Skip to main content
© Bitman

 "A squirrel is just a rat with good PR."

                YOUR SECOND GFA BASIC 3.XX MANUAL
                             - or -
        HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING AND LOVE GFA-BASIC
                             PART 17
                     CHAPTER SIXTEEN - SOUND
                          by Han Kempen

Soundchip

 If you play a note on an instrument,  the volume changes in four
steps:

     Attack  - volume raises from 0 to peak
     Decay   - volume falls back to sustain-level
     Sustain - constant volume during playing of the note
     Release - volume falls from sustain-level to 0

 This can be drawn as a so-called ADSR-envelope with the time  on
the x-axis and the volume on the y-axis.  A typical ADSR-envelope
looks like this:

         *
        * *
       *   * * * *
      *           *
     *             * * * *
     |---|-|-----|-|------
       A  D   S   R

 Of  course things are never simple in the real  world.  We  will
assume  that a note has one sharply defined  frequency,  although
'real'   notes  usually  are  a  complex  mixture  of   different
frequencies,  each  with  its  own  ADSR-envelope.  That's  where
samples come into the picture,  but there they leave our  picture
again as we will stick to sounds of one frequency.

 The  soundchip  in  your  Atari  ST  can  use  eight   different
'envelopes'  that  are rather crude compared  to  ADSR-envelopes.
There  is  no Decay or Sustain,  and it even can be  argued  that
there are only two envelopes:

                                 |--| = envelope-period
                                    *
                                   **
                                  * *
     slow Attack, fast Release:  *  * * * *    (Attack-bit = 1)

                                 *
                                 **
                                 * *
     fast Attack, slow Release:  *  * * * *    (Attack-bit = 0)

 The envelope-period determines how long it takes to get back  to
volume 0.

 Some  envelope-variations  are possible by changing bit  0-3  in
register R13 of the soundchip:

     bit 0 (Hold)      - hold last volume (at end of first
                         period; overrides bit 1 and 3)
     bit 1 (Alternate) - 2nd period 'mirror-image' of 1st, etc.;
                         Hold + Alternate = fast reverse of last
                         volume and hold
     bit 2 (Attack)    - as described earlier
     bit 3 (Continue)  - repeat first period indefinitely

 Here  are the different envelope-shapes that can be  created  by
combining the four bit-switches in register R13 of the soundchip:

     |--|--|--|--|--|    envelope-periods

     *
     **
     * *
     *  * * * * * *      &X00.. (bit 0 and 1 are ignored)

        *
       **
      * *
     *  * * * * * *      &X01.. (bit 0 and 1 are ignored)

     *  *  *  *  *
     ** ** ** ** **
     * ** ** ** ** *
     *  *  *  *  *  *    &X1000

     *     *     *
     **   * *   * *
     * * *   * *   *
     *  *     *     *    &X1010

     *  * * * * * *
     ** *
     * **
     *  *                &X1011

        *   *   *   *
       **  **  **  **
      * * * * * * * *
     *  *   *   *   *    &X1100

        * * * * * *
       *
      *
     *                   &X1101

        *     *     *
       * *   * *   *
      *   * *   * *
     *     *     *       &X1110

 I count 8 different envelopes,  not 10.  But I never was good in
counting.  The envelopes &X0000 and &X0100 can be used for  short
shot-like  sounds  (if the envelope-period is  short).  With  the
other six envelopes you can produce continuous sound.

 The  soundchip  has  16 byte-registers  (R0  -  R15),  with  the
following functions (range of values is also shown):

 R0 - period of channel A (= channel 1 for SOUND) : 0-255 (fine)

 R1 - period of channel A                         : 0-16 (coarse)

 R2 - period of channel B (= channel 2)           : 0-255 (fine)

 R3 - period of channel B                         : 0-16 (coarse)

 R4 - period of channel C (= channel 3)           : 0-255 (fine)

 R5 - period of channel C                         : 0-16 (coarse)

 R6 - noise-period                                : 0 - 31

 R7 - mixer of 8 switches (0 = on, 1 is off!):
      bit 0 - channel A
      bit 1 - channel B
      bit 2 - channel C
      bit 3 - noise on channel A
      bit 4 - noise on channel B
      bit 5 - noise on channel C
      bit 6 - I/O register R14 (0=input, 1=output; port A)
      bit 7 - I/O register R15 (port B, i.e. the Centronics port)

 R8 - volume channel A (bit 4: use envelope)   : 0 - 15

 R9 - volume channel B (bit 4: use envelope)   : 0 - 15

 R10- volume channel C (bit 4: use envelope)   : 0 - 15

 R11- envelope-period                          : 0 - 255 (fine)

 R12- envelope-period                          : 0 - 255 (coarse)

 R13- envelope-shape (bit 0 - 3)               : see earlier

 R14- I/O (don't touch this register!)

 R15- I/O (don't touch this register!)

 Combining  R0  and  R1 you get a 12-bit  value  for  the  period
(256*R1+R0,  value  1 - 4095) and the same applies to  R2/R3  and
R4/R5. Converting a period to a frequency and vice versa is easy:

     period = 125000/frequency   and   frequency = 125000/period

 According  to my calculator the soundchip has a  frequency-range
of 31 - 125,000 Hz.  Frequencies above 18,000 Hz (period < 7) are
not very useful,  because most people can't hear such high notes.
One sound-period (or perhaps better: one sound-tick) equals 8.10-
6 second or 8 µs.

 The  two equations on the previous page are also valid  for  the
noise-period (R6). The noise-period is used for all channels that
are noise-enabled by the mixer (R7).  The frequency of the  noise
ranges from 4032 to 125,000 Hz.

 The mixer (R7) uses the bits 'the other way around':  a set  bit
means  off and a cleared bit means on.  Bit 6 and 7 normally  are
set (=output).

 In  R8/R9/R10  you  set bit 4 if you want  to  use  an  envelope
(determined  by R13) and in that case the volume (bit 0 -  3)  is
ignored completely.  Volume 0 will turn the sound on that channel
off.

 Combining  R11 and R12 you get a 16-bit value for the  envelope-
period (256*R12+R11,  value 0 - 65535).  For the  envelope-period
you need other equations:

         period = 7812.5/frequency    and    frequency =

 If my calculator is correct,  the envelope-frequency ranges from
0.12  to 7812.5 Hz.  One envelope-period (or  better:  one  tick)
equals 128 µs. At the maximum period of 65535 the envelope &X1000
will  reach  the volume-peak every 8.4  seconds  (0.12  Hz).  The
envelope-period  has  nothing to do with  the  sound-period.  The
former  determines the frequency of the volume-changes  (see  the
envelope-shapes  mentioned  above).  The  latter  determines  the
frequency (pitch) of a sound.

 The  chosen  envelope-shape  (R13) will be  used  by  all  three
channels.

 Keep your hands off R14 and R15.  The soundchip is used for some
I/O-work and you should not interfere with that.  That's probably
the  reason that with some sound-software the drive-light  is  on
although drive A is not used.

 There  are  a few Public Domain  soundchip-editors  around  that
should  make it easy to construct  interesting  sounds.  Although
it's  nicer to write your own editor.  With all  the  information
about  the soundchip in this paragraph you should be able  to  do
that.  But you'll have to read the paragraph 'Dosound (XBIOS 32)'
as  well,  because  there  you will find out how  to  change  the
registers and, not unimportantly, how to play the sound.

SOUND and WAVE

 A  short  explanation  about the  connection  between  the  (two
versions  of the) SOUND-command and the soundchip-registers  from
the previous paragraph:

     SOUND channel,volume,note,octave,time
     SOUND channel,volume,#period,time

 Note and octave are converted to period, so the two versions are
equivalent. The variables have the following meaning:

     channel (1,2,3) = channel A,B or C in bit 0-2 of R7
     volume (0-15)   = volume in R8, R9 or R10
     note/octave     = (converted to) sound-period
     period (1-4095) = sound-period in R0/R1, R2/R3 or R4/R5
     time ('PAUSE')  = used by XBIOS 32: CHR$(130)+CHR$(time)

The WAVE-command is more complicated:

     WAVE mixer,envelope,shape,period,time

     mixer (switches + 256*noise-period) = R7 + 256*R6
     envelope (use envelope: &Xcba)      = bit 4 of R8, R9 & R10
     shape (envelope-shape)              = R13
     period (envelope-period)            = R11/R12
     time                                = see SOUND

 The  time-parameter  in the SOUND- and  WAVE-command  determines
when the next Basic-command will be executed,  just like a PAUSE-
command does.  If you hear a continuous sound (e.g. with envelope
&X1000)  you have to use another SOUND- or WAVE-command  to  stop
the sound.

 The easiest way to stop all sound is:

     WAVE 0,0       ! turn all sound off

 There are several ways to represent notes and that might confuse
you  a bit.  Assuming you have a rudimentary knowledge of  music,
the twelve notes in one octave can be represented by letters:

     C   C#  D   D#  E   F   F#  G   G#  A   A#  B
     1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10  11  12 (SOUND-notes)

 For  SOUND you use the corresponding numbers 1 - 12.  Often  the
octave-number is inserted behind the note-letter:

     C1  C1# D1  D1# E1  F1  F1# G1  G1# A1  A1# B1
     1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10  11  12
                       (SOUND-octave = 1)

 This is the first octave on my synthesizer. C3 is often referred
to as the 'middle C' and that note has a frequency of 262 Hz.  If
you take C4,  you are one octave higher,  and this means that the
frequency   has  doubled  (524 Hz).   The  highest  note  on   my
synthesizer  is C6.  With SOUND you can play even  higher  notes,
e.g. C9 (note 1, octave 9; at 16,744 Hz it almost hurts my ears).
If  SOUND-note and -octave are known,  the frequency  and  SOUND-
period of the note can be calculated:

     frequency%=55*2^(octave+(note-10)/12)
     period%=125000/frequency%

 To make things a little more complicated,  my synthesizer  knows
nothing about notes, octaves or periods. It only recognizes MIDI-
notes,  which  are bytes with a value of 0 to 127 (bit 7  is  not
used).  E.g.  C3 is MIDI-note 60. Wouldn't it be nice to know how
to  convert MIDI-notes to SOUND-note and -octave?  I  think  this
should work:

     octave=INT(MIDI.note|/12)-2
     note=MOD(MIDI.note|,12)+1

 Using the other two equations you can now convert MIDI-notes  to
frequency  (in Hz) and SOUND-period as well.  Here is our  octave
again, so you can check the results:

     C1  C1# D1  D1# E1  F1  F1# G1  G1# A1  A1# B1    first octave
     1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10  11  12    SOUND-notes
     36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47    MIDI-notes

 In chapter 12 you can read a little bit more about MIDI.

 You don't have a synthesizer, but would like to play some simple
MIDI-music?  Or  you would like to convert an XBIOS 32 song to  a
MIDI-song  for  your  synthesizer?   Then  you  should  know  the
following  MIDI-commands (consisting of two or three  consecutive
bytes):

     first     second    third          MIDI-
     byte      byte      byte           command

     &H8n      note      velocity       note off (channel n)

     &H9n      note      velocity       note off (channel n)

     &HBn      &H7B      &H0            all notes off (channel n)

     &HCn      number    -              program change (chan.l n)

 Other MIDI-commands should probably be ignored completely if you
don't have a synthesizer.  The low nibble of the first byte  (bit
0-3) determines the channel.  E.g.  &H80 means channel 0 and &H8F
means channel 15.  Most MIDI-programs present channel  1 - 16  to
the user,  but internally channel 0 - 15 (&H0 - &HF) is used. The
high nibble of the first byte determines the command.  A note can
have a value of 0 - 127 (bit 7 is always 0), as mentioned before.
Of course you'll have to convert a MIDI-note to the proper SOUND-
note/octave.  The velocity also has a value of 0 - 127. For SOUND
that has to be converted to a volume-range of 0 - 15 (the  SOUND-
range is not linear,  to make it more complicated).  If a note is
on, you have to send a 'note off' command later, although you can
also use the 'note on' command with velocity 0.  A program change
can  be used to switch to another instrument.  You'll  need  some
sort  of  timer to measure the time  between  the  MIDI-commands.
That's all. Good luck.

Dosound (XBIOS 32)

 XBIOS  32  (Dosound)  can be used to play  music  in  a  special
format.  'X32'  is  now  generally recognized  as  the  standard-
extension  for song-files in this format.  The  operating  system
takes care of playing the music during Timer C interrupts  (every
1/50th second):

     ' Piece of music of 2140 bytes in INLINE-line
     INLINE music%,2140
     ~XBIOS(32,L:music%)           ! play the music

 You  can  even play a song continuously with the aid  of  EVERY.
Temporarily  stopping a song is also possible,  because  you  can
determine where you are:

     pointer%=XBIOS(32,L:-1)       ! song-position (0 = end!)
     WAVE 0,0                      ! silence

 You'll  have  to  save the  soundchip-registers  with  XBIOS  28
(Giacces) or you won't be able to continue the song later:

     DIM register(15)
     ' Save registers
     FOR i=0 TO 15
       register(i)=XBIOS(28,0,i)
     NEXT i
     (...)
     ' Restore registers
     FOR i=0 TO 15
       ~XBIOS(28,register(i),i OR 128)
     NEXT i
     ~XBIOS(32,L:pointer%)         ! continue where we left

 If you use XBIOS 32 to play music, you are advised to switch the
key-click off.  Otherwise the music will stop as soon as the user
presses a key.  If you return to the GFA-editor, the key-click is
sometimes  garbled.  Enter  some  illegal command  and  GFA  will
restore  the  proper key-click and inform you about  your  stupid
error.

 XBIOS 32 can also be used for sound-effects.  I have developed a
standard
method for building sound-strings from a few DATA-lines. In the following
example the sound-string s$ is created:

     ' commands in DATA-lines :
     '  REG   = 14 parameters for soundchip-registers R0-R13
     '  END   = end of sound-string
     '  PAUSE = pause (followed by time in 1/50 seconds)
     '  VAR   = decrease/increase tone: channel,start,+/-step,end
     '           start and end: 0-255
     bounce3.sound:
     DATA REG,0,0,0,0,0,0,27,248,16,16,16,35,95,0
     DATA VAR,3,255,-1,116
     DATA PAUSE,255,END
     RESTORE bounce3.sound
     '
     s$=""
     DO
       READ snd$
       snd$=UPPER$(snd$)
       EXIT IF snd$="END"
       IF snd$="REG"
         FOR n=0 TO 13
           READ snd
           s$=s$+CHR$(n)+CHR$(snd)
         NEXT n
       ENDIF
       IF snd$="PAUSE"
         READ snd
         s$=s$+CHR$(130)+CHR$(snd)
       ENDIF
       IF snd$="VAR"
         READ channel,begin,step,end
         s$=s$+CHR$(128)+CHR$(begin)+CHR$(129)+CHR$(channel)+
                                                       CHR$(step)
         s$=s$+CHR$(end)
       ENDIF
     LOOP
     s$=s$+CHR$(255)+CHR$(0)               ! add terminator
     '
     ~XBIOS(32,L:V:s$)                     ! let's hear the sound

 In  the paragraph 'Soundchip' you already read everything  there
is to know about the registers. The VAR-command makes it possible
to create sounds with decreasing/increasing pitch. You don't have
to use the sound-strings as such, you can save a string as a file
or you can store the data in an INLINE-line.

Samples

 From GFA-Basic you can surprise the user with a sampled sound if
you  have  a routine that plays  the  sample.  BASCODE.EXE  (from
Replay)  is  widespread.  You'll have to  find  suitable  samples
first. Look out for sound-effects and speech-samples. Personally,
I  just love the famous Perfect-sample.  There are also  complete
sampled music-pieces around, but such files are always multi-K.

Speech

 Your ST can talk to you with a little help  (STSPEECH.TOS),  but
my   current  GFA-version  (3.07)  refuses  to   cooperate   with
STSPEECH.TOS. Who can help?

Soundmachine

 In the Soundmachine editor you create a so-called object-file of
a  song.  This file contains both the song and a routine to  play
the song. The good quality of the music-sound is achieved because
the notes are sampled sounds. Soundmachine uses three independent
channels in a song.  You can also incorporate sound-effects in  a
song.  If you're looking for the highest sound-quality you run  a
song  in  X100-mode from a GFA-Basic program.  In this  mode  the
processor in your ST is totally dedicated to playing the song, so
your  GFA-program  comes to a complete  standstill.  For  a  good
compromise between sound-quality and speed you run a song in X66-
mode.  Now your program keeps running,  although much slower, and
the  sound-quality  still  is good.  You can also  use  the  Mini
Soundmachine  editor to make beautiful  music  together.  Because
Mini Soundmachine makes optimal use of the soundchip,  your  GFA-
program  runs almost as fast as normal but the  sound-quality  is
much  less  than with Soundmachine.  You can improve  the  sound-
quality by using a sample on one channel, but that will slow your
program  down.  Try it and decide yourself which  song-type  fits
your program best.

 I  saved  the best news for now:  Soundmachine is  available  as
Shareware. As this is the only music-program that I can recommend
for GFA-Basic, my advice is: find it, use it and pay your share.

 If   you  already  have  Soundmachine,   please   follow   these
guidelines:

     Always  enclose  the original Soundmachine song  (*.SNG)  or
     Mini  Soundmachine  song  (*.MSG) if you  spread  your  GFA-
     program  with  music.  Other  owners  of  Soundmachine  will
     appreciate it!

     An  Object-file  (*.OBJ) is suitable  for  your  GFA-program
     only.  Give  information  about the song  in  your  program,
     especially about the use of Flags.

     Use  the  extension  MSM  for  an  object-file  of  a   Mini
     Soundmachine  song that can be used with  any  program.  The
     object-file should contain one song in an endless loop.

     Use  the extension X10 for an Object-file of a  (compressed)
     Soundmachine song that plays in X100-mode only.

     Use  the extension XSM for an Object-file of a  (compressed)
     Soundmachine song that can be played either in X66- or X100-
     mode. Such a song should contain:
          X66 L-P-[all 3 channels] :0 F0,0 :1 XX R1,0,0 R2,0,100
          R3,0,66 J0 :2 X100 :3  [actual song]  J3
     In  your GFA-program you should set Flag 0 to 100 for  X100-
     mode,  or  to 66 for X66-mode.  Use Flag 0 for this  purpose
     only.

GIST

 GIST (GI Sound Tool by Lee Actor,  (c) Synthetic Software) is  a
program that allows you to create 'true' ADSR-envelopes.  In GFA-
Basic you can use a GIST-sound quite easily.  Sounds can be  used
as sound-effects,  but you can also play notes. Sound-effects can
be  pretty impressive compared to XBIOS 32 sounds.  GIST  has  no
music-editor  (I hope you write one for me),  so you have  to  do
some  extra  work.  If  you have a piece of  music  in  MIDI-note
notation it's easy,  because the GIST-driver uses MIDI-notes (24-
108, see paragraph 'SOUND and WAVE').

TCB Tracker

 With  the  TCB Tracker editor (by  Anders  Nilsson,  not  Public
Domain) you can create music on four tracks (= channels).  As  in
Soundmachine  the  notes are sampled sounds,  so the  quality  is
pretty good. You can play TCB Tracker songs (*.MOD) in GFA-Basic,
but only if you use a colour monitor with a vertical frequency of
50 Hz.  At 60 Hz the music may still sound acceptable,  but at 72
Hz  (High resolution) it's played too fast.  Your GFA-program  is
halted  completely  and  you can only stop  a  song  by  pressing
<Space>.  Unless  the replay routine is improved  drastically,  I
can't really recommend TCB Tracker for GFA-Basic programs.

Staccato

 I was not impressed by the program Staccato (by Leo de Wit), but
I  really  liked the music (*.MUS) that can be played  with  that
program.  A  lot of effort was put into the large  collection  of
music-files.  What a waste.  Unless somebody has a replay routine
for Staccato.  Or,  better still, a program to convert the *.MUS-
files (ASCII-format) to XBIOS 32 format.

Music Studio

 Only one question about Music Studio: does anybody have a replay
routine  for  playing Music Studio song-files (*.SNG) in  a  GFA-
Basic program? Please?

                     Procedures (CHAPTER.16)

Bell                                                         BELL
 The wellknown bell-sound:
     @bell(5)            ! ring the bell 5 times
 No Nobel prize for this Procedure.

Cont_song_play and Cont_song                   \CONTSONG\CONTPLAY
 Play a song in XBIOS 32 format (*.X32) continuously with EVERY:
     INLINE music%,1458
     @cont_song_play(music%)
 The key-click is switched off by this Procedure.  The music will
play   continuously,   until  you  either  call   the   Procedure
Cont_song_break or Cont_song_stop.

Cont_song_stop                                 \CONTSONG\CONTSTOP
 Stop the song that was started with Procedure Cont_song_play:
     INLINE music%,1458
     @cont_song_play(music%)
     (...)
     @cont_song_stop
 The key-click is switched on again.

Cont_song_break and Cont_song_continue         \CONTSONG\CONT_BRK
 Interrupt a continuously playing song:
     INLINE music%,1458
     @cont_song_play(music%)
     (...)
     @cont_song_break              ! key-click switched on
     (...)
     @cont_song_continue           ! continue where we left it
     (...)
     @cont_song_stop

Dosound_init and Dosound_string                          DOSND_IN
 Create sound-strings for Procedure Dosound:
     @dosound_init
 The sounds are created as global string-variables.

Dosound                                                   DOSOUND
 Play  an  XBIOS  32  song  or  a  sound-string  from   Procedure
Dosound_init
     INLINE music%,1458
     @dosound(music%)
     (...)
     WAVE 0,0                      ! silence
     @dosound(V:soundeffect$)

Gist_init/exit/on/off/stop/prior/stop_all                 \GIST\*
Play GIST-sound (sound-effect or piece of music):
     INLINE gist.driver%,3000
     INLINE gist.effect%,112
     INLINE gist.note%,112
     @gist_init
     (...)
     ' sound-fx on channel 1, default volume/note, priority 10
     @gist_on(gist.effect%,1,-1,-1,10)
     ' you don't need Gist_off for a sound-effect
     (...)
     ' note on channel 2, volume 10, MIDI-note 48, priority 1
     @gist_on(gist.note%,2,10,48,1)
     PAUSE 3*50
     @gist_off(2)                  ! note off after 3 seconds
     (...)
     @gist_exit                    ! absolutely essential

Msm_init/start/stop/effect/flag/exit                   \MINI_SM\*
 Load Mini Soundmachine object-file and play the music:
     @msm_init("A:\SONG.MSM",ok!)  ! load the music
     IF ok!
       @msm_start                  ! play the music
     ELSE
       ' something went wrong
     ENDIF
     (...)
     @msm_stop                     ! stop the music
     (...)
     @msm_exit                     ! absolutely essential

Sample                                                     SAMPLE
 Play a suitable sample:
     INLINE sample.bascode%,2794
     INLINE sample.adr%,20000
     @sample(sample.adr%,20000,5)  ! speed=5
     PAUSE 10

Sm_init/flag/start_x100/wait/start_x66/stop_x66/space/exit
 Load Soundmachine object-file and play the music:    \SND_MACH\*
     @sm_init("A:\SONG.XSM",70000,ok!)  ! load the music (70000=
                                                          buffer)
     IF ok!
       @sm_flag(0,66)                   ! X66-mode
       @sm_start_x66                    ! play the music
     ELSE
       ' something went wrong
     ENDIF
     (...)
     @sm_stop_x66                       ! stop the music
     (...)
     @sm_exit                           ! absolutely essential

Song_play and Song_stop               \SONG\  SONGPLAY & SONGSTOP
 Play XBIOS 32 song (*.X32) once:
     INLINE music%,2057
     @song_play(music%)       ! song keeps playing until finished
     (...)
     @song_stop               ! stop song prematurely

Song_restart                                       \SONG\SONGREST
 Restart song that was stopped with @song_stop:
     @song_stop
     (...)
     @song_restart

Song_break and Song_continue                       \SONG\SONG_BRK
 Interrupt a song that was started with @song_play:
     INLINE music%,2057
     @song_play(music%)
     (...)
     @song_break              ! key-click switched on
     (...)
     @song_continue           ! continue where we left the song
 The  music now keeps playing until the end,  or until  Procedure
Song_stop is called.

 The  following  Procedures use SOUND and/or WAVE  to  produce  a
sound:                                                    \SOUND\
Sound_alarm                                                 ALARM
Sound_boing_1
                                             BOING_1
Sound_boing_2                                             BOING_2
Sound_cling                                                 CLING
Sound_heart                                                 HEART
Sound_pompom                                               POMPOM
Sound_poof                                                   POOF
Sound_siren_1                                             SIREN_1
Sound_tideli
                                               TIDELI
Sound_ting                                                   TING
Sound_tong                                                   TONG

Tcb_tracker                                              TCBTRACK
 Play a TCB Tracker song (*.MOD):
     @tcb_tracker("A:\SONG.MOD",TRUE)
 The replay-routine TRACKER.ROT (for ST's,  not STE's) must be in
the default-path. You have to press <Space> to stop the music.

                     Functions (CHAPTER.16)

Frequency                                                    FREQ
 Returns frequency (Hz) of note/octave:
     PRINT @frequency(1,3)              ! C3

Frequency_MIDI                                           FREQMIDI
 Returns the frequency (Hz) of a MIDI-note:
     PRINT @frequency_MIDI(60)          ! that's C3 also

MIDI_byte                                                MIDIBYTE
 Returns the MIDI-note that corresponds with note/octave:
     PRINT @MIDI_byte(1,3)

Octave                                                     OCTAVE
 Returns the SOUND-octave of a MIDI-note:
     PRINT @octave(60)

Note                                                         NOTE
 Returns the SOUND-note of a MIDI-note:
     PRINT @note(60)

Period                                                     PERIOD
 Returns the SOUND-period of note/octave:
     PRINT @period(1,3)

Period_MIDI                                              PERDMIDI
 Returns the SOUND-period of a MIDI-note:
     PRINT @period_MIDI(60) 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.