the  stolen
MoneyCard.
 The punks ran off quickly,  down to the local off-licence, where
they  hoped  to  spend some money before the  Card  was  reported
stolen.  Before  going in,  he checked the balance of the Card  -
pushed  the "Balance" key and then pressed the  thumb-plate  with
his  disguised  thumb.  He  laughed in delight when  he  saw  the
balance.

                                 *****

 Thumbtheft  was  committed by accosting  somebody  and  stealing
their MoneyCard. In addition, that person's thumb was cut off and
flayed  to  form  a close-fitting sheath which  fitted  over  the
criminal's own thumb.
 When  pressed  to the thumbplate of the  stolen  MoneyCard,  the
thumb-condom - or thumbdom,  as it came to be known - allowed the
criminal to buy items using the stolen Card,  at least until  the
Card was reported as stolen.
 Many thumbthieves were arrested,  simply by their continuing  to
use the Card for too long,  and more were arrested simply because
they had used the thumbdom to transfer the balance of the  stolen
Card  to their own MoneyCard.  As soon as the Card  was  reported
stolen,  a  check of the banking records showed the transfer  and
they could be immediately identified and arrested.
 Once  the problem of thumbtheft became apparent,  Wye  announced
that every transaction made using a thumbdom was void,  and money
illegally  transferred  would be automatically  returned  to  the
victim or - more usually - to the victim's next of kin.
 Despite  this  powerful incentive,  thumbthievery was  rife  for
almost  two  years  - long enough  for  the  words  'thumbthief,'
'thumbthieve,'  'thumbtheft' and 'thumbdom' to make it  into  the
OED.
 It did not vanish until it became common practice for people  to
check  for  a thumbdom by rubbing their customers's  thumbs  with
their  own  before  accepting payment,  giving  the  alert  if  a
thumbdom was being used.
 By  the time retina-scanners were introduced  as  further,  then
replacement,  identity  checks,  the custom of  thumbrubbing  had
become so firmly entrenched that it survived as a way of  sealing
a  sale,  even  after a simple thumbprint was no longer  used  to
prove a person's identity.

Chapter Seventeen

      "The belief in coincidence is the prevalent superstition of
     the Age of Science."
                --Robert Shea & Robert Anton Wilson,
 Illuminatus!

 It  was  the fortieth anniversary of Yuri  Gagarin's  flight  in
Vostok - the anniversary of the first ever space flight, short as
it  had  been - and the Great Dictator had  declared  a  national
holiday,  Gagarin  Day,  to be held every April the  twelfth,  in
honour of the first human space traveller.
 Wye was relaxing,  playing chess with Deborah.  The game  wasn't
going too well for the General, so he was actually quite relieved
at  the  interruption  when her husband burst  into  the  room  -
looking  more  excited  than either of them  had  ever  seen  him
before.
 "They've done it!" he shouted, "They've done it!"
 The  General  leapt to his feet -  'accidentally'  knocking  the
chess board over,  and receiving an amused glare from Deborah for
his pains - to ask, "Who're 'They' and what have they done?"
 "They - They've done it!" Graham repeated, more excited now, and
babbling  in  his joy,  "It's been done - they've  done  it!"  he
explained further.
 "Now,  now. Calm down, Graham," Wye took his arm, and led him to
a chair.  He managed to get him sat down,  while Deborah  brought
over a cup of tea for her husband.
 Once they'd managed to calm Graham down a small amount, he said,
"It's  been  done,"  he tried to  ignore  their  further  calming
noises,  going  on,  "Space flight!  We've got a  ground-to-orbit
ship!"
 "Huh?"  Wye  and  Deborah said,  stunned into  stupidity  for  a
moment.
 When  the  fifty-ninth flapper came into the cabinet  room  five
minutes  later,  to check out the strange noises,  he  found  the
three  of them leaping and dancing and shouting for joy -  large,
stupid-looking  grins  of ecstasy plastered over  each  of  their
faces.
 "Flapper!"  called the Dictator,  "Can you ask Estelle Demot  to
get here as fast as possible,  please. No - scratch that, it's no
emergency. Just ask her to come over, will you?"
 The  flapper  nodded acquiescence,  and - feeling  more  than  a
little  relieved to be leaving the madness behind him  -  hurried
out of the cabinet room to make the 'phone call.
 Estelle arrived shortly.  "I think we all deserve a  first-class
meal,  all four of us.  How say you?" shouted Absolaam  Wye,  the
same stupid grin still plastered on his face.
 Everybody called "Aye!" then Estelle asked,  puzzled,  "What are
we celebrating?"
 The meal was a success - delicious consomme, rich venison, well-
hung grouse,  smoothly beautiful chocolate mousse and wine beyond
belief, all washed down with liberal helpings of champagne.
 Afterwards,  Deborah  and Graham wandered up to their  bed,  and
Estelle and Absolaam hurried towards theirs.
 Closing - but not locking,  he knew they wouldn't be disturbed -
the door behind him,  Absolaam led Estelle quickly to their  bed:
'theirs'  by  mutual  agreement,  made months  before  but  never
vocalised.
 They exchanged kisses, scarcely breaking to draw breath, as they
each  undressed the other - not taking their time,  but  speedily
discarding clothes to left and right.
 Once bare, and still kissing, they reclined together on the bed.
Absolaam  ducked  his  head to  Estelle's  breasts,  moving  down
between  them  and  pausing only to suck slightly  at  her  downy
stomach,  blowing gently and causing goose-bumps to appear on her
dampened flesh.
 His head,  his mouth,  descended further to her thighs,  drawing
between them to probe, delicately at first, then with more force,
his  tongue entering her as it had so often before,  nudging  her
clitoris gently as his tongue worked its wonders.
 Estelle let out a soft moan,  then clasped Absolaam's hair  with
her  right hand,  drawing him deeper and deeper until he  had  to
tilt his head at a sharp angle to be able to breath at all.
 As he felt her stomach muscles contract slightly,  he  redoubled
his efforts,  holding and raising the twin globes of her buttocks
to keep a firm grip on her anxiously gyrating hips.
 When  Estelle came,  Absolaam lapped - cat-like - at  her  lips,
drinking  the warm fluid as though it were the finest  nectar  of
the gods of Olympus. He raised his head to hers, his mouth to her
mouth,  and  they exchanged a kiss,  she tasting herself  on  his
tongue, and revelling in it.
 His penis,  hard - the veins along its length throbbing and  the
foreskin stretched back so far that will-power alone kept it from
tearing.
 Estelle  reached down and  carefully,  deliciously,  unrolled  a
condom  along his length before he tried to slowly move  it  into
position. At first, Wye moved his hips too quickly and his organ,
swaying  from  side to side,  banged back and forth  between  his
lover's thighs.
 Then, Estelle reached down to grasp him and guide him into her -
his sudden urge to thrust forward and deeply held in  check,  for
the moment, by her hand alone.
 Then,  her hand returned to his buttocks, pulling him forward as
quickly as he had wanted to move.  His balls banged against her -
causing  him  to gasp in mild pain - as Absolaam  thrust  forward
then  backward,  forward then backward,  in and in and in and  in
and...
 Absolaam heard rather than felt himself coming - heard it in the
quick  gasps  of  his lover as she  responded  to  his  straining
muscles faster than he could ever do - heard it in his own ragged
breath  -  heard it in the rustle of silk sheets as  he  expended
himself  within Estelle,  and fell back - they both fell  back  -
exhausted.
 Within a very few minutes, the General was asleep.

                              *****

 "You're sure that this will work?" the General asked.
 He,  Graham and Deborah were in Ecuador, where they had bought a
large  tract  of land to which they had  conveyed  the  prototype
ground-to-orbit ship, Phaelon, ready for its test launch.
 The reason they'd built in Ecuador was because of its  location.
Being,  as  its name suggests,  on the equator,  it was an  ideal
launch  site  -  the Phaelon could get an extra  boost  from  the
rotation of the Earth,  which they couldn't get off the  equator,
and so could use less fuel when launching.
 The date was July the twenty-first,  2001 - planned to  coincide
with  the thirty-second anniversary of the first moon-landing  in
1969.
 "We're pretty sure it'll work, Dictator...sorry, 'Absolaam'...We
just want this test to make certain," Daniel Petri, the Phaelon's
designer,  replied,  "After  all,  this  ship's engine  in  quite
revolutionary."
 "It's just..." Wye stumbled to a halt,  then began again, "Well,
it looks so odd, you know?"
 "I know," Daniel said,  "Space craft designs are usually  fairly
uniform.  With Phaelon,  though, I redesigned the exterior myself
to reduce wind resistance on lift-off as much as possible.  She's
not too pretty, but..."
 Deborah interrupted,  "I can't agree,  Daniel - she's beautiful!
Much more attractive than the phallic rockets used previously."
 "Why,  thank you,  Deborah," Daniel took a bow, "The design, far
from being phallic, is more like a pyramid, as you can see."
 As  Daniel went over the changes to the Phaelon's  design,  both
exterior and in her engines, Graham, Deborah and Wye simply gaped
at  the ship as though it was the most beautiful sight  they  had
ever seen.
 Of course, she was.
 At least,  she was until ten hours later when, pre-launch checks
out  of  the way,  the Phaelon lifted from its  launch  pad.  The
movement was graceful,  despite the ship's bulk,  and the engines
burned smoothly.
 Two loud booms were heard,  in quick succession, from where they
stood, half a mile away, but that was the only sound - nobody was
speaking,  and nobody was looking anywhere but at the Phaelon  as
she  rose higher and higher,  piercing the sky,  a  vapour  trail
outlined starkly against the blue until it merged with the clouds
far above, roiling and tossing them, mixing and churning, until -
through the cloud layer - Phaelon was invisible to the naked eye.
 The four - Daniel, Wye and the Greenes - hurried quickly inside,
into  the  control  room where they  could  monitor  the  craft's
progress.  The first words they heard inside that room, the first
words  they'd  heard uttered since the lift-off,  came  from  the
speakers  in the corner,  "Phaelon to Ecuador  Control,  we  have
attained orbit.  Say again, we have reached orbit and are in free
fall."
 The cheers in the room were deafening after the earlier silence.

                              *****

 "The  main  item tonight," the news anchor said,  "Is  that  the
first  British space craft,  Phaelon,  launched from Ecuador  and
reached  orbit one hour ago,  at seventeen sixteen local  time  -
that's twenty-two sixteen,  GMT. Both the Phaelon's pilot, Eunice
Johnson,  and her Co-pilot,  David Bowman, are said to be fit and
well.
 "Captain  Johnson  sent a short message back to  Ecuador  ground
control from orbit..."
 The  image  changed  to a photograph of a  thirty-one  year  old
brunette,  captioned with her name,  Eunice Johnson. Her face was
handsome, but the most captivating aspect were her piercing hazel
eyes.
 Her  voice  was  heard clearly,  though there  was  some  static
interference,  as she said,  "Forty years ago,  Yuri Gagarin made
the first space flight.  Thirty-two years ago today,  in the year
that I was born, Neil Armstrong made the first moon-landing.
 "Who would have dreamed then that mankind would go to the  moon,
come back and then - after a very few years - just stop."
 Eunice  Johnson's  voice grew even stronger as  she  said,  with
determination,  "This  time  we go on - out to the rest  of  this
solar system, then onwards and outwards. To the stars!"
 Dot and Gerald sat for a moment,  before Dot said, "I think it's
a crime."
 Gerald,  surprised,  turned  to his wife and  asked,  "What  is,
dear?"
 "Spending  all that money in space when there's so much good  it
could do right here on the Earth."
 "Like what, dear?"
 "Well,  like  medical  research,  famine relief - that  kind  of
thing."
 "But, love, the space program in the old days had spin-offs that
have helped in those things."
 "Like what?" she asked, interested despite herself.
 "Let me think," he said,  "I was reading about this recently. Ah
yes," he stood up and wandered over to the terminal,  "If I  look
up the Apollo program then I'm pretty sure..."
 "No - just tell me.  If these things are so important,  then I'm
sure you'll be able to remember them," Dot snapped.
 Gerald sat down again,  "Okay,  love. Well, lightweight crutches
and  surgical appliances were made possible because of  materials
developed  for the space program.  The microchip came out of  the
space program - it was needed to reduce the weight,  and increase
the speed and efficiency, of the ships's control systems.
 "Hmmm.  Those are both debatable,  but...Of course - satellites!
Weather  satellites  to  identify areas at  risk  from  droughts,
hurricanes,  monsoons,  and  what have you,  and to help  protect
crops  and  - if they have to -  evacuate  people.  Communication
satellites to keep isolated doctors in the third-world up-to-date
with the latest techniques to help them to save lives.
 "And what about metals?  They're getting more and more expensive
all the time,  because they're getting harder and harder to  find
and mine. Satellites help locate them, of course, but send a ship
to  the asteroid belt and we could bring back a chunk of  nickel-
iron a couple of miles across.  Then there're drugs that can only
be manufactured in a vacuum or in free fall.
 "There's  lots of things,  love - so many that I can't tell  you
about."
 "What do you mean, you can't tell me - you're my husband!"
 "Yes,  love,  but I mean things that haven't been invented  yet.
Things that we can't do on Earth,  but might be able to make  and
use out in space."
 "Now that's fairy tales," Deborah said, dismissively.
 "Maybe   -  but  how  would  you  describe  a  computer   before
electricity was harnessed? There were no words, but never mind...
 "What  about lebensraum - colonies off-Earth for the human  race
to expand into. This planet is getting crowded, love. And even if
it weren't,  I think it was Heinlein who once said, 'The Earth is
too small and fragile a basket for the human race to keep all its
eggs in.' There are so many things we can use space for, love.
 "And  one  of the most important things might be  for  space  to
live."
 "And what sort of life would it be,  I wonder,  all cramped  and
things floating around - I wouldn't like it I'm sure," Dot added.
 "About every fifty million years or so,  love..." Gerald trailed
off, unwilling to go any further.
 "No - go on, what were you going to say?" his wife demanded.
 "Oh,  nothing," he said,  and settled back to watch the rest  of
the news.

                              *****

 "Every so often," the General said,  "There is a mass extinction
of life forms on the Earth. The trilobites, ammonites, dinosaurs.
What causes these things?"
 "I don't know," Daniel Petri said, "But I know what the theories
are."
 Wye nodded, "So do I - and the most disturbing theory involves a
close approach - very close - by a comet.
 "That's not the main reason - but it's one of the biggies -  why
I want self-sufficient off-Earth colonies established as soon  as
possible.
 "Heinlein," said Daniel, absently.
 "Hmmm?"
 "Robert A.  Heinlein once said something like, 'The Earth is too
small  and  fragile a basket for the human race to keep  all  its
eggs in.' That sounds like what you're saying."
 "It is - now get on it," the General replied,  adding, "I'd like
to get some kind of colony established within the next decade, if
that's possible, even if it's only a luna base."
 "In the meantime, we carry on with the space station?"
 "Yes  - the space hotel goes on as planned," Wye thought  for  a
moment, "Oh, and you can probably count on a little extra revenue
coming  your way from the sale of unused cargo bay space  in  the
Phaelon's future flights."

Chapter Eighteen

        "Against Stupidity, the Gods themselves contend in vain."
                    --Friedrich Von Schiller,
 The Maid of Orleans

 1800 hours,  GMT,  July the twenty-second, AD 2001, was the time
scheduled for the final broadcast from Phaelon before it made its
return to the Earth's surface.
 Television cameras in Ecuador ground control were beaming  their
pictures live to every television set in the British  Isles,  and
beyond, as General Wye talked with Captain Johnson.
 "Wye to Phaelon, are you receiving me?"
 "You should say 'over,' Dictator," a young technician whispered.
 "Ah, yes. Sorry - I forgot. 'Over.'" Wye added.
 After  a split-second delay,  Eunice Johnson's voice was  heard,
"Phaelon to Wye.  Receiving you.  Looking forward to going  home.
Over."
 Wye grinned.  His face was not turned towards the camera,  since
he  was more interested in the Phaelon than in  publicity  shots,
but  the overjoyed twinkle in his eyes was still visible  to  the
television viewers.
 "Wye  to Phaelon.  And we're looking forward to seeing you  back
soon, Eunice," he paused before remembering to add, "Over."
 A strange voice cut into the transmission - one less obscured by
static  than  Eunice's,  yet not originating inside  the  control
room,  "This  is the leader of the British Liberation Army,"  the
voice proclaimed,  "In protest at the dictatorship being enforced
on the British people by so-called-General Wye, we have planted a
bomb aboard the Phaelon, timed to explode one minute from now.
 "So perish all who aid this self-proclaimed dictator." The voice
cut off.
 The  shocked expressions of everybody in the control  room  were
plain  to see - none more shocked and appalled than Wye  himself,
as  he  shouted to ask if anybody had traced the  source  of  the
transmission  and called to the Phaelon,  "Search  everywhere  on
board  -  tear  the ship apart if you have  to.  Just  Find  that
Fucking Bomb!
"
 The explosion, when it came, could not be heard. The blip on the
telemetry  display  which showed the  Phaelon's  position  simply
vanished and Captain Johnson's voice transmission cut off in mid-
sentence.  There was a bright light in the sky,  but only for  an
instant  and only as bright as a star - it was barely visible  to
the naked eye.
 All in the control room, and all across the British Isles, there
was a dead silence.

                              *****

 "This  is  my  fault,"  the  Dictator  said  in  his  television
broadcast immediately following the explosion,  "The explosion of
Phaelon, and the murder of her crew, is my fault.
 "I did not set the bomb,  but I know who did.  You know who did.
They call themselves the BLA - the British Liberation Army.
 "I have tolerated them up until now,  because I thought that  we
knew what their activities were.  I thought that we would be able
to stop them from doing anything dangerous ever again.  But I was
wrong."
 Tears  formed in Wye's eyes,  coursing down his cheeks in  anger
and sorrow,  as he repeated,  "I was wrong - and the crew of  the
Phaelon  died  because  of  my  over-confidence.  Captain  Eunice
Johnson  and  Commander  David Bowman have  died,  thanks  to  my
overconfidence.
 "Murdered by the BLA."
 Wye slammed his clenched fist on the control board,  punctuating
every word with a crash as he vowed, "They will pay for this."
 Wye turned to face the camera full-on, and said, "I had intended
to tell you this later on,  when those of you who are  Christians
were  beginning  to have doubts about what your  religion  stands
for.
 "I see now that I should have told you straight away.
 "If  you  check  the published accounts of  the  Roman  Catholic
church in Britain and the Church of England, you will notice that
those  so-called  religions diverted a total  of  thirty  million
pounds into two companies - Anglo-Egyptian Holdings and Low  Tech
Furnishings
.
 "If  you then use your terminal to check the accounts  of  those
two companies,  you will see what I knew several months ago. But,
dammit, I did nothing about it," Wye hit the control panel again.
 "You will see," he went on,  "That those two companies have only
one purpose - to funnel money through to another concern,  wholly
owned by five people.
 "The five leaders of the BLA.
 "I  urge  you to check these facts for yourself -  the  accounts
have all been published previously. Satisfy yourself that nothing
has been doctored.
 "Then think what you want to do about those two religions.
 "As for myself: There are just under three hundred known members
of the BLA.  They are all being rounded up as I speak,  and  they
will  be tried on charges of treason,  murder and  conspiracy  to
murder.
 "I  repeat," Wye was crying again,  and pounding the desk as  he
went  on,  "the  fault here is mine - I undoubtedly  should  have
taken  action as soon as I learned who was funding the BLA -  the
Roman Catholic church and the Church of England.
 "I took no actions then,  and now those murdering bastards  have
killed two of the finest people," Wye choked back a sob.
 "The space program will go on," he said,  with determination  in
his voice, "It will go on, despite this callous murder."
 He nodded his head,  and the transmission ended.  Wye,  however,
continued sobbing for a very long time.
 When  he returned to Britain,  Wye's first action was to  remove
his lingering doubts as to whether Estelle had known of the  bomb
on  board Phaelon.  All checking by MI8 showed that she  had  not
known,  and  nor  had the rest of MI7,  while  Graham's  personal
checks made sure that MI8 had neither known of nor engineered the
murder.
 Nonetheless,  Estelle  was  dismissed from her position  on  the
grounds of incompetence.  Wye liked her very much, but two people
-  two  astronauts  -  had  died  because  of  her   department's
incompetence.  Her incompetence.  He could not - and would not  -
permit her to carry on after that.
 His second action was a little more dramatic.  To the Dictator's
amazement,  he received a formal,  extremely public,  and -  most
surprisingly - unprompted request from King William.  The  king's
request was simple:  having learned of the links between the  BLA
and  the  Church  of England,  he asked  permission  to  formally
renounce his position as head of that church.
 William's  motivations  were  very  different  from  the  public
perception  of them.  Whereas the public thought that his  action
was  motivated  by a desire to show solidarity with  the  British
people in their grief,  he was - in reality - more concerned with
distancing himself as far as possible from the terrorists who had
murdered his father.  After all,  the IRA hard-core were now  the
cornerstone of the BLA.
 When Wye gave his permission to the young king, his decision was
applauded  -  except in the Anglican  church  itself,  which  was
damaged  more  by  this  breaking  of  its  last  ties  to   "The
Establishment" than by its connections to terrorists.
 Later,  Wye attended the trials of the members of the BLA -  the
greatest  mass trial seen since Nuremberg.  When the verdicts  of
"guilty"  on  the charges of treason,  murder and  conspiracy  to
murder were returned by the various juries,  Wye breathed a  sigh
of relief.
 He had few qualms when he saw the judge pass sentence - Wye  had
insisted,  and  made clear before the trial,  that  every  guilty
verdict would receive a sentence of execution.

                              *****

 "You can't do this,  Absolaam," Deborah said,  sentiments echoed
by her husband.
 "Why the Hell not?" Wye replied,  angrily,  "You saw what  those
bastards did.  They murdered this country's first two astronauts.
I  can't let them get away with that!" he slammed the  desk  with
his fist, spraying dust into the air.
 "We  said," Deborah said,  quietly,  "That this would be a  non-
violent government.  Violence only when absolutely unavoidable  -
that's what we said."
 "Goddammit,  woman!  How  the  fuck can we continue to  be  non-
violent when bastards like them are killing our friends?"
 "Do you insist on carrying out those death sentences?"
 "I do."
 "Then you can have my resignation now," she went on, calmly.
 Deborah  rose  to her feet and started  towards  the  door.  Her
husband was torn briefly, but then he, too, rose to follow her.
 "Deborah!" Wye cried, in anguish, "Graham!"
 Deborah  stopped a moment.  Without turning around,  she  asked,
"What is it, Dictator?"
 "Damn  you - alright!" Wye said,  through clenched  teeth,  "You
win."
 "No executions?"
 "No   executions   -  I'll  commute  the   sentences   to   life
imprisonment," the Dictator replied, through clenched teeth, "Are
you satisfied now?" he added, bitterly.
 "Yes, thank you, Absolaam. You won't regret this decision."
 As she and her husband returned to their seats,  they heard  the
sound of Absolaam Wye's sobbing.

                              *****

 In  September  of  the year 2001,  a team  of  geneticists  were
working on the recently-revived human genome project - attempting
to  understand the genetic basis of the mechanisms by which  some
cancers  are  initiated - when the project leader began  to  show
symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.
 A  check showed a microscopic tear in his  protective  clothing,
and  rapid  work  on  the substances he  had  been  working  with
demonstrated a close link between diseases of the human mind  and
that particular family of chemicals.
 Work  on  blocking the action of those organics proceeded  at  a
breathtaking   pace   -  the  project  leader,   fearful   of   a
disintegrating  mind,  deciding to act as a human guinea  pig  to
test suspected antidotes.  By the end of October, his Alzheimer's
went into remission as a result of the ingestion of an artificial
protein - one which does not occur naturally.
 The  chemical discovered was,  after further testing  for  side-
effects, released for general human use six months later.
 When  Mrs Wainthrop started her course of stonalin -  the  drug,
because of its effects on the memory, had been named in honour of
Albert   Einstein  -  her  short-term  memory   failures   almost
immediately ceased to take place.
 And she gratefully began her training in biochemistry.

Chapter Nineteen

             "I am fearful of an overly organised church."
                                               --Charles M. Shulz


 During  the  trials of the BLA membership - which  included  two
dozen  clergymen  -  the most frequently accessed  files  in  the
British  Library  were  the company  records  and  the  published
accounts of religious bodies. Those records were also the subject
of  an  in-depth piece and - later - a bestselling  book  by  the
Guardian's Carolyn Mayes, and were covered by too many television
documentaries and Sunday supplement articles to mention.
 Almost immediately,  attendance at the Roman Catholic church and
the  Church of England fell - to less than one thousand and  five
thousand, respectively - all across the country.
 Wye  made  a decision to provide funding only to  religions  who
could  demonstrate - using the "ID" button on their MoneyCards  -
at least ten thousand worshippers. That decision, combined with a
natural  reluctance  to  take up  a  collection  via  MoneyCards,
reduced the congregations of those churches still further.
 By the end of the year, the BLA - with both its funding and what
support  it had gained from the public cut off - had  effectively
ceased to exist.
 The Roman Catholic and Anglican churches lay in virtual ruins  -
their   worshippers  having  converted  en  masse  to   different
Christian  denominations.  Those that had bothered to convert  at
all.
 And, by the end of the year 2001, the building of Phaelon II had
been completed. 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.