Skip to main content
© Bitman

Chapter Six

             "What I tell you three times is true."
                        --Lewis Carroll, The Hunting of The Snark

 The  third  day  of power came,  and it was  time  for  the  new
governors to fully take on the mantle which they had assumed. Wye
was going to have to take to the world stage.
 "I  don't  like this - it smacks too much of  showmanship,"  Wye
said to Deborah,  "And that's exactly the kind of thing I'd hoped
to avoid here."
 "I  know,  I  know," she replied,  "But we're going to  have  to
clarify our relationship to the rest of the world sometime, which
means  that  you  are  going  to  have  to  meet  all  of   those
ambassadors. We should have done it on the first day, really."
 "Does it have to be one at a time, though? It'll take hours," he
whined, "Weeks, maybe!"
 Graham  got  a mischievous glint in his eye as he  said  to  his
wife,  "Hmmm...Now that's an interesting suggestion.  What if  we
get them all together in one large hall, and he can meet them all
at once?"
 "Now, now, Graham," she answered, "We can't afford to antagonise
them too much.  We might provoke a war - or,  at least,  a  trade
embargo."
 "But would we?" Wye butted in,  "I mean,  judging from our  bank
balance,  we're  at least as powerful as most of the  governments
there.  And  it doesn't have to be an insult - we  can  encourage
them to think of it as just a new way of doing business."
 "How?" she asked.
 "I'm  not sure - let me think..." Wye stood awhile  in  thought,
his  brow becoming progressively more creased,  until,  "Got  it!
Invite them all to a top-level meeting,  then televise it without
telling them beforehand.  The larger,  richer countries  couldn't
take  offence without offending the small ones,  which will  make
them look small-minded and prejudiced to the folks back home.
 "Since the large countries are run by populism - as this country
was  until two days ago - then they couldn't afford to  do  that,
and would instead have to choose not to take offence."
 "Brilliant idea - if it will work."
 "It will," Deborah,  the psychologist, said, "Anything has to be
better than the circus-followed-by-secret-meetings technique that
used to be used."
 "Then  let's  give  it a try,  see if  it  works,"  decided  the
General.
 Preparations for the Ambassadors's Knees-up, as the introductory
meeting came to be called amongst the three of them,  were passed
to the Permanent Secretary at the Foreign Office to be arranged.
 The Foreign Secretary, like all other ministers, was a member of
the  now ex-parliament,  and was - of course - no longer  holding
that  position.   Indeed,  even  the  position  itself  had  been
abolished,   and   the  day-to-day  running  of  the   individual
government departments and ministries handed over - temporarily -
to their Permanent Secretaries, who had been given orders that no
changes  were  to  be made to the  operation  of  any  department
without first obtaining permission from the General.
 The  Permanent  Secretaries,  of course,  were happy  with  this
temporary  arrangement.  As Graham had pointed out:  to  a  civil
servant,   'temporary'  was  simply  an  alternate  spelling   of
'permanent,'  and preserving the status quo was their major  goal
in  any event.  He had actually chuckled at the thought  of  what
their reactions would be when they learned of their new masters's
plans.
 The  Foreign Office Permanent Secretary initially  attempted  to
disregard the directions sent to him as to how the affair was  to
be  conducted,  but was soon convinced - in a  heated  discussion
with  the  General which had lasted less than five minutes  -  to
accede.
  Or,  to  put it another way,  to resign - leaving  the  Cabinet
Secretary to take over his responsibilities,  such as they  were.
In  this one action,  Wye destroyed the power of the Foreign  and
Commonwealth  Office.  A  month later,  the FCO  itself  entirely
ceased to exist.

                              *****

 With the arrangements made for the Ambassadors's Knees-up,  Wye,
Graham and Deborah  were free to handle the most important  event
of that third day: a meeting with a small group of communications
engineers,  computer networking specialists,  civil engineers and
materials scientists.
 Their  aim was to sketch a preliminary design for  the  national
Network which Wye had mentioned in his broadcast of the  previous
night - but a Network substantially different from,  and far more
powerful than, the network which Wye had described on television.
 "Okay, first things first," said the General at the start of the
meeting,  "Which  of  you  gentlemen  is  the  telecommunications
specialist?"
 A  large,  heavily-built man hesitantly raised his hand.  At  an
inquiring look from Wye, he said, "John Osbourne, General."
 Wye  gestured  the  title  aside,  "No  formalities  -  call  me
'Absolaam,' please. That goes for all of you," he added.
 Turning now to Osbourne,  the General went on,  "The Network I'm
after  is  to  provide a network  of  fibre  optics,  electricity
transmission cables and water pipes. I want any suitably-equipped
computer to be able to feed signals into,  and read signals from,
the  fibre  optics  using radio  receivers  and  transmitters  at
reasonable  distances along the length of the cable,"  he  paused
for breath, "The question is," he went on, "Can you do it?"
 "Well,  Gen...Absolaam,  I  mean..." Osbourne  began,  nervously
pulling  at his red goatee,  "As far as the fibre optics  go,  it
depends what kind of speed you want,  how large the network is to
be,  and how much money you're willing to spend on it," he  said,
apologetically.
 "Money  isn't a major issue," Wye replied,  "But let's take  two
hundred  billion pounds as a starting figure,  shall  we?"  There
were  some starts from the group around the  General,  then  some
pensive   expressions  as  they  considered  the   problem   more
seriously,  when Wye continued,  "The Network is to be accessible
nationwide - regardless of where you are,  it should be  possible
to  send  a  signal to any other place in  the  country  via  the
network."
 There  were  more  encouraging nods now,  and even  one  or  two
satisfied smiles from the engineers,  as Wye went on, "And as for
speed, I want the fastest possible response time and the greatest
throughput of signals conceivable - it should,  ideally,  be able
to  handle  and redirect millions of separate messages  to  their
required destinations, all at the same time."
 "I  don't know about the speed thing," John Osbourne  said,  "It
sounds  like  you're going to require a dozen - or  a  couple  of
dozen - supercomputers as well as some kind of optical device  to
handle signal boosting and redirection..."
 Wye broke in, "Optical device?"
 "Yes," Osbourne said, standing up, "You see, the biggest loss in
speed comes in converting a light pulse to an electrical pulse to
be  manipulated before being boosted in the required  direction,"
by  now,  his arms were gesticulating windmill-style as he  waved
and  gestured to enhance his explanation,  "In  this  case,  that
could involve it being converted into a short-wave radio signal.
 "The  way around this is to use optical devices - use the  light
pulse itself instead of the electrical signal. The only problem,"
he shrugged, apologetically, "Is that I don't know of any optical
systems  fast  enough  to handle the  number  of  signals  you're
contemplating."
 "I  do," an optics specialist piped up,  drawing  their  various
attentions,  "A colleague of mine developed an optical receiving,
switching  and boosting system about...oh,  must be four or  five
years  ago now.  He couldn't get the funding to go much beyond  a
prototype, but if money is no longer a major factor...?"
 "It isn't," said Wye, shortly.
 "Well,  then,"  Julie  Robins,  the optics specialist  went  on,
happily,  "There shouldn't be a problem - his prototype  operated
at terahertz speeds..."
 "Sorry?" asked the General, "What does that mean exactly?"
 Robins considered a moment,  before replying,  "Put  simply,  it
means  that  it could accept,  switch or re-transmit ten  to  the
fifteen  signals  per second - that's around," her  brow  creased
momentarily  in  concentration,  "A hundred  and  twenty  million
megabytes per second - that's using just a single optical  fibre,
of course," she added.
 "Of course," Wye added,  sardonically. He went on, "I think that
should be fast enough - have a word with your colleague and we'll
sort out funding after this meeting.  Well," he went  on,  "Since
the  fibre optics don't appear to cause any major problems,"  his
questioning glance at Osbourne was answered in the affirmative as
that  scientist re-seated himself,  so he carried on,  "The  next
item is the electricity transmission cables.
 "I  was thinking of using superconductors," he  began,  but  was
stopped  by an interruption when Michael Banting,  the  materials
scientist   present,   coughed  loudly  to  draw  the   General's
attention.
 "Not a good idea,  Absolaam," said Banting,  "Not a good idea at
all."
 "Why  not?"  asked Wye,  puzzled,  "I thought  it  would  remove
wastage through heat loss, and so cut down transmission costs, to
use superconductors for power transmission."
 "It  would,"  said  Michael,  "But not enough to  matter  -  the
resistance of cold copper cable is quite low enough for practical
purposes.  The problem with using superconductors on that kind of
large scale lies in the cryogenics."
 "The what?" asked Wye.
 "The cooling system," explained Banting,  "What kind of  cooling
system were you thinking of using?"
 "I thought a pipe affair," Wye said,  "With liquid helium sealed
inside the pipe."
 "Better  to use liquid nitrogen," Michael broke  in,  "It's  not
quite so cold - and there's a hell of a lot more of it around, so
it's easier and cheaper to manufacture in the kind of  quantities
you'd need. And you'll need some sort of insulation jacket around
it as well."
 "I  was  thinking  of  a  vacuum  around  the  ceramic  pipe  of
superconductor," answered the General.
 Banting thought a moment,  then, "Pressure release valves - when
the  coolant  heats up,  becomes gaseous,  then  you'll  need  to
release  the  pressure,  Absolaam,  or there'll  be  an  almighty
explosion."  General Wye nodded,  then Michael went on,  "In  any
case,  you don't want to use superconductors for this - trust me,
you don't."
 "I'd  rather not just take anybody's word for anything,  Mike  -
Would you mind explaining why not?"
 "Of course not,  Absolaam," nodded Banting,  "The basic reason -
even leaving aside the cryogenic problems - is...Well,  when  you
pass too much current through a conductor, what happens?"
 "It heats up. I think," added Wye, after a moment's hesitation.
 "But with a superconductor,  what happens is that - at a certain
threshold  value  - it suddenly loses its  superconductivity  and
releases one Hell of a lot of heat.  We call it 'quenching,'  but
we're not quite sure yet why it happens," he said, unhappily, "We
only  know  that  it's something to do with  the  magnetic  field
generated by the current."
 "Bring it up at the meeting tomorrow,  Mike," said the  General,
"Maybe somebody would like to research the question."
 "I would," Michael Banting said, smiling.

                              *****

 The  eventual  design consisted of  a  heavily-insulated  copper
cable,  along the top of which would run a bundle of 4096  fibre-
optic filaments,  in a 64x64 array,  which terminated in a  thick
black disk, roughly the same diameter as the bundle of fibres.
 The disk was to contain a combination of optical and  electronic
devices - using the optical technology suggested by Julie  Robins
as  far as possible - and was intended to double as both a  radio
receiver/transmitter  and as a booster for the signal carried  by
the fibres.  Below the main electricity-conducting tube would run
a plastic pipe to carry water supplies.
 When a signal was received by the radio,  it would be translated
and  transmitted  down the fibre.  When a signal from  the  fibre
reached the black box, one of two things would happen. If it bore
an identification number the same as that of the black  box,  the
signal would be translated and re-transmitted as a radio  signal.
If it bore no such encoded number then the signal would simply be
boosted along to the next black box.
 The  plastic  to  be used for the water pipe was  to  be  impact
resistant,  provide  a reasonable level of insulation to  prevent
ice  formation,  and be capable of expanding and  contracting  in
rapidly-changing  temperatures  without  fracturing.   The  inner
surface  was  to  be treated so as to  prevent  the  build-up  of
limescale deposits which could choke the pipe.
 Each  primary unit - from black box to black box -  was  roughly
ten metres in length,  and each unit could be individually sealed
off  and replaced quickly and easily if there were  any  problems
with it.
 This  explanation  sounds  more  complicated  than  the   system
actually was.  In fact, the engineers agreed that this system was
the  simplest  one  capable  of performing  all  of  the  actions
required  of it by the General and his associates -  the  primary
function being that the system,  once installed,  should  require
only a bare minimum of maintenance.
 The  Network designed during the course of that  single  meeting
was  essentially  that  which  was  eventually  built.  The  only
significant modification made was one suggested a couple of  days
later  by  the  electronics  engineer assigned  to  draw  up  the
blueprints for the black boxes.
 That engineer suggested adding physical input and output sockets
to  every tenth primary unit,  in order to supplement  the  radio
receiver/transmitter - to allow physical connections to computers
to be made more easily.  His suggestion earned him a substantial,
five-figure,  bonus  to  his  salary -  after  all,  it  was  the
intention of the new government to encourage innovation.
 Since  the  network  was  to cover  the  whole  of  the  British
mainland, and installation was to be completed within a year, the
undertaking would be extremely expensive.
 All agreed,  however,  with the General's earlier statement that
two hundred billion pounds would certainly cover it.
 The  two  hundred  million pounds to be used  in  improving  the
insulation of each building connected to the Network - and  every
building  was  to  be connected - had barely  the  status  of  an
afterthought.
 At  one point - in response to an engineer who stated  that  the
hardest  part would be to ensure that the  contracting  companies
did  not cut corners to widen their profit margins - the  General
just bared his teeth and said,  "Just leave that part of it to me
-  there'll  be  no cutting of  corners."  At  these  words,  the
engineer shuddered,  recalling the massacre televised a scant two
days earlier.

                              *****

 After  the  technical meeting,  Wye,  Deborah  and  Graham  were
extremely  relieved  that they had only an official  function  to
attend before they could get some much-needed rest.
 By  the  time  the  hour came round to  travel  to  the  Olympia
exhibition  hall,  where Deborah had finally decided to hold  the
event,  they  had each changed into whatever clothing  they  felt
most comfortable in.
 Deborah chose to wear a black, low-cut evening dress, with pearl
earrings  and  necklace,  and a stark white handbag -  while  her
husband was wearing a light blue suit with a dark shirt and light
tie.
 General Wye's choice of attire was, perhaps, the most eccentric,
since  he  had opted to wear a faded red T-shirt and  a  pair  of
comfortable  - and most definitely casual - light blue  trousers.
Wye's choice of footwear, also, was somewhat unusual. In contrast
to  Deborah's red flat heels ("My ruby slippers"),  and  Graham's
sober black shoes, he wore a pair of aged trainers - the left one
of which had a partially-detached heel which flapped slightly  as
he walked.
 "You're not wearing that to this function?" asked  Graham,  when
he saw the General's outfit.
 "Why  shouldn't  I?"  replied the General,  with  an  wide  grin
spreading  across his face,  "After all,  it's supposed to  be  a
casual affair."
 "Well, yes. But 'casual' in diplomatic circles..."
 "I  know  what you mean - but I think that I should start  as  I
mean to go on."
 "Perhaps we should change also,  Graham?" He looked shocked, for
a  moment,  at  the suggestion,  then was himself  amused  as  he
considered the impression the three of them would make.
 "No," interrupted Wye, before Graham could answer, "I think that
would be a bad idea just at the moment."
 "Might I ask why, Absolaam?"
 "Because, Deborah, it might be better if your connection with me
- publically,  that is - didn't become too obvious too  soon.  By
simply  being high-ranking civil servants,  you might  very  well
find out more than you would if you were seen to be with me."
 "Hmmm - Yes,  you're right, General," agreed Graham. "Perhaps we
should arrive separately as well?"
 "I  didn't like to suggest it myself," said Wye,  "But  I  think
you're right about that.
 "We must,  all three of us,  keep our eyes and ears open and our
minds sharp tonight.  I don't think it would look good if I  were
seen  to be playing favourites with any particular  country,  but
I'm going to have to allay any fears that any of them might have.
 "So  - intelligence gathering and sounding out the mood  of  the
diplomats is going to have to be the job of the two of  you,  I'm
afraid."
 "I concur completely,  Absolaam," nodded Deborah,  "We will take
the first car,  then you can follow on fifteen to thirty  minutes
later, okay?"
 "Fine by me. I'll see you two there, then."
 Graham and Deborah left together,  to take a car to Olympia. Wye
waited,  and  became quite impatient by the time his own car  was
ready to take him - even though it was only half an hour later.

                              *****

 "General  Wye,   Dictator  of  the  British  Isles,"  came   the
announcement at Wye's entrance. The hall buzzed with astonishment
at the frank nature of the title,  which Wye had decided on at  a
whim  when  the  doorman  had  asked how  he  would  like  to  be
announced. He liked the sound of it.
 The  newly-titled  Dictator  stepped down  towards  the  nearest
diplomat,  extended his hand, and - smiling - asked which country
he represented.
 The diplomat gave his answer - "Spain,  Dictator" - and a fairly
innocuous - and very short - conversation followed,  during which
Wye  conveyed  the  key  facts  that  he  hoped  that  diplomatic
relations  would remain cordial between their  two  nations,  and
that trade would not be affected by the change in government.
 This  simple pattern was repeated throughout the  evening,  with
only minor variations.
 Wye was particularly amused to note that,  of all the  diplomats
present,  only  one  expressed any surprise at either  Wye's  new
title or his style of dress.
 That one was,  of course,  the US Ambassador to the Court to St.
James,  who was more amused than shocked,  saying, "I admire your
candidness, Dictator, in the title you've chosen."
 "It's a title pro tem only,  Ambassador," replied Wye,  smiling,
"I intend to institute Democracy within the next two decades."
 James  Seymour,  the  US  Ambassador,  raised  his  eyebrows  in
surprise,  "Really?  Surely  you  mean  'reinstitute  democracy,'
Dictator?"
 "Not  at  all," replied Wye.  For a moment,  he  considered  the
Ambassador more carefully.  A young-looking middle-aged man,  the
General  thought,  with  good muscle-tone and a  rather  handsome
face.  Like  a slightly older version of  Michaelangelo's  David.
"And,  please, call me 'Sol,'" At Seymour's questioning look, Wye
explained: "It's an old Army nickname - short for 'Absolaam.'"
 "Thank  you,   Sol,"  the  ambassador  replied.  Catching  Wye's
appraisal of him, James Seymour placed his hand on the Dictator's
left shoulder,  "Please call me 'James,'" he hesitated a  moment,
then leaned in,  conspiratorily, before adding, "Or 'Jim,' if you
prefer."
 "Very  well,  Jim,"  Wye half-bowed.  For  a  moment,  he,  too,
hesitated.  Then,  deciding,  he said, "If the question interests
you,  perhaps  you  would care to join me in a drink  after  this
affair?" he added, a slight strain showing in his voice.
 "I would be delighted, Sol," said the ambassador, beaming.
 "Thank  you,  Jim."  Wye glanced to his right  and  saw  Deborah
gesturing  to him to circulate,  so he added,  "Must circulate  -
I'll see you later tonight.  Just tell your driver to take you to
Number Ten Downing Street."
 "Sure,  Sol.  I'll look forward to it," replied Seymour, smiling
transparently as Wye moved off through the crowd.
 The  rest  of  the mis-named  'Knees-up'  passed  in  monotonous
sameness,  with standard greetings,  introductions and platitudes
all round.

                              *****

 Later  on that evening,  General Wye was sitting in his room  in
Downing Street when a soft knock sounded at the door.  He  smiled
in apprehensive anticipation before,  at his call of, "Come!" the
door opened and James Seymour walked in.
 "Your  doorman  said to come straight  up,"  Seymour  said.  His
glance,  as he closed the door behind him,  took in the splendour
of  the bedroom.  He allowed his eyes to linger a moment  on  the
magnificent four-poster bed and flick quickly from the bed to Wye
and back again before coming to rest on the General.  He  smiled,
in a friendly fashion.
 "Care  for  a drink,  Jim?" asked Wye,  as he poured  himself  a
bourbon.
 "Whatever you're having will be fine, Sol."
 Wye brought the glasses over to James, who had seated himself on
a small two-seater sofa at the side of the room. He handed one to
Seymour, then sat down.
 "Neat Jack Daniel's!" exclaimed Seymour in surprise,  "You  must
have read my mind."
 The General smiled innocently as he asked,  "Wasn't my preferred
drink listed in my CIA file then, James?"
 "No,  it  wasn..."  Seymour pause,  then turned to look  at  the
General. "Okay, you caught me," he smiled, sheepishly.
 Wye  nodded,  "It's  okay.  After all,  I made sure  of  reading
Intelligence files on all of the diplomats before attending  that
party. I figure everybody else did the same thing."
 "Did  my  file make interesting reading,  Sol?"  asked  Seymour,
raising his eyebrows.
 "Very,"  said the General.  He placed his drink on a side  table
then  leaned towards James's face,  brushed his lips against  the
other's.
 James  dropped his glass and swore softly,  but  leaned  forward
himself  to  join  with the General.  The  kiss  was  breathless,
lasting  only a few seconds but seeming more lengthy to  each  of
them  as  Wye released  all the tensions of  the  previous  three
days, and the frustrations of a life time, into a single action.
 Wordlessly,  they  parted and,  together,  moved across  to  the
large,  inviting bed.  They reclined,  coming together once again
for a passionate kiss as they lay beside one another.  Absolaam's
arms  embraced  James,  caressing his back gently  before  moving
upwards to the back of his neck,  pulling him forward,  deepening
the kiss.
 As  his  own  arms embraced James,  Wye felt  hands  pushing  to
separate  them.  James's hands.  Wye almost broke off  before  he
realised what James was trying to do, then he moved his body back
a  little  to allow James access to his  shirt.  Skilled  fingers
unbuttoned the General's shirt,  then stole inwards to stroke the
thick,  dark hair of his chest. James's other hand reached around
Wye,  under his shirt, stretching to his back to pull the General
back into the full embrace.
 Both  Absolaam and James were breathing heavily as they  removed
each other's outer clothing, their heads spinning.
 Wye  could feel a faint buzzing behind his ears as  his  fingers
pulled  roughly  at  the zip of  Seymour's  fly,  Seymour's  hand
already  reaching the last button of Absolaam's own - now  moving
up to unbuckle each other's belts.
 Fingers,  cold and gentle,  reached inside to softly squeeze the
General's arousal. A gasp, then each was wearing only loose boxer
shorts.  Wye broke off the kiss at last,  his head moving down to
James's chest - as smooth and bare as his chin.
 He kissed first one nipple. Moved his mouth across to the other,
his tongue leaving a wet trail between the two,  cold on  James's
bare skin. A thin trickle of saliva drained down the well towards
Seymour's stomach, where Wye descended, and descended.
 The General took the elastic roll of James's shorts between  his
teeth,  moving  his head ever downwards and dragging  the  shorts
from him in one smooth,  certain movement.  At the same time, Wye
felt  James's  hands  gently and deftly removing  his  own  boxer
shorts.  The hands lingered for a moment to caress his  buttocks,
cupping  them gently,  one finger tracing the divide to his  anus
and penetrating slightly for the instant of a kiss.
 Wye's  moved  back up along his lover's legs,  seeking  that  he
might find the rigid cock before his eyes,  small and thick, with
mounds  of fierce black hair,  shocked with  grey,  covering  the
balls at its base.  A moment's sweet feigned reluctance,  then he
had it.  His tongue traced its length as his teeth closed  gently
over the dome, pinching it slightly, and without force.
 Slowly,  his head began to move up and down,  his tongue  moving
more  rapidly from tip to balls to tip to  balls,  caressing  the
sack  and tasting the salty sweat that gathered there as  James's
hips  bounced  in a matching rhythm,  his hands clutched  now  in
Absolaam's  hair,  forcing him to move his head ever up and  down
and  again,  with  teeth moving and  tongue  caressing,  sliding,
slipping,  halting,  starting,  lips pressing and squeezing  with
hands on buttocks.
 As  he felt the tension start to gather in earnest,  Wye  pulled
back completely, then quickly moved up to Seymour's face, kissing
him  fiercely  and with gay abandon,  tongue  deep  and  probing,
Seymour  tasting  the  salt  of his  own  sweat  and  pre-cum  in
Absolaam's mouth.
 Understanding  the game,  Seymour descended,  taking Wye in  his
mouth.  Probing, licking, teasing, touching, pressing, squeezing.
They rotated,  clumsily, on the bed, each taking the other's cock
in their own mouth, holding off as long as they could until, with
a  final sharp embrace they came together,  tasting  the  other's
saltiness coursing into them,  filling their own mouth with their
lover's  life  beyond  all hope  of  swallowing,  until  the  cum
overflowed down their faces.
 Quickly,  they exchanged one more deep kiss,  exchanging  fluids
again,  before  falling  back  together  -  both  exhausted  and,
paradoxically, rejuvenated.
 Eventually,  James  broke the silence - hoping to learn more  of
the  Dictator's  plans:  "What were you saying  about  democracy,
Sol?"
 "Huh?  Oh,  you  mean  back at the party?"  the  General  pulled
himself  together,  then began,  "I was saying that I  don't  say
'reinstitute   democracy'  because  Britain  has  never   had   a
Democratically  elected government.  That's 'Democratic'  with  a
capital 'D,' by the way."
 "Fascinating. And what brought you to this conclusion, Sol?"
 "Quite  simple.  In my view,  Democracy exists only  when  every
person's vote is both freely and rationally cast.  The individual
must have sufficient information to reasonably make a choice  and
be  sufficently intelligent to absorb and understand  the  likely
short-, medium- and long-term implications of their choice."
 Seymour  broke  in,  "Does this mean that an  intelligence  test
would be a requirement before receiving the franchise?"
 "Not at all.  It is one of the government's responsibilities  to
provide  an education system capable of teaching people to  think
for themselves - in effect, to question everything.
 "One of the problems with the old system of government was  that
the  people's decisions were based on irrationalities -  such  as
party  loyalty - or were motivated by short-termism of the  worst
kind."
 "So  you  believe  that everybody can be  taught  to  think  for
themselves  -  that intelligence is  teachable?"  asked  Seymour,
becoming fascinated.
 "No.  Not everybody," Wye shook his head, sadly, "Even excluding
the mentally ill,  I think that there are,  have been, and always
will be stupid people. What I hope to do is to educate sufficient
numbers of people to be able to think for themselves - to analyse
and  question everything - that the sheer weight of numbers  will
ensure that the government's decisions as a whole will be ones of
enlightened self-interest."
 "Really?"  Seymour  was silent for a moment,  before  he  added,
"Then  you  would  say that the United States  does  not  have  a
Democratic system?"
 Wye  smiled,  "I wondered how long it would be before  you  said
that.  Yes,  you're quite correct.  In fact,  I'd go further:  No
country, so far as I am aware, has ever tried to govern itself in
a Democratic - with a capital 'D' - fashion."
 "It  sounds  like an fascinating  experiment,  Sol,"  then  came
another small pause before, "I hope you can make it work."
 "So do I,  Jim, so do I. I'm not entirely sure that I can," this
time  it was Wye's turn to pause,  before changing  the  subject,
"I've just remembered, James. Could you do something for me?"
 "I'll try my best,  Sol," he gave a hearty laugh,  which sounded
oddly false to the General,  before adding, "Depending on what it
is, of course."
 "I'm looking for posts in industry for the previous government -
I'd rather get them out of the country, you understand?"
 James  raised himself up onto one elbow,  so that he could  turn
and  look  Wye directly in the face.  For  the  first  time,  the
ambassador looked extremely surprised. He said, "You mean they're
still alive?"
 "Certainly,"  Wye  said,  "I'm not a  murderer,  you  know,"  he
managed to look offended - but privately wondered whether Seymour
had seen the staged 'massacre' the night before last.  He decided
that the ambassador had almost certainly watched both broadcasts.
 He  had,  but  managed to  answer,  smoothly,  "Of  course  not,
Dictator...Sol, I mean...You just took me by surprise there for a
moment."  He started to gently rub the tip of  his  smooth-shaven
chin with the tip of the index finger on his right hand.
 "I think," Seymour said,  after a while,  "That I can find  them
some sort of management positions. How many will be needed?"
 "Oh - about a dozen, if you can manage it," said Wye, yawning.
 "No  problem,  Sol  - you just leave it with me and I'll  be  in
touch later in the week."
 With these words,  James stopped rubbing his chin, and moved his
hand  across to Wye's chest,  making small circles in  the  thick
hair. He leaned over to kiss the General once more, but Wye - now
sleeping - made no response.
 The US Ambassador to the Court of St James carefully got up from
the bed, dressed as quietly as possible and left to make a report
of the General's words to his government,  before returning  home
to his wife.
 He was careful not to report his activities with the General  to
either his government or,  for reasons which are obvious,  to his
wife - though Mrs Seymour knew more than her husband guessed.
 As  for the former,  James Seymour knew only too well  what  the
reactions  to  homosexual  acts would be in  the  US  government,
particularly now that a fundamentalist Christian was once more in
the White House.
 And James Seymour did not want to lose his job.

                              *****

 It  was  a fine winter's night.  A little cold,  but  not  quite
snowing.
 People  were walking through the streets,  others  were  driving
their cars. For some reason, they paid no attention to the figure
of General Absolaam Wye, who walked among them.
 Children played by the side of the road,  laughing and giggling,
and  sometimes looking up at the traffic lights and  watching  as
they changed colour.
 In a power station over a hundred miles away,  a drama began  to
unfold as a surge of current was produced.  Despite all  attempts
to  damp  the  current - in spite of the  safety  systems  -  the
current left the station barely abated.
 The  Network  was  momentarily  overloaded.   Since  it  was   a
superconductor,   the  overload  affected  all  portions  of  the
Network's cabling virtually instantaneously.
 It was then that the superconducting ceramics quenched.
 Quickly,  and without warning,  the traffic lights went out. The
lights in the shops and houses went out,  the street lights  went
dark,  and  the  muzak  coming from  the  late-night  supermarket
slammed to a sudden end.
 The  quenched  superconductor dumped heat into  the  surrounding
pipes all along its length - melting and warping the fibre  optic
cables.  Turning  the  contents  of the water  pipes  into  steam
throughout the country.  Water pipes which,  already weakened  by
the  sudden  surge  of heat,  were not designed  to  contain  the
scalding steam.
 The sound started,  a rumbling in the earth beneath their  feet.
People  stood  around,  with bemused looks on their faces  -  all
aside  from one man,  who had just come back from his holiday  in
California.  He  shouted,  "Earthquake!" and dove to lay  himself
flat on the ground.
 An explosion. Another. Another.
 The cars bucked as the tarmac cracked and rose in a ridge  along
the street,  geysers of boiling water and scalding steam spurting
from the cracks in some places,  gathering into scalding pools in
others.
 Men and women, seeing their neighbours' clothes catching alight,
ran  in  horror,  but the ridges,  cracks and the  boiling  pools
surrounded  them on all sides.  Flesh melted from exposed skin  -
tearing off in long,  bloody strips wherever the boiling water or
sharp,  ceramic  daggers made contact with  hands,  arms,  backs,
legs. Faces.
 And  Absolaam Wye knew,  knew with a cold certainty,  that  help
would never come. The fibre-optic communication lines were melted
or broken, and nobody could even call for assistance.
 The screaming would never stop.
 The screaming. The screaming.
 Wye awoke and heard screaming.  A disquieting sound at any time,
right now it heightened his fear as he leapt from his bed and was
racing  to the window before he recognised his own voice  in  the
screams.
 Hours later,  he managed to return to his sleep - chanting, over
and over again,  the mantra of his earlier decision to use copper
cables, and not superconductors, to transmit electricity. 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.