Skip to main content
© Jinxter

 "If 'tomb' is 'toom', why isn't 'bomb' - 'boom'?"

         MUSIC REVIEWS - CDS, EPS, CD SINGLES, ET CETERA
                      by Richard Karsmakers
           (with a guest review by Joris van Slageren)

 The load of CDs and such has dried up somewhat,  or at least the
variety.  "Why?"  you may ask,  panic in your  voice.  Well,  the
answer  is  that  I  am  no longer  on  the  editorial  staff  of
"Avalanche" because I had voiced once too many my dissent at  the
other people's terrible English (that I had to correct each  time
-  tedious!) and the general low level of journalism (not that  I
am a good one,  but suffice to say the others were even  worse!).
When  I  wanted to get in the Dream  Theater  interview  featured
elsewhere in this issue of ST NEWS,  the senior editor found that
reason enough to,  well,  chuck me out.  Obviously, Dream Theater
were  too  much a faggot poser band for him (whereas  they  quite
evidently aren't).
 Anyway,  so I will be receiving somewhat less CDs,  and there'll
be  more  in this column that I actually bought myself  (or  even
borrowed).
 Hope you'll continue to like it nonetheless.  And if you  don't,
don't restrain yourself from adding to my funds so I can buy more
CDs <grin>.

EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP

ANATHEMA - PENTECOST III (PEACEVILLE / MUSIC FOR NATIONS)

 Jesus H.  Christ! (highly inappropriate vocal ejaculation in the
context  of this band)...40 minutes of new Anathema  material  on
this  mini-CD to smoothen up the fans for their  impending  "Rise
Pantheon Dreams".
 I  wouldn't say this is the most musical CD Anathema  have  ever
made. The songs are rather long-winded, leaning onto the pompous.
Topics  are  generally fairly doomey,  not as  dreamey  as  their
earlier  material.  But  sometimes  the songs  really  kick  some
serious butt.  And,  of course, there's a hidden bonus track: The
universally  acclaimed  "666" with its familiar  one-chord  sing-
along  structure  that is the most perfect concert  closing  song
ever conceived.
 Well,  it isn't exactly one-chord, but the lyrics are all three-
word: Six, six and six.
 Although I have to say "Serenades" and the "Crestfallen EP"  are
a  class better than "Pentecost III",  the latter  is  absolutely
necessary for the fans to buy.  It's deep, dark doom metal of the
kind  that  strikes  you  right  in  the  face  with  its  leaden
atmosphere.
 As a matter of fact, my own enthusiasm displayed here has caused
in me a need to play it again...right now...

LABERINTO - LABERINTO (VIP ONE)

 Very  much in the vein of Overdose is this new debut mini-CD  of
(Brazilian?) band Laberinto. The music is very similar, almost as
if  by the same band,  actually.  Only the percussion - they  use
native South-American instruments quite a bit there - is actually
better  than that of Overdose;  it's less similar  all-over,  and
jungle samples are used to add to the overall effect.
 Although  only  containing  only  about  17  minutes  of  music,
Laberinto's debut mini-CD is an interesting product.  The  vocals
are  not  like  Sepultura/Overdose but  quite  good  nonetheless,
though some of the vowel sounds come out in the same way as  that
stool pigeon in "Miami Vice" (Ziggy, isn't it?).

QUEENSRYCHE - BRIDGE (EMI)

 The  first  of  several Queensryche CD singles  to  be  reviewed
here, and probably not even half of the total amount of stuff EMI
have released over the last few months.  What we have here is the
same as "Part I" of the "I am I" CD single with the exception  of
the first track (which is "I am I" on the other,  of course,  and
"Bridge"   on  this  one).   It's  the  other  tracks  that   are
interesting,  though.  First there's "Dirty Lil' Secret",  a song
off  the  "Promised Land" session that was perhaps too  light  or
uncomplex  to be included on that album.  It's  not  particularly
remarkable,  though  typically Queensryche of course.  Second  we
have  "Real  World",  the  song Queensryche  contributed  to  the
Schwarzenegger  "Last Action Hero" film (which,  by  the  way,  I
enjoyed  very  much  despite the flop  everyone  says  it  was!).
Beautifully  orchestrated  with the aid  of  Michael  Kamen,  and
finally available for those fans who didn't want to buy the  full
soundtrack.  Last, but certainly not least, we find "Someone Else
(with full band)".  Although the original is stunning,  performed
on  "Promised Land" only with vocals and piano,  this version  is
about  3 or 4 minutes longer and none the less  impressive.  It's
not a simple remix or with instruments added,  it's really a  new
performance of the song. Awesome.
 A very interesting CD single.

QUEENSRYCHE - BRIDGE PART I (EMI)

 I believe this is a UK import,  and together with the next title
reviewed here comprises a kind of 2 CD single set. It starts off,
predictably, with "Bridge". The interesting bits are the extras -
three live tracks taped at the London Astoria gig on October 20th
1994.  The packaging also has five colour pics of the  band,  but
those are hardly interesting I think (who needs 'em?).  The  live
tracks  are  "Damaged"  (which  just so happens  to  be  my  fave
"Promised  Land" track!),  "The Killing Word" and "The Lady  Wore
Black".   The  latter  two  songs  are  performed  in  the   same
arrangements  as  those used during the MTV  Unplugged  sessions,
i.e.  a  lot  softer and less aggressive than the  originals  but
nonetheless much worth listening to.

QUEENSRYCHE - BRIDGE PART II (EMI)

 Let's  skip "Bridge" right away and get to the next  tracks.  So
here  we have live London Astoria versions of  "Silent  Lucidity"
(again in an "Unplugged" kind of version), "My Empty Room" (quite
beautifully  re-arranged,  almost unrecognisable except  for  the
lyrics) and "Real World" (quite an unexpected track, I would say,
and  well-played despite the obvious and quite deafening lack  of
orchestration).
 With   the  sole  inclusion  of  these  softer  tracks  in   the
Queensryche spectrum,  it seems to me that the band are trying to
get across more mellow than they really are. I hope this does not
bode too badly for the future.  The live tracks included on these
two CD singles have been excellently recorded and produced,  so I
hope it won't be too long until Queensryche do a live album again
(though I'd rather not have them include these six tracks because
that'd  mean  many  people  - including  me  -  would  have  them
twice...).

NIGHTFALL - EONS AURA (HOLY)

 Greek  metal  Gods  Nightfall  have,   while  the  world  awaits
breathlessly  their next full-length studio  effort,  released  a
warm-up  EP  by the name of "Eons Aura".  Almost  20  minutes  of
mystical   metal  in  the  typical  Nightfall  vein  that   won't
disappoint any of their dedicated followers.
 "Eons  Aura" kicks right off with the  amazing  "Eroding",  both
musically  and lyrically impressive,  and the  band  relentlessly
pursue that quality until the dying chords of the fourth and last
song, "Thor".
 Eroticism  and  spiritual experiences are the main  sources  for
Nightfall, setters of the Greek metal trend and proud carriers of
that flame.  This is an EP no progressive Atmospheric & Epic  War
Metal  fan should be  without.  Excellent,  intricate,  majestic,
moody...Nightfall!

VAI, STEVE - ALIEN LOVE SECRETS

 "Shut Up and Play Yer Guitar..."
 Thank god someone said this to Steve Vai after "Sex & Religion".
Let's  credit Steve for going back on the guitar without  vocals,
strictly "Passion & Warfare" style,  and giving the guitar loving
fraternity another silvery disc to drool over.
 Brian May once called Steve Vai "the genius,  the master of  the
space  age guitar" and he was quite right.  Apart from  the  fact
that  Vai  definitely knows his chops,  this EP has  some  really
heavy  and some really amazing stuff on it.  It kicks  right  off
with  "Bad Horsie",  a song that includes a stunning  variety  of
sounds made on a guitar,  including a horse neighing as well as a
horse  doing something (or having something done to it) that  I'd
prefer never to witness when having dinner.  In  another,  rather
experimental  song Steve amazed me by causing his guitar to  make
sounds like rain falling on a roof.
 Of  the others songs,  "Juice" is a bit ordinary  in  comparison
with the rest,  "Kill the Guy with Ball" is severely experimental
and "Tender Surrender" is a good blues ballad (even though one of
its  motifs  is much like a Stuart Hamm song).  A  totally  witty
song is "Ya Yo Gakk",  where Steve plays along to baby utterances
of his son Julian Vai (of who he's no doubt very proud).
 Although this EP contains no "For the Love of God" or "Rescue me
or  Bury  me"  quality  tear-invoking  masterpieces,   it  is  an
essential  addition  to  the Vai fan's CD  collection  (or  every
guitar lover's, for that matter).
 For  those among you who own a computer it might be worth  while
to  note that an interactive CD ROM of Steve Vai is  underway  to
"develop  your  guitar  musicianship and  individuality"  on  the
guitar.

CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD

BATHORY - OCTAGON (BLACK MARK/MFN)

 Yes,  the Quarton horde is back from the Venomian times in which
they were spawn,  flourished,  prospered and died. Bathory wanted
to  be the most extreme Satanic band with lamb  slaughterings  on
stage and all that lark, but somehow it never happened. I haven't
got a clue how Bathory sounded in yon olden days,  but right  now
they sound,  well,  enjoyable but a slight bit dated. When I hear
the  riffs I cannot make up my mind whether I like  them  because
they're  excellent  or whether they remind me of  something  good
that  I've heard before.  The bottom line is that I  like  it,  I
guess,  and it's extreme enough to be liked by the old fans ("eat
my shit, suck my dick", that kind of stuff).
 I don't know if Bathory should still exist,  but "Octagon" is  a
fine and rather extreme CD that I play quite a lot and like. Some
of  the  songs are quite good and have an  on-driving  riff/drums
rhythm  that tends to get the dirt out of the ol' hearing  ducts.
The  last song is a capable cover of Kiss' "Deuce".  Maybe a  bit
superfluous, but nice nonetheless, and heavier than the original.
 "Octagon"  is one of those CDs you play regularly  after  buying
but  then doesn't really leave much of an impression.  Though  an
admirable effort on Quorton's behalf,  it'll not be found on many
"top 10" lists at the end of 1995.

ESOTERIC - EPISTEMOLOGICAL DESPONDENCY (AESTHETIC DEATH)

 Slower than Cathedral,  more despondent than My Dying Bride, and
with  plenty of experimental sound effects thrown  in:  It's  the
music made by Esoteric that you get on the 89 minute double CD by
the name of "Epistemological Despondency". I can already hear the
critics  wailing,  "this is too much over the top" and  "this  is
actually very booooriiiing", but not to me it isn't. This British
six-piece  had made a chillingly haunting product that is  surely
worth  listening  to if ever you feel like jumping off  a  cliff,
stopping  an  Intercity train with your bald patch  or  generally
putting  an  end to a miserable life not worth  being  alive  in.
Depressive?  Sure!  Repetitive? Yes, maybe, but that just adds to
the positively entrancing experience as a whole.
 The  double CD contains only 6 songs;  a short one (less than  3
minutes),  a  long  one (over 7 minutes),  two really  long  ones
(12'38"  and  18'59") and two extremely long ones (20'29"  and  a
whoppin'  26'20").  Plenty  of  time  to  get  sucked  into  this
topotypal doom, played at a snail's pace but oh so enchanting!

FATES WARNING - CHASING TIME (METAL BLADE)

 Metal  Blade  have released a cross-segment of  Fates  Warning's
material previous to their latest CD,  "Inside Out", on an 78'00"
CD  by the name of "Chasing Time".  Well,  I am lying  here,  for
there  is  one  track  from  "Inside  Out"  on  the  compilation:
"Monument" (which is one of the finest tracks).  Much of the best
stuff  of the band can be found on  this  compilation,  including
"Guardian", "The Seventh Hour", "Eye to Eye" and "Point of View".
There are also some new tracks - or previously unreleased  anyway
-  in the form of "At Fates Fingers" (an instrumental version  of
"At  Fates Hands",  quite excellent),  "We Only Say  Goodbye"  (a
remix) and "Circles" (parts of which ended up, after the song was
scrapped,  in  "Outside Looking In" and "Shelter Me"  on  "Inside
Out").  There's not much to be said about this,  really.  It's  a
really nice compilation if you haven't got too much Fates Warning
stuff yet, but not worth getting for the three "exclusive" tracks
alone.  For  those wanted to get in touch with Fates Warning  for
the first time,  however,  it's quite perfect.  And it also makes
sure you have a 78'00" CD, which is quite something.

MY DYING BRIDE - THE ANGEL AND THE DARK RIVER (PEACEVILLE/MFN)

 One of the very best CDs to have been released so far this  year
is,  without a doubt, My Dying Bride's third full-length CD, "The
Angel  and the Dark River".  Over an hour of  beautiful,  moodily
melancholic  music is to be found on this digipack CD with  stoic
but tasteful artwork.
 Never  before has the band been produced as crisply  as  they've
been now. Never before did I hear the bass this well, and Aaron's
grunt  (that I liked) has been replaced by more  regular  singing
(that I also like).  Seven long pieces,  kicking off with the  12
minute "The Cry of Mankind",  pass the listener by.  Although the
last 3 minutes of that very long song are,  on the down  side,  a
bit  boring,  none  of the other many minutes on the  CD  have  a
boredom factor within the discernible.
 I  personally thought it would perhaps be a bit too much to  ask
of  this  band to release three excellent  albums  before  losing
inspiration,  but they have. And I think it shows a clear path of
evolution. It's still doomy as hell, but oh so beautiful...
 And for those who you who have missed out on the MDB  Collectors
Club  vinyl single,  which had the exclusive track "Sexuality  of
Bereavement"  on  it,  well,  that's on "The Angel and  the  Dark
River", too!
 Definitely the best CD of 1995 so far.

ON THORNS I LAY - SOUNDS OF BEAUTIFUL EXPERIENCE (HOLY RECORDS)

 All of you probably know I really like the stuff put out by  the
French label Holy Records. Septic Flesh, Nightfall and Elend were
among the greatest of yours truly's musical discoveries of  1994,
and  already they have released new material this year,  also  of
new and really interesting bands.
 A potentially interesting addition is On Thorns I Lay with their
album  "Sounds  of  Beautiful Experience".  It's  a  Greek  band,
labelled  by  Holy to produce (now get this)  voluptuous  forward
metal
 - a label open to all kinds of different interpretations. I
think  the words they should have used  (and,  indeed,  intended)
were sensuous and progressive,  and even that is not exactly what
On Thorn I Lay is like.
 "Sounds of Beautiful Experience" is not as well-produced as I am
used to from the Holy Records stable,  and although the songs are
fairly  promising with interesting breaks and changes of  rhythm,
the whole thing is put to shame by what is billed the most unique
about the band - its vocals.  Vocalist Steven almost whispers the
vocals  in what I assume must seem voluptuous  (or  sensuous,  or
whatever),  but it's actually, well, how do I say this with tact,
total crap.
 Hm...seems I am not too tactiferous after all (and,  now I  come
to  think  of it,  "tactiferous seems not even  an  English  word
though I like the way it rolled off my tongue, or at least off my
fingers).
 Sometimes he grunts or sings or shouts normally,  but most of it
is just horrible. A real shame. And his Greek accent is horrible,
too.  The  lyrics  are really pretentious,  which  in  itself  is
nothing  bad.  But his pronunciation is  really  awful.  Example:
/skeen/  instead  of  /seen/ for  the  English  word  "scene".  I
understand  it's the Greek way of pronunciation,  but I'd  rather
have them stick to Greek if they can't do decent English.
 On   Thorns  I  Lay,   if  produced  better  and  with  a   more
straightforward  vocalist  (I  am not saying  he  must  grunt  or
anything, but not this gruesome pseudo-horny whispering please!),
could do a lot better.  If they ever get a chance to do a  second
album,  I  hope  they'll  get  their  act  together  rather  less
pretentiously. It's not a bad album altogether, but definitely my
least  favourite Holy Records release after Misanthrope's  "Totem
Taboo" (which is also a bit sad,  as the main Misanthrope man  is
the  boss  of Holy Records and I do want to make them  feel  good
about  what  they're  doing  because,   as  a  whole,  they  most
definitely are!).
 You can't have 'em all, I guess.

ORPHANAGE - OBLIVION (DISPLEASED)

 One of the finest albums of 1995 so far,  together with that  of
My Dying Bride,  is Orphanage's "Oblivion".  And it's  definitely
one of the finer debut albums I've ever heard.
 I  forgot what Orphanage is labelled as.  I think  keywords  are
"progressive",  "Celtic"  and  "doom",  and I think  (although  I
honestly wouldn't know about the "Celtic" bit) that it's not  too
far off the mark.  What it boils down to for those of you who are
rather less into putting music in strictly defined categories  is
that  we have a six-piece here that combine an  interting  three-
layer  set of vocals (soprano/grunt/regular) with  awesome  riffs
that provoke head movement irrefutably.  Songs like  "Chameleon",
"The  Case of Charles Dexter Ward" and "Sea of Dreams"  are  true
classics  in  the  doom metal vein  with  interesting  interludes
between  the  flip-invoking heavier and  faster  passages.  As  a
matter  of  fact there are only two somewhat weaker  sections  on
this  CD  -  a really short one at the  very  beginning  of  "The
Collector" and the intro to "Victim of Fear" - and that's all.  I
think  this  is the most promising Dutch  release  since  Altar's
"Youth Against Christ" in mid 1994.
 The  one thing is that,  after one CD already (barring  the  two
demos  of which a fair amount of songs can be found on  the  CD),
they  have  a very recognisable sound that.  If repeated  on  the
second CD,  this might cause people to think they're rehashing. I
hope  this band will be able to make more than just  one  classic
CD.

PYOGENESIS - PYGOGENESIS (OSMOSE)

 This is Pyogenesis' debut album,  released in 1992. It's not old
enough  for  the  "Old  Stuff" column but I  did  want  to  write
something  about  this,  because  this is the  stuff  that  sends
shivers  down spines and right upto the nervous centre where  you
cannot but worship it.
 Pyogenesis is a death metal kind of band, I suppose, but they've
got good musicians,  additional melodious guitar work in the vein
of Nightfall,  and three vocalists (I know of only one band  like
this,  and that's Orphanage from the Netherlands,  and maybe Holy
Records' Elend).  One of the vocalists grunts,  one of them sings
normally,  and  there's  a siren-like female  singing  of  Martha
Gonzalez-Martin (Flower of Evil).
 Although  the  lyrics make little sense  (well,  they're  German
after  all...) the music is great and the effect of those  vocals
is heart-rending in a positive way.  This is stuff any doom/death
metal fan has to listen to at least once!
 One bad thing,  though:  The album is only slightly longer  than
half an hour.  You'd better get it at a 50% off sale (like I  did
<grin>,  and  where  I got Elegy's  "Supremacy",  Judas  Priest's
"Painkiller",  WASP's "The Crimson Idol" and Howe II's "Now  Hear
This" too).
 (Sorry about this bragging. Couldn't resist)

SEPTIC FLESH - E?O?TPON (HOLY RECORDS)

 In 1994,  my personal favourite album was Septic Flesh'  "Mystic
Places  of Dawn".  It was a progressively atmospheric  death/doom
metal  album that took further the path headed into by  Nightfall
by adding even more eerie guitar parts and using keyboards as  if
their lives depended on it.  Truly a beautiful album, and I can't
say the time until the release of their second album has been one
of easy waiting.
 On E?O?TPON (which means "the inner mirror",  "the inner view"),
some  more  accent is put on the metal  side  of  things,  losing
slightly  the  dreamy quality of some of  masterpieces  on  their
earlier album.  Having said that,  you will want to know  whether
E?O?TPON  is  better or not quite as good as  "Mystic  Places  of
Dawn". Well, to put it plainly, it is almost as good. I think the
thing on the down side is still the production.  Somehow I  think
the guitars don't need to sound the way they do; their distortion
could be much clearer.  The music doesn't sound bad,  not at all,
but it could have been better.
 Still, I think this is definitely one of the top three albums of
1995  so  far,  at  least as far as I  am  concerned.  They  have
retained  much  of  the  originality of  their  debut  album  and
traversed  further  on seldom trodden avenues.  The  final  song,
"Narcissim",  for example,  has rather very experimental segments
and  non-grunted  parts.  These guys surely  have  not  dedicated
themselves  to repeating the same thing all over again,  which  I
think required courage and inspiration.  I think they have  both.
And  what it boils down for me is that I've got another album  in
my collection that will be played quite often,  and that  already
stzarted to grow on me most fervently after having listened to it
about 3 times.
 Septic  Flesh are now down to two people,  and drums  are  taken
care of by Kostas (= Nightfall's Costas?).  I hope this will  not
prevent them from appearing on a stage some day,  for I'd give my
right arm to see these guys perform their stuff live.
 Check this stuff out or, er, be square.

SERENITY - THEN CAME SILENCE (HOLY RECORDS)

 I  don't  really know what to say about this  album.  Sure  it's
good, and it's produced very well, too. Serenity are from England
and it shows.  The lyrics are a bit more down to earth and - yes,
I know I am a bit of a sticker for that and it may be a fault  in
me - their English pronunciation is excellent.
 Serenity have written a handful of good songs but the bad  thing
about  them  is that they don't really lift themselves  from  the
grey mass.  They're not bad at all but they're not  exceptionally
good  either.  It's  just  a really decent album  that  makes  me
wonder,  very  much in the same vein I mentioned  with  Bathory's
"Octagon",  whether  anyone  will remember it in  another  year's
time.  I know this sounds really harsh,  for it's a good CD. It's
just that there is so much very good stuff available,  even  from
Holy Records themselves.

TRISTITIA - ONE WITH DARKNESS (HOLY RECORDS)

 Once more I have to say that the people of Holy Records are very
much at one line with my personal taste. Usually, anyway. Another
fine  example  of the talent the people of Holy have  managed  to
sign is Tristitia,  a Swedish three-piece this time. The music is
pure dark heavy metal with interesting acoustic guitar interludes
and vocals that'll make your skin crawl - sometimes rasping  like
a  chainsaw but always understandable,  sometimes almost  operaic
and sounding a bit like some of the Isengard songs. Production is
excellent,  and the compositions are heavy,  doomy, but also of a
quality  that  will remain with you after you turned off  the  CD
player.  I found myself in bed with "Kiss the Cross" in my  mind,
which is usually a very good sign of music being great (at  least
as far as my own taste is concerned, of course).
 A fine vocalist,  great songs and incredible atmosphere  signify
this  "extreme  dark  doom",   with  some  gothic  chanting   and
classical  instruments  thrown  in for  good  accord.  "One  with
Darkness"  is  an excellent album that all  worshippers  of  dark
metal with aggressive vocals will dig seriously.

VARIOUS  ARTISTS  - DEATH...IS JUST THE  BEGINNING  III  (NUCLEAR
BLAST)


 After  part I and part II,  Nuclear Blast have now released  the
double  CD  "Death...is just the beginning III"  -  an  excellent
slice of what they and their associated/befriended record  labels
have on offer.
 It is really a rare occasion when anything ending with "III"  is
any good.  "Jaws III",  "Amityville Horror III", "Halloween III",
"Friday  the  13th III",  "Rambo III"...they all sucked  the  big
one in a major way.  Actually, only "Indiana Jones III" ("Indiana
Jones  and  the Last Crusade") springs to mind  as  an  exception
(maybe together with "Wet, Wild and Willing III" <grin>). And, as
of now,  this brilliant double treat CD will have to be added  to
that  small list.  Tracks featured here include grade A  material
from Benediction,  Amorphis, Gorefest, Exit 13, Brutality, Septic
Flesh,   Cradle  of  Filth  and  Sinister,   whereas   previously
unreleased  tracks  can be found of,  among quite a  few  others,
Hypocrisy,   Meshuggah,   Mortician,   Pyogenesis,   Incantation,
Celestial  Season,  Acheron and Belphegor.  Only a few of the  36
tracks (>145 minutes of music) are actually bad. In this category
the  tracks by Meatlocker and Macabre definitely  belong.  Bloody
horrible!
 As a whole, I really don't think anyone could be disappointed by
this excellent collection of the deadest death metal this side of
Hades and Mayhem...

VARIOUS  ARTISTS - METAL MILITIA,  A TRIBUTE TO METALLICA  (BLACK
SUN RECORDS)


 In  the previous issue there was quite an avalanche of  "tribute
albums",  and  this time there's another album in  this  category
worth mentioning. This time Metallica is the 'victim', and it has
to be said that it's quite an excellent tribute album  indeed.  A
host  of  more or lesser known Swedish bands  (among  which  Dark
Tranquility  and Afflicted) play a variety of Metallica  classics
such as "Motorbreath",  "Fight Fire with Fire",  "Fade to Black",
"The  Thing That Should Not Be",  "Eye of the Beholder" and  even
"My Friend of Misery".
 Musically  everything  is exactly like one would  have  hoped  -
rough  and  aggressive versions of the originals  with  only  the
vocals  really making a change occasionally.  "For Whom the  Bell
Tolls",  for  example,  would  have  been better  off  with  less
'modern'  vocals.  "Fight  Fire with Fire"  is  very  interesting
because  it is played at at least twice the  regular  speed,  but
otherwise the versions are much the same to the way Metallica did
it, just much rougher and in-the-face.
 Together with "Nativity in Black" and "Smoke on the Water",  the
Black Sabbath and Deep Purple tribute albums respectively,  these
are the ones you should most be thinking of getting.

VIPER - LIVE MANIACS IN JAPAN (MASSACRE RECORDS)
(guest review by Joris van Slageren)

 Mix some Helloween and a lot of punk rock (for example  Ramones)
and  you  might end up with something that  sounds  vaguely  like
Brazil's  Viper.  Not  as well-known as their  fellow  countrymen
Sepultura,  the Japanese seem to like them just the same, judging
from  this  recording.  The tracks were recorded live  in  Tokyo,
Japan,  in  June 1993.  Most of the album has that nice  up-tempo
punk rock speed,  together with more melodious guitar stuff  that
makes a very listenable kind of music.  But on the other hand, to
be a major band they still have to make that step from average to
great that is hard for many bands.  In other words: Although it's
not  bad,   it  doesn't  have  that  little  extra   originality,
excellence  or  whatever  that sets a good  band  apart  from  an
average one.  The CD also features two cover versions, one called
"We  will  rock  you" and the other "I  wanna  be  sedated",  the
original versions of which are from two very famous bands that  I
don't  have  to mention.  In the CD booklet are black  and  white
photographs that show the usual live and back stage scenes.  Nice
if the price is somewhere in de mid-price range.

 More in the next issue of ST NEWS

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.