Skip to main content
© Atomic Flash

Chapter Nine

                   "The very basis of the Judeo-Christian code is
        injustice...How can justice possibly be served by loading
     your sins on another? Whether it be a lamb having its throat
      cut ritually, or a Messiah nailed to a cross and 'dying for
                                                     your sins'."
                   --Robert A. Heinlein,
 Job: A Comedy of Justice

 Before the ethical philosophers left the meeting,  one of  their
number  asked  the General just why there had been  no  religious
authorities present.  "After all," he said,  "At every meeting to
discuss  the ethics of scientific research which I've taken  part
in,  there have always been speakers from the  Christian,  Jewish
and Muslim religions."
 Another of the philosophers broke in,  "Yes - and usually  there
have been two or three Christian speakers. To represent different
factions of Christianity," he added.
 Yet  another interrupted,  saying,  "You've forgotten about  the
Hindus  and  the  Buddhists  - they're  often  present  as  well,
particularly when the debate is about particle physics."
 "Gentlemen, gentlemen," Wye said, gesticulating for them to slow
down. A cough from one side caused him to add, "And lady," rather
hastily,  before going on, "I will be meeting with the leaders of
all of the religions followed in this country.  But I will not be
meeting with them until tomorrow,  and I will most definitely not
be discussing the ethics of scientific research with them.
 "In fact," and here Wye's grim smile broke into a glorious  grin
which  furrowed the philosophers's brows.  "I very much doubt  if
any  of  them will be very pleased after our  meeting  tomorrow."
Some  of the ethicists broke into a sweat at these  words,  while
others  made mental notes to contact their priests and rabbis  as
soon as they reached home.

                              *****

 "Are  you  sure that this is a good idea?"  asked  Deborah  over
breakfast the following morning.
 "Hmmm?" queried Wye, not even trying to talk around his mouthful
of hot, buttered toast.
 "This meeting today,  with those," she paused with an expression
of distaste on her face,  "Religious leaders. Is it a good idea?"
she added.
 The Dictator,  his toast swallowed, answered, "No. But, frankly,
I can't think of a way to avoid it. If we are to succeed, we have
got to eradicate organised religion.  And this,  Deborah,  is the
only way I can think of to do so."
 "It's been tried,  General," Graham said,  shaking his head, "In
the  former Eastern Blok countries,  they stamped it out  and  it
just went underground.  There will always be people who will  die
before  giving  up their religion - and  their  'martyrdom'  will
encourage others in their own beliefs," he added.
 "I agree with my husband here,  Absolaam.  You won't be able  to
stamp out religion.  Even if it appears to vanish,  it will  only
come back stronger than ever once we relinquish power."
 The Dictator listened to the couple,  a benevolent smile on  his
face.  Calmer than they had ever heard him before,  he said, "I'm
not going to stamp out religion.
 "I'm going to encourage it." At their puzzled looks, he went on,
"A wise man once said that the surest way to show up a fool is to
agree with him.  I'm going to put that to the test and  organised
religion  is  going to be hanged - with itself  as  the  hangman,
while I merely stand by and pass out free rope."
 The  Dictator  grinned his now-famous grin as  he  surveyed  the
worried faces before him. Quelling their objections with a motion
of his hands,  he concluded,  "Look,  when we come to the meeting
just back me up.  Agree with me and follow my lead.  I'm  placing
six  billion pounds a year on the line here,  and I think that  -
with a little luck - it will work.
 "Oh,  and,  Deborah  -  I'll  need to  have  your  three  little
programming  friends perform a task for me after  breakfast.  Can
you get hold of them, please?"
 "Of course,  Absolaam.  But what, exactly, do you have planned?"
Deborah asked.
 General Absolaam Wye,  absolute ruler and Great Dictator of  the
British  Isles,  just  carried on grinning around a  mouthful  of
almost-charred bacon.

                              *****

 "Gentlemen,  gentlemen," the General began,  once the  religious
leaders of the country had assembled, "Perhaps we can begin now?"
he asked.
 As the packed room settled down,  Wye surveyed the faces  before
him.   There  were  representatives  from  twelve   'traditional'
Christian  churches,  three  islamic groups,  four  divisions  of
Judaism,  two forms of Hinduism,  various Buddhist monks - across
the  spectrum from taoists to Confucianists - and  almost  thirty
representatives  from  other religions;  from  Scientologists  to
Satanists, and Moonies to Mummuites.
 Including  the Humanist,  agnostic and  atheist  delegates,  the
cabinet  room  was crowded by a swarming mass  -  slowly  seating
itself  -  of  sixty  religious  leaders  from  sixty   different
religions,  most of whom proclaimed that their religion alone had
access  to the Divine Truth,  and all who claimed otherwise  were
heretics.
 About the only ones in the room who were not vehemently  arguing
with their neighbours were the Taoist,  three of the four  jewish
leaders and the non-fundamentalist Hindu leader. Wye noticed that
all   of  the  fundamentalists,   whatever  religion  they   were
representing, appeared to be close to striking blows.
 The  representative  from rabbinical judaism  was  berating  the
follower of Mummu; the Christians were arguing amongst themselves
and   were  studiously  ignoring  the  Satanist   and   Luciferan
representatives,  while  the  islamic  leaders -  with  only  one
exception  -  were  heatedly  debating  which  of  their  various
interpretations of the Qu'ran was the legitimate one.
 Perhaps 'debating' is too mild a word.
 At  a word from Wye,  the room settled down into a mild  murmur,
after various protests from - for example - the Christian leaders
that  the  Satanists were represented,  or from  the  leaders  of
'major  world  religions' that 'cults' such as  Scientology  were
permitted to be present.
 Once  the  room had quietened down sufficiently for  him  to  be
heard, the General, spoke.
 "I would like everybody who represents a religion with assets in
this country
 of one hundred million pounds sterling or greater to
move to the left side of the room.  Everybody else,  move to  the
right  hand side,  please." Wye waited as two men walked over  to
his  left,  and  the rest moved to his right  before  turning  to
address the head of the Roman Catholic church in England,  Andrew
Clarksen.  "I  think  you've made  a  small  mistake,  Monsignor.
According  to my records,  your church owns or has access to  six
hundred  and  seventeen point one two million  pounds  through  a
variety of business fronts."
 The  Monsignor coughed nervously before  speaking,  "I'm  afraid
that  you  must be confusing the Church's assets  worldwide  with
those in the British Isles, my son."
 "Not  at  all,  Monsignor  - the assets of  the  Roman  Catholic
church,  worldwide,  are..." Wye grinned as the Monsignor hastily
moved across to the left side of the room.
 The Dictator addressed the three to his left first,  "The assets
of  your  churches,  as  you will discover when  you  leave  this
meeting,  have  been  entirely confiscated," over  their  shouted
words of protestation,  Wye went on,  "Entirely confiscated. That
includes only monetary assets,  of course - your property remains
your own."
 Wye paused a single beat before continuing, "The same applies to
every  religious group in this country.  All assets,  liquid  and
material,  have,  with the exception of real estate,  now  passed
into the ownership of the government."
 On  hearing Wye's words,  the glee of the rest of the  gathering
turned  quickly to abhorrence,  and their protests rapidly -  and
noisily - joined those of their three colleagues. Only the taoist
seemed  aloof  from  both sets of emotions  -  simply  listening,
quietly  and  without showing emotion,  to all of  the  General's
words.
 The  racket  came to a halt only when they heard  the  General's
next  question,  "I  take it you all saw my broadcast  on  Monday
evening?" The silence was deafening,  as the General went on,  "I
think it is safe for me to assume that you did.
 "Now, there's no need to dwell on that broadcast. Not just now,"
he added, grinning again.
 "If I can finish,  then?" A chorus of nods and other indications
of  willingness to listen followed from all  those  present.  All
save the Taoist representative, that is.
 "The  reason  I separated out your three  colleagues  here,"  he
gestured  towards  the  three  seated  to  his  left,   "Was   to
demonstrate the winners and losers in the new situation."
 To  their  puzzled  expressions - echoing those  of  Graham  and
Deborah  only two hours before - Wye explained,  "Each  religious
body which is represented in this room is to be allowed access to
an  account,  donated by the government,  of one hundred  million
pounds per annum."
 I've  hooked  them,   thought  Wye  on  seeing  their  looks  of
excitement,  Now to reel them in.  Aloud,  he said, "Those moneys
may  be  spent  in any way which the leaders  of  the  individual
churches see fit - but be warned that the details of each account
will be published at the end of every year.
 "At that time, an extra one hundred million pounds will be added
to each account.  Note - that amount will be added to the balance
of  the  account every year,  regardless of whether  or  not  the
previous contents have been used up.
 "The  only losers here are the religious bodies  represented  by
the three gentlemen on my left.  Even they are not really losers,
if  they  stop to think about it,  since  their  current  account
balances  would  not bring in one hundred million a  year.  Am  I
right?" he asked.
 There was a long pause before reluctant nods of assent came from
the gathering.  All, again, except for the taoist representative,
who  simply sat in deep thought all the while that  the  Dictator
had been speaking.
 Eventually,  one voice - the Satanist,  Wye thought,  though  he
couldn't be sure - piped up, "What's the catch?"
 Wye grinned his second grin this time - his predatory grin -  as
he replied,  "Simply that I will expect each of you to provide  a
guidebook,   within  the  year,   detailing  the  creed  of  your
particular  religion,  with special care taken to  explaining  in
which  ways  your beliefs differ from those of all of  the  other
religions in this room."
 "What do you want these guides for?" a voice asked.  This  time,
Wye thought that the voice belonged to Monsignor Clarksen,  but -
again - he could not be certain.
 His response was simple,  and abrupt,  "The reasons, if any, for
my requests are none of your affair.  I trust," he added with one
of  his  patented wicked grins,  "That will not  be  a  problem?"
Remarkably, there was a chorus of acquiescence from the room.
 The General paused a moment to look over the room, which - while
slightly  agitated - was still relatively  calm.  Here  goes,  he
thought,  saying  out loud,  "Now,  only one thing remains to  be
done.
 "In one week's time,  there will be a change in the laws dealing
with sex, censorship and drugs. These laws will be liberalised.
 "All  drugs will be made available for sale to anybody over  the
age of sixteen,  with complete and accurate information as to the
effects of the drugs being supplied with them.
 "More  pertinent to you gentlemen," here Wye appeared to  single
out  the  Christian  and  Muslim  delegates,   "However,  is  the
liberalisation of the censorship and consensual sex  laws.  These
are all to be repealed immediately."
 The  uproar  from the representatives of the  several  sects  of
those  two religions was incredible.  Spluttered shouts  of  "You
can't  do  this!" and "What about the children!"  came  from  the
floor,  with  the  various  leaders of both  of  those  religions
getting  to  their feet and waving clenched fists in the  air  in
shock  and horror.  One or two of them actually started  to  move
toward  the General,  ready to do violence,  but a look from  Wye
soon removed that possibility.
 When  the room had calmed down slightly,  the General  went  on,
unperturbed,  "I  thought  that  some  of  you  might  take  that
attitude, and so I prepared a small demonstration for you."
 Turning  to  Deborah,  the General asked her to call  her  three
young programmers in. They entered, pushing before them a wheeled
trolley on which were four piles of computer  printout,  arranged
as two sets of pairs.  In each pair,  one pile was hugely thicker
than the other one.
 General  Wye  rose to his feet and walked over to  the  trolley,
sixty-five  pairs  of  eyes swivelling to  follow  him.  When  he
reached  the trolley,  he indicated one of each pair of piles  in
turn,  saying,  "This,  gentlemen,  is a computer printout of the
whole of the Bible, both the Old and the New Testaments, and this
is the Qu'ran, in its entirety.
 "Earlier  today,  these  three young men," the wave of  his  arm
indicated the programmers behind the trolley, "Performed a simple
deletion on these two volumes. They deleted all of the references
to sex and violence,  but," and here the General had to shout  to
make  his voice heard,  "But they were careful not to delete  the
prohibitions
 against violence.
 "In  short,  they applied rigid rules of censorship -  as  those
laws now stand - to the two Holy books of the two religions which
are most set on upholding those laws.  The printouts beside  each
book  show  its size after these deletions have been  made."  The
piles  beside  each of the uncut versions were each  roughly  one
quarter the size of the originals.
 The  General,  seeing their reservations,  and  perceiving  that
another outburst was in the offing,  quickly continued,  "Let  us
take the Bible - specifically, the Old testament - as an example,
since that is a book revered by Christians and Muslims alike.
 "Genesis obviously has to be almost entirely removed - what with
the  nakedness of Adam and Eve being on display in  Chapter  Two,
Noah stripping himself naked in Chapter Nine,  the implied incest
of Eve and the explicit incest of Lot and his daughters,  spelled
out  in graphic detail in Chapter Nineteen - not to  mention,  in
that same chapter,  Lot's offering his two virgin daughters to be
raped in exchange for his own life.
 "Adultery  is frowned upon so out goes Genesis Chapter  sixteen,
verses  one  to four,  and Onan's coitus interruptus  in  Chapter
thirty-eight,  of  course,  has to  go.  Elsewhere,  the  graphic
pornography  of  - for example -The Song of Solomon,  has  to  be
deleted entirely.
 "Turning  now  to  violence.  Genocide,  of  course,  cannot  be
condoned,  and so the flood gets kicked out, along with the Sodom
and Gomorrah story.
 "Incidentally,  moving  away  from Genesis  for  a  moment,  the
genocide of the first-born of Egypt, the Amorites of Heshbon, the
followers of Og,  the people of Jericho,  the  Makkedah,  Libnah,
Lachish,  Gezer,  Eglon,  Hebron,  and the surrounding areas, the
people of Gaza,  Askelon and Ekron,  the massacre of ten thousand
Moabites,  'All the hosts of Sisera,' the one hundred and  twenty
thousand  Midianites,   the  Philistines,   the  Ammonites,   the
Amalekites..."
 Seeing  the  pale faces of some of the  religious  leaders,  Wye
paused,  then said,  "Well,  anyway.  All of these massacres  are
unacceptable in literature which may be read by children,  so  we
lose  most  of  contents  of  the  books  of   Exodus,   Numbers,
Deuteronomy,  Joshua,  Leviticus, Judges, the two books of Samuel
and the two books of Kings."
 "Just a moment,  Dictator," same an eager voice.  This time, the
General could see that it was Charles Crowley, the Luciferan, who
was  speaking.  Crowley,  not  even trying to keep the  sound  of
gloating  from  his words,  said,  "I realise that  the  Biblical
scholars amongst us already know of these massacres but,  for the
benefit  of those who do not,  would you care to list the  books,
chapters and verses?"
 "I would be happy to,  Mr Crowley," replied the General,  "But -
since  you are so eager,  perhaps you would prefer..." he  added,
with a questioning look.
 "Certainly,  Dictator," said Crowley,  happily.  Several of  the
religious  leaders  pulled  out  pencil and  paper  to  note  the
references  for  future  use as he  said,  slowly  and  by  rote,
"Deuteronomy chapter two,  verse thirty-four,  and chapter seven;
Numbers twenty one,  verses twenty-five,  thirty-four and thirty-
five;  Joshua  six;  Joshua ten,  twenty-eight to  forty;  Judges
chapter  one,  verse four and verses eighteen  to  nineteen,  and
chapter three,  verse twenty-nine, as well as chapter four, verse
sixteen, and chapter eight, verse ten."
 Crowley pause for breath,  then continued,  "One Samuel, chapter
eleven,  verse  eleven,  and  chapter  fourteen,  verses  twelve,
thirteen  and  twenty - also chapter  fifteen,  verses  three  to
seven. You'll also find the book of Numbers, chapters twenty-five
and thirty-one,  interesting," he added,  smiling gleefully, "Oh,
and the polygamy in one Kings eleven and two  Chronicles,  eleven
and  thirteen,  is also enlightening,  in light of the  Christian
insistence on monogamy."
 "Thank you,  Mr Crowley," Wye broke in,  to try to slow down the
flow of the Luciferan.
 To  no  avail,  as Crowley continued,  "King Saul  strips  naked
before Samuel,  in one Samuel nineteen,  verse  twenty-four,  the
better  to  receive the Word of the Lord;  King David  -  in  two
Samuel eleven - behaves like a Peeping Tom;  Saint Paul advocates
castration  as  the only alternative to celibacy  -  even  within
marriage  - in one Corinthians seven,  and Jesus advocates  self-
mutilation  in the fifth chapter of St Matthew's  Gospel,  adding
with apparent approval - in chapter nineteen, verse twelve - that
'there  be eunuchs,  which have made themselves eunuchs  for  the
kingdom of heaven's sake.'"
 "I said 'Thank you,  Mr Crowley,'" Wye repeated. Crowley finally
- and reluctantly - came to a halt,  "Now, to move on, then," the
General  said,  "Passages such as Psalms one hundred  and  thirty
seven,  which  states,"  Wye quickly looked up the verse  in  the
uncut  printout  - it didn't appear in the much  slimmer  version
beside  it,  of  course,  "'Happy shall he be,  that  taketh  and
dasheth thy little ones against the stones.'
 "Well,  that's  just not on - and as for the tale of  Elisha  in
Chapter two of the second book of Kings,  verses twenty three and
four.  Well,  would any of you here approve of the massacre -  by
bears - of forty-two children for the 'crime' of taunting a bald-
headed  man?" The Dictator glanced around the room taking in  the
shaking of heads with receded hairlines.
 "I'm glad to see that you don't," the General went on. "Perhaps,
then,  I've made my point,  and need not labour it further.  I am
offering all of you here a straight choice. I will either enforce
the current censorship laws rigorously,  which means that I  will
apply  them to your own Holy books,  or I will  liberalise  those
laws completely.
 "The choice is yours. In the hallway outside you will find sixty
copies each of the censored text of the Bible and the  Qu'ran.  I
suggest that you study them,  and I will expect your answer  this
time next week.  Oh,  and the Christians amongst you will  notice
that   one  of  the  first  casualties  of  censorship  was   the
crucifixion in the New Testament," Wye  grinned,  happily,  "It's
far too gory for the consumption of children.
 "If  you  are  concerned at this  stark  choice,"  Wye  grinned,
maliciously,   "then   consider   the  words  of  the   book   of
Ecclesiastes,  chapter three:  'To every thing there is a season,
and  a  time to every purpose under the heaven.'  Gentlemen,"  he
concluded, "The time for censorship is over.
 "Now," he said, curtly, "Go."
 As the religious leaders, some shell-shocked and some elated but
almost  all astounded by what they had heard,  filed out  of  the
cabinet room,  the General motioned for the taoist monk to remain
for a moment.
 When the room contained only the monk,  the General,  Graham and
Deborah,  Wye  addressed  the taoist,  "You did not  seem  either
enthusiastic  or concerned about my plans.  Might I ask why  this
might be?"
 "You  may ask," the monk replied,  "But you may not  receive  an
answer." He paused a short while - which felt like an eternity to
Wye,  though  he recognised that he should not try to hurry  this
small man's speech.
 Eventually,  however, impatience got the better of him. Striving
to  keep  that impatience from his  words,  though,  Wye  quietly
asked, "You know what this meeting meant, do you not?"
 "I do."
 "And you remain unconcerned?"
 "Your Way is your own - mine is for myself alone."
 The monk turned to leave.  As he reached the door, Deborah asked
him, "What did this meeting mean?"
 "The  Way of your Dictator is that of the Tar  Baby,"  explained
the monk before he departed. From beyond the still-open door, the
three of them heard the monk chuckle softly to  himself.  Deborah
thought that she heard the word "Ringer" come from that direction
also, but couldn't be certain.
 "Now what," Graham,  closing the door to the Cabinet Room, asked
Wye, "Was that supposed to mean?"
 The General laughed,  long and loud,  before answering,  gasping
for breath,  "It means," he said,  his chest heaving,  "That that
taoist  monk understood exactly what I did at that  meeting,  and
exactly why I did it.  I don't think,  though," he added, warily,
"That  any of the others realised what was going on.  At least  I
hope they didn't."
 Deborah took Wye's left arm and Graham took his right as the two
pushed  him up against the wall and demanded,  "What the fuck  is
going on?"
 Wye still couldn't stop laughing. The only intelligible words he
managed to get out were, "Read your," then, after another bout of
hysterical laughing, "Uncle Remus."
 The  fifth day in power ended with the Dictator unable  to  take
part  in  any further meetings,  due to his being  overcome  with
laughter  at the thought of the solemn,  and extremely  grateful,
faces of the religious leaders.
 Every time those faces came to mind,  he doubled up in hysterics
once again.
 And when the thought, They were grateful for the donation passed
through his head, he almost pissed his pants in hilarity.

Chapter Ten

              "They sailed away, for a year and a day..."
                          --Edmund Lear,
 The Owl and The Pussycat

 Before  that first week ended,  Graham set up a group to make  a
start   on   developing  a  reliable   reusable   ground-to-orbit
spacecraft.  "The  accent," as he put it,  "Is to be on the  word
'reliable.'  We  do not want a repeat of the  NASA  space-shuttle
idiocy,  where  half the craft needs to be replaced before  every
mission."
 He  also started a team of engineers working on the design of  a
space  hotel:  "A  hotel,  gentlemen.  It is to pay  for  itself,
eventually,  as a luxury hotel.  Bear in mind,  however,  that it
will need to be built on Earth and shipped to - and assembled  in
- orbit.  Also remember that it will also be required to act as a
refuelling waystation for interplanetary ships and probes."
 Deborah,  meantime, had her hands full with organising her three
programmers as they installed a dozen super-computers - at a cost
of  close to one billion pounds - to handle the bank accounts  of
the  nation.  They  needed at least a dozen because  they  wanted
speed,  even  when  the National Network was linked  through  the
machines.
 As  for  the Dictator himself,  his major concern was  with  the
education system. Before being able to tackle that area, however,
he had first to run another, somewhat different, gauntlet.
 "What are you going to do about the crime rate?" was a  frequent
question  -  and eventually he agreed to chair a meeting  of  the
'law and order' lobby.
 Wye's  answer - to the consternation of the questioner  and  his
audience - was,  "Nothing." When the howls of protest died down a
little,  he asked,  grinning widely,  "Why?  What do you think  I
should do?"
 Answers  were  many and varied,  running the entire  range  from
imprisoning  more  criminals,   through  birching  and  the   re-
introduction of the stocks,  and on to - of course - flogging and
hanging.   The  words  'prevention'  and  'rehabilitation'   were
noticeable  only  by their glaring absence  in  the  overwhelming
number  of  repetitions of the word  'punishment,'  'punishment,'
'punishment.'
 Wye  also noticed that the language being used by those  present
was almost as uniform as the suits or blue rinses worn by all who
were  present:  'terrorising the community' was one  phrase  used
often  to  describe   what criminals were  doing  -  another  was
'mugging old ladies.'
 Yet  a  third oft-used phrase was 'it's the only  language  they
understand,' while the words 'discipline,' 'short,  sharp  shock'
and  'national service' were also bandied about  with  depressing
frequency.
 The  General  waited  until somebody mentioned  that  crime  was
'bringing  down the house prices' before he waved the crowd  into
silence and said,  slowly and distinctly,  "Nothing you have said
has  convinced  me either that your views are desirable  or  that
they work in practice."
 There  was  a minor uproar at these words,  but it  was  quickly
quelled as Wye went on,  "For thirty years," he said,  getting to
his feet,  "For thirty years the legal system has been  following
the course you suggest - becoming ever more extreme as time  went
by. What has been the result?
 "I'll  tell you!" he shouted,  slamming his fist into  the  desk
top,  "The  crime rate has moved upwards and  ever  upwards.  The
problem,  people, is that you are addressing only the symptoms of
crime - not their causes."
 "I  suppose  you want us to pamper criminals and  send  them  on
holidays abroad!" came the mocking call of a heckler.
 Wye looked in the direction from which the cry had came,  "Don't
be ridiculous," he said, witheringly, "I have already said that I
will do nothing specifically to tackle crime.  I will make you  a
promise here and now, however.
 "If,  five years from now, it is still not safe to walk anywhere
in  the British Isles without fear of being mugged,  then I  will
step down as Dictator.  You can believe that promise or  not,  as
you choose - but I will abide by it."
 "What  do you mean by 'mugged?'" the heckler called  again,  but
this  time  Wye ignored the cry and merely dismissed  the  right-
wingers.
 They were seriously boring him by this time - and,  besides, Wye
wanted  to  move  on to what he considered to  be  the  important
business of the day: reforming the education system.

                              *****

 "The first thing I want you to do is provide a pleasant  working
environment  for both teachers and students," Wye  said.  He  was
addressing a gathering of organisers of pre-school schemes.  "You
should,  by now, be aware that the term 'pre-school' is no longer
appropriate - all children will start their education at the  age
of three, and will continue until at least the age of twelve."
 "Twelve, Dictator?" asked a stout man in the second row.
 "Yes:  twelve," Absolaam said, "Though that particular age limit
does not apply as yet - the requirement is for a minimum of  nine
years of education under the new system.
 "Strictly  speaking,  this  means that those who  are  currently
fifteen years old will remain in education until they are twenty-
four.  Since that is impractical,  the upper limit for compulsory
education  is twenty years of age.  Beyond that age,  people  can
continue their education or not, as they decide.
 "I  suspect that most will decide to continue their  education,"
Wye grinned.
 "Any  particular reason,  Dictator?" asked the same  stout  man,
after   noisily   blowing  his  nose  into   a   crumpled   white
handkerchief.
 Wye grinned a while longer,  then added,  "Yes - By the time the
extra five years have passed,  the advantages of their  education
should have become apparent to those students.
 "Incidentally," the Dictator continued,  "You will notice that I
do not use either the word 'children' or 'pupil,' but instead use
'student.' I wish that this word be used in common practice  from
now  on,  since it carries with it connotations of  studiousness,
studying,  and so on - associations which the other words do  not
have."
 The  meeting continued in a similar vein for a  while,  and  was
followed  by a number of other gatherings,  each addressing  what
were essentially the same points,  with head teachers of  primary
and secondary schools, sixth form colleges and technical colleges
- then there were, subsequently, meetings of the vice chancellors
of various polytechnics and universities.
 In every such meeting, the importance of philosophy, psychology,
science  and  technology  and ancient and  modern  languages  was
stressed.  In each gathering,  particular emphasis was placed  on
the environment in which the students were to work.
 And at every turn, money was provided to pay for renovating - in
some  cases,   rebuilding  -  school  buildings,  buying  in  new
textbooks and apparatus and paying the wages of the new influx of
teachers.
 The  eventual total,  which was close to one hundred  and  fifty
billion pounds,  allowed for more than ten thousand pounds to  be
spent  for  each student in the system - with ages  ranging  from
three years upwards.
 The  school  environment  itself  underwent  a  drastic  change,
particularly  at the junior and secondary  school  levels.  Walls
were repainted - if necessary, being rebuilt first - and wood was
replaced where necessary.  When it became apparent that plastics,
metals and composite materials were more appropriate than wood in
many situations, wood was unceremoniously yanked out and replaced
with the new materials.
 Graffiti  was  not  permitted to remain on walls,  but  -  in  a
deliberate  imitation  of an American experiment from  the  early
nineteen  nineties  - was to be removed within one  hour  of  its
being seen.  As in the US experiment, after a few months graffiti
virtually  stopped appearing in the walls when students saw  that
it was no longer a permanent fixture.
 Under  the  US experiment,  the new regime had been  dropped  as
'educationally elitist' when - after a little under a year -  the
more  highly-motivated students at the schools  participating  in
the  experiment began to dramatically outperform their  peers  at
neighbouring schools.
 In Wye's educational system, the 'experiment' continued.
 As  time  went by,  students began to take more pride  in  their
schools.  Not the narrow,  bigoted pride of a flag-waving  quasi-
patriot,  singing  Land of Hope and Glory in the Albert Hall  and
bemoaning the loss of the British Empire.  Rather, the pride of a
builder  looking  at a new bridge,  spanning a  deep  chasm,  and
saying to himself: I helped make that.
 In the newly-renamed pre-primary schools,  students were  taught
to read and write and perform simple arithmetic.  They were  also
introduced  to  philosophical and  scientific  techniques,  whole
areas  which  had  previously been thought  too  advanced  -  too
complex - for such young children.
 Despite  the  expectations  of almost  everybody  -  except  the
Dictator   and   the   majority  of   child   and   developmental
psychologists  - those three year olds took to  these  'advanced'
disciplines  as though born to them,  which in a sense  they  had
been.
 It is a common enough trait in young children that they ask vast
numbers of eventually-irritating questions about the world around
them  - Why is the sky blue?  and What is 'atmosphere'?  and  the
like.  In the ordinary course of events,  these questions will  -
after  a while - receive snapping non-answers,  and the child  is
discouraged from asking further questions.
 Now,  however,  each child had access to a teacher - or  several
teachers  - whose job was to either provide an answer or  -  more
usually  -  to  guide the child in reasoning  out  then  checking
possible answers to their questions.
 Why  is  the  sky blue?  no longer received  the  sharp  retort:
Because it is! Instead, the question led through a maze of topics
covering water droplets, white light, prisms, the atmosphere, the
weather  and on and on until the question multiplied  tenfold,  a
hundredfold - even a thousandfold.
 Most  children  quickly caught on that reading was  the  key  to
finding  their  own  answers - their key to a  small  measure  of
independence  - and thus made their first,  hesitant steps  along
the  road  of knowledge.  By the time the  National  Network  was
completed  - and all human knowledge made available at the  touch
of a button - the entire process became even simpler than child's
play.
 But that came later.

                              *****

 After  the jitters of the first week,  the world  stock  markets
settled down somewhat.
 Initially,  of course,  share prices fell and the notional value
of the pound sterling dropped dramatically.  Once it became clear
just how wealthy Wye's government was,  however,  both shares and
the pound began to move upwards.  Stockbrokers, it has been noted
elsewhere,  have no national loyalties - the pledge they swear is
to Mammon, not Britannia or Lady Liberty.
 Slowly at first,  then accelerating. By the end of 2004, the FT-
SE  index  exceeded  - for the first time -  a  value  of  twenty
thousand.  At the same time,  the pound sterling was - briefly  -
possessed  of a notional value just short of fifteen US  dollars:
six point three seven Deutschmarks.
 But that, too, was to come later.

                              *****

 The censorship,  drugs and consensual sex laws were repealed  on
Saturday,  the fourth of December,  1999 - exactly one week after
the meeting with the religious leaders.
 To  everybody's  surprise  bar  the  Dictator's,  the  organised
religions - almost without exception - raised no fuss and  caused
no  uproar.  The  sermons  preached on that day  and  during  the
following  weeks urged restraint in the face of  temptation,  but
did not protest the change of the laws themselves.
 The three exceptions were a muslim fundamentalist group and  two
of  the christian churches,  the Scottish Presbyterians  and  the
Methodists.  Their protests were heard, but - aside from a couple
of  Sunday supplement articles - hardly listened to beyond  their
own limited congregations.
 The  new  drug laws specified that all substances which  may  be
taken  into the human body - such as  alcohol,  tobacco,  heroin,
opium,  cocaine,  LSD, and other mind-affecting pharmaceuticals -
had  to  devote  fully  two thirds of  each  advertisement  to  a
detailed account of all figures relating to potential and  actual
harmful and beneficial effects of the product.
 This information was to include notes on the addiction and death
rates,  if any,  of users and abusers, as well as details such as
the percentage of the population which had proven to be  allergic
to the substance and other information about scientific trials of
the  product  - with the trials having to be  carried  out  under
government supervision.
 Alongside  this  information,  manufacturers were  compelled  to
display  prominent  notices  of  the  percentage  purity  of  the
product, and lists of all additives, with their effects and side-
effects listed also.
 As  a result of these strictly-enforced regulations,  it took  a
full month for the drug laws to show their initial effects,  with
Acapulco Gold cigarettes going on sale alongside British American
Tobacco's other products.
 A  slick advertising campaign followed and,  by the end  of  the
first month,  existing heroin addicts were buying their fix  from
the local off-licences at prices far below those they were paying
before.  The number of burglaries, muggings and violent crimes in
the country dropped appreciably.
 A  little  over  one year later,  the new laws on  the  sale  of
'controlled' substances were extended to cover all  food,  drink,
their  ingredients  and  additives,  as  well  as  all  domestic,
commercial and agricultural chemicals and emissions.  There  were
several  protests from the industries concerned,  but these  were
soon quelled.
 Decades later, historians were to argue vehemently about whether
the  calming of the multinationals involved had more to  do  with
the fact that the extension had been requested by consumers -  or
with the meetings which the 'Captains of Industry' concerned  had
with  the  Dictator.  Meetings from which most were  observed  to
emerge with corpse-pale complexions.  That particular controversy
was never satisfactorily settled.

                              *****

 The  new  censorship and consensual sex laws  were  rather  more
rapid in producing an effect.
 The  brothels - which quickly appeared in a great many  towns  -
did  incredible amounts of business in the first weeks,  and  the
new  'hard  core'  pornography television  shows  initially  sent
viewing  figures through the roof.  In the first  twelve  months,
soft-porn magazine sales declined massively.
 Once  the novelty had worn off,  however,  the television  shows
found  their audience tailing off significantly as  the  populous
grew accustomed to their content.
 The  market,  it was found,  could sustain only three 'just  for
men' programmes, a single 'just for women' channel, two hard core
shows  designed for couples and one 'speciality'  channel,  which
devoted  shows  to  the minority activities  -  from  homo-erotic
striptrease to spanking, foot-fetishism and sub-dom activities.
 Perhaps surprisingly, the 'women-only' channel proved by far the
most  popular  of all these - consistently  generating  the  most
advertising revenue.
 After five years had passed, most towns in the country supported
one brothel - but it was difficult to find a town which had  more
than  one.   And  almost  impossible  to  locate   street-walking
prostitutes in any town.

                              *****

 Just as April the twelfth had become Gagarin Day, a national day
of  rest  and  celebration in honour of the  first  manned  space
flight, so July the twenty first, as the anniversary of the first
moon  landing,  had  also been renamed and proclaimed  as  a  new
national holiday.
 British  summers had been becoming hotter and ever  hotter  each
year  for over a decade.  Armstrong Day was hot in the  year  two
thousand - and not a dry heat, but a heat of such clothes-soaking
humidity  that people stripped down to shorts and  T-shirts  even
more readily than in earlier years.
 As  the heat went on,  men discarded T-shirts and,  outside  the
City,  there were no shirts or long trousers to be found. Even in
the City, jackets became very much optional.
 On Armstrong Day,  after two months of this heat, a twenty three
year  old woman decided that she,  also,  wanted to  discard  her
halter top. If the men can do it, she reasoned, then so can I. It
helped,  of  course,  that she was a policewoman - and  thus  had
received the new government instructions.
 Those  instructions consisted of a very clear reminder that  the
old 'decency' dress codes had been repealed.  'Indecent exposure'
was no longer an offence,  nor was walking down the street  stark
naked.  The  new  instructions  made it plain  that  anybody  was
entitled to wear anything they like - or nothing at all,  if they
so desired.
 At first,  a topless young woman attracted a great many stares -
some of admiration,  some of envy,  some of pure lust. Even, from
several rather sick and twisted individuals, stares of disgust or
- in extreme cases - hatred.  After a couple of days,  though, it
became  obvious  that - despite protestations to  the  police  by
those  same  sick and twisted individuals - no action  was  being
taken against this young woman.
 It was then that other women began to strip off.  At first, only
young  women - teenagers and those in their early twenties -  and
only  those who wanted to show off their bodies.  Within a  week,
however, most people were down to wearing brief swimming costumes
around the town, and about half of the women were topless.
 When full nudity started to appear on the streets,  it  actually
made  less of an impact than had the first  topless  policewoman.
For obvious reasons of mechanics,  however,  many more women than
men  went  totally nudist - the country's menfolk  were  not  yet
prepared,  en masse, to walk around a supermarket with an exposed
erection.
 Even that self-imposed restriction disappeared before too  long,
however,  as men began to grow ever more accustomed to the  sight
of naked female flesh - whether on their television  screens,  in
the   streets  or  walking  around  in  their  local  branch   of
Sainsbury's.
 Towards the end of August,  on a sweltering summer evening,  the
policewoman and her boyfriend-of-the-moment were browsing through
the sexual devices section of their local supermarket.
 "What about this?" she asked,  holding a foot-long dildo. It was
a  fluorescent  green  colour,  and a large switch  at  the  base
betrayed  it as being a vibrator.  The boyfriend shook  his  head
solemnly,  so  she put it down and reached across for a  pair  of
padded electric lips.
 The  policewoman never completed the movement because  that  was
the moment that the world exploded.
 Not the entire planet - merely that portion of it which made  up
the  supermarket.  The  world of everybody  in  that  supermarket
followed a uniform pattern at that instant of time:
 Heat. Light. Sharp. Stab. Pain. Pain. Pain. Pain.
 Blackness.
 The  fire bomb was not the first to explode - and  'credit'  for
the  sixty eight human deaths it caused was claimed by  the  same
group which had set the two previous fire bombs.
 The same group which would go on to set more.

                              *****

 As the first year of power drew to a close,  in November of  the
year  2000,   the  plans  for  the  space  hotel  were  close  to
completion,  the  National Network was all but finished and  work
had  started  on  building a prototype of  the  Phaelon  reusable
spacecraft.
 Professor  Colin  Simoney's particle accelerator was  not  quite
completed on time.  But,  then,  nobody had really expected it to
be.
 Sharon  Kelly and Graeme Skildon had managed to come up  with  a
reasonable  way  of utilising the Network  to  produce  computer-
controlled vehicles,  though levitation appeared - for the moment
-  to  be beyond them.  They asked for,  and  were  given,  fifty
million  pounds  to  produce a prototype  vehicle  -  which  they
expected to be ready within one to two years.
 The  crime  rate,  for  the first time  in  three  decades,  was
falling.
 Whether that was due to fear of the Dictator,  or to the cheaper
availability of the more addictive drugs,  was widely debated and
hotly contested - and was a frequent topic of late-night  current
affairs  programmes.  The latter was usually the  factor  decided
upon as the cause, particularly when - as the years went by - the
fear of Wye declined.
 More surprising to some, the rate of usage of the harder drugs -
in particular,  the opiates - increased only marginally, and then
began  to fall.  When ten years had gone by,  the only  range  of
opiates  to  be found in the country,  outside of  hospitals  and
hospices,  was  a government-subsidised product,  sold under  the
brand-name "Slow Death."
 A  year  after  it  started,  the  literacy  program  ended,  as
promised,  and the teachers - who had been re-trained during  the
year  - were ready to be re-assigned for the second phase of  the
education course.
 Thanks  to  the  number  of  highly-paid  and   highly-motivated
teachers  made  available - enough to allow special  coaching  of
those  with such difficulties as dyslexia - all people  over  the
age  of five,  bar a hard-core of less than  one  thousand,  were
functionally  literate.  Those so severely  mentally  handicapped
that  they were not capable of learning to read,  write  or  type
were not counted in that thousand, of course.
 At the time,  Wye said,  of those able but unwilling to learn to
read, "Fuck 'em."

                              *****

 By the end of their first year in power, Wye, Graham and Deborah
were ready to move on to phase two. 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.