Skip to main content
© Dirk 'Nod of Level 16' Pelz

 "Nostalgia isn't what it used to be."

 A FOURTH ATTEMPT AT THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE DISK MAGAZINE ROUNDUP!
                   PART 2: EROTICA - RTS TRACK
                      by Richard Karsmakers

Erotica

 A new defunct American porn magazine with a mediocre ST  medium-
res shell, offering nudy pics, sex-phone stories and vibrator-and
sex book-reviews.
 Status: Pubic Domain.
 User interface: Yes, GEM oriented thingy.
 Latest known issue: 2.
 Address: Irrelevant.
 Health: Died during The Act.
 Language: English.

Eye on Scene

 When  "Massive  Mag" (Cf.) folded,  some of the members  of  the
Admirables  went on to do "Eye on Scene".  It's a magazine  aimed
primarily at the ST/E,  though there is also Falcon coverage.  It
works on all systems, anyway.
 It's supposed to have a really good shell,  it's "different from
the  regular  diskmag scene" and it's done  by  Tommi  Koistinen,
a.k.a.  Nirvana of the Admirables.  The first issue was  released
around the end of 1994.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: A custom one, supposed to be good.
 Latest known issue: Issue 2 (spring or summer 1995).
 Address: Kotimaenkuja 2, 27230 Lappi TL, Finland.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Fair Play

 A disk magazine that I only read something about. No details are
known,  but the user interface is said to be crap,  the  articles
few (something like 10) and its directory scattered (source: "RTS
Track").

Falcon Magazine

 A  weekly  but unfortunately rather  short-lived  disk  magazine
especially for the Falcon.  The first issue came out on June 28th
1993. Its editor was Jos van Roosmalen. The first two issues were
text files on disk,  less than 50 Kb in size, and the rest of the
disk was filled with various source material and programs.  It is
a shame that this magazine ceased to exist so quickly, because it
was a most excellent way to get the best from your  Falcon,  even
though  it  was  written in Dutch.  Issue 3 (mid  July)  saw  the
introduction of a GEM interface,  but it was very sloppy  (though
"MultiTOS" compatible!).
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: No.
 Latest known issue: Issue 3.
 Address: Not important.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: Dutch.

Falcon Update Digital

 A  Falcon magazine that,  as of issue 6,  has a Falcon  specific
shell  that  incorporates  such nifty things as  256  colour  FLI
animation,  picture  display (GIF,  TARGA,  IFF  and  RAW),  DSP-
replayed modules,  multiple text windows open,  and compatibility
with "NVDI",  "MultiTOS",  VGA, RGB and any TOS 4.xx. It's not as
perfect  as  it  sounds,   but  a  good  and  sizeable   magazine
nonetheless. Needs 1 Mb to run, but also needs a hard drive!
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes, an insanely hyper one.
 Latest known issue: Issue 8 (early 1995).
 Address: Not known.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

F.A.S.T.E.R.

 The magazine that started everything with regard to a neat  user
interface  - one of the very earliest ST disk  magazines,  having
started  somewhere  in the autumn of 1986.  It  was  Canadian  of
origin, and I seem to recall that some of the earliest issues had
a  set  of English articles and their  copies  in  French.  Later
issues  were English only.  They were the first that had  a  user
interface,  and  they  survived  only a bit more than  a  year  -
probably because they were commercial, which tends to make things
more complicated than they need be .  Last known issue was Volume
2 Issue 4, and I'm pretty sure that's the final one too.
 The "F.A.S.T.E.R." user group still lives on, so it seems.
 Status: Commercial.
 User interface: Yes. A custom one (the first one).
 Latest known issue: Volume 2 Issue 4.
 Address: No longer relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language:  Used to be French and English. Later issues were only
  in English.

Fiction Online

 This  magazine  was launched in spring 1994 and  features  short
stories,  chapters of novels,  acts of plays and  poems.  Initial
contributors  are associated with the Northwest  Fiction  Writers
Group  of Washington,  DC.  It will also publish works  by  other
authors and welcomes submissions from the public.  The editor  is
William (Bill) Ramsay.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: None.
 Latest  known issue:  Volume 2 Issue 6 (November/December  1995,
  the 9th issue).
 Address: Email ngwazi@clark.net.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

FSFNet

 This  was the forerunner to "DargonZine" (Cf.).  It has  in  the
mean time ceased publication. A total of 11 issues appeared under
editorship of "Orny" Liscomb until 1988. No hands-on experience.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: No.
 Latest known issue: Volume 8 Issue 3.
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: English.

Funhouse

 This is,  hold on, "the cyberzine of degenerate pop culture". It
started in March 1993, and is written and edited by Jeff Dove. It
covers a wide variety of topics, some of which are music reviews,
concert  reports,  and books examined.  A most  excellent  online
magazine,  and don't let the name fool you into thinking  they're
not at least halfway seriously interesting.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: No.
 Latest known issue: Volume 1 Issue 5 (October 20th 1994).
 Address: Email jeffdove@well.sf.ca.us.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

G.D.I.

 A  Spanish true multi-format (ST/Amiga/PC)  magazine,  primarily
written in Spanish,  too,  but with some articles in English.  It
works  on any  ST/TT/Falcon,  actually,  including  multi-tasking
operating systems.  It uses a kind of "hypertext" interface where
you  can  click  on indices  causing  sublists  and,  eventually,
articles  to be loaded.  Actual content cannot quality  can't  be
judged  due to limited understanding of Spanish in  yours  truly.
The first issue was released on March 12th 1994.
 G.D.I. stands for Grupo de Desarrollo Informatico, by the bye.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: Yes, a custom one.
 Latest known issue: Issue 2.
 Address: Email gdi@dtc.uvigo.es or gdi@ait.uvigo.es.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: Spanish, with some wee bits of English.

GEnieLamp Atari ST

 This is the resource magazine covering the Genie (BBS system) ST
RoundTable.  It  offers all information that could  otherwise  be
found  on  Genie,  comprising an enormous  amount  of  up-to-date
information. It is released monthly (on the 1st of each month) in
ASCII  format,  but  a special version is available for  the  TX2
reader  software  (featuring  graphics).   The  first  issue  was
published  in  June 1990.  There have been a few  months  in  its
existence in which two issues have been released. It is published
by  T/TalkNET,  and  the  editor  is  Sheldon  (previously  Bruce
Faulkner). There are "GEnieLamp" magazines covering Amiga, PC and
MacIntosh as well.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: No.
 Latest known issue: Issue 84 (September 1995).
 Address: Email gelamp.st@genie.geis.com.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

GRIST On-Line

 This is a journal of electronic network poetry, art and culture.
It's  eclectic,  and will be open to all the language and  visual
art forms that develop on the net. It's an ASCII text file edited
by John Fowler.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: None.
 Latest known issue: Not known.
 Address:  Columbus Circle Sta.,  P.O.  Box 20805,  New York,  NY
  10023-1496, USA, email fowler@phantom.com.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Guildsman, The

 This  is yet another modem magazine spread as  text  file,  this
time being the Journal of Gamers' Guild of UCR.  It is devoted to
role-playing games and amateur fantasy/SF fiction.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: None.
 Latest known issue: Not known.
 Address: Not known.
 Health: Probably alive.
 Language: English.

Holy Temple of Mass Consumption

 A   trendy  pseudo-whatever  online  magazine  featuring   comic
reviews, zine list, humour and a load of more stuff. I guess it's
stuff you have to read if you're in any way telling other  people
you're on the net or being "into things" in general.  What a crap
description, but what a heck.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: None.
 Latest known issue: Issue #30, July 1995.
 Address:  P.O.  Box 30904,  Raleigh,  NC 27622-0904,  USA; email
  slack@ncsu.edu.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

HotFlash

 "Wired"  is a regular paper cyber/network/whatever  magazine  in
the United States that's incredibly cult and trendy and loads  of
other  good  adjectives (including  "yuppie",  according  to  its
adversaries).  To  stay in touch with what it is doing and get  a
weekly  news mailing,  "HotFlash" is the thing to  subscribe  to.
Subscribe by sending a message containing "subscribe hotwire"  to
the   email  address  mentioned  below.   Despite   the   general
uninteresting   contents,   it   usually   has   around   100,000
subscribers  (right now an almost constant  94,000  though).  For
help,  send "help" instead of the message mentioned earlier.  End
your message with "end".
 With this mail server it is easy to get the full back issues  of
the  real  "Wired" magazine too - all you have to do is  get  all
individial  articles  and  glue them  together.  And  the  actual
"Wired"    is   to   computer/cyberspace   hobbyists   and    all
intelligent  beings  what  "Atari Explorer Online"  is  to  Atari
phreaks.
 Until Volume 1 Issue 22, "HotFlash" was called "HotWired" (Cf.).
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: None.
 Latest  known  issue:  Volume 2 Issue 47 (November  24th  1995).
  Volume 1 went up to Volume 1 Issue 39.
 Address: Email Info-rama@wired.com.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

HotWired

 Until Volume 1 Issue 22, this used to be the name of what is now
"HotFlash" (Cf.).  Now it's the interactive "Wired" on-line World
Wide Web location name or something.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: None.
 Latest known issue: Volume 1 Issue 22 (September 23rd 1994).
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Became another medium; dead but reincarnated.
 Language: English.

How to Code

 A virtually Falcon-specific coding magazine,  really hot on  the
heels of the latest programming tricks with regard to  DSP,  MPEG
playing, GIF display and all that stuff. Of limited appeal to the
layman, of course, but all the more interesting for Those Who Are
In  The Know.  The articles come in French and  English.  It  has
official distributors around the globe (it is  shareware),  which
will not be listed here,  though.  It is done by members of  EKO,
really famous French Falcon demo programmers.
 Status:  Shareware (costs 50 French Francs,  and to give you  an
  idea of what that is, the UK distributor asks £7.50).
 User interface:  A neat custom one.  There's one for the  Falcon
  and one GEM-friendly one that'll work as ACC or PRG.
 Latest known issue: Issue 3 (summer 1995 or thereabouts).
 Address: Alexis Naibo, 63 Rue des Cigognes, F-31520, Ramonville,
  France.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: French and English.

HP Source

 A disk magazine that (also) payed attention to STOS programming,
the  successor to "STOS Bits" (Cf.).  It also payed attention  to
"GfA Basic" and assembler,  and had a much neater user  interface
than its predecessor.  The editor, Leon O'Reilly, decided to call
it quits after issue 2 as he considered it wasn't perfect enough.
Rumours have it that it was intended as sortof an undead "Maggie"
(Cf.) but "Maggie" suddenly went undead all on its own so there.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes, a custom one.
 Latest known issue:  Issue 2 (released at Ripped Off  Convention
  1992).
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: English.

ICTARI

 According  to  an  ad  I  read  somewhere:  "Are  you  an  Atari
programmer? It does not matter which language you use, whether it
be STOS,  assembler,  C,  or whatever takes your fancy,  you  nee
ICTARI,  the  Atari  ST  Programmer's  Disk  Magazine."  Features
sources  and  ideas for novices and experts alike.  An  issue  is
released  on every 15th of the month,  which I think is  quite  a
feat.  I've got no hands-on experience,  but it's supposed to  be
quite good. The disk magazine is a publication of the "The ICTARI
programmer's user group", which started in March 1993. Except for
a  small gap in 1993 - when the editor was changed - the mag  has
been released regularly.  The group's membership is free; all you
pay is the postage for the issues that get sent to you,  and send
them the disks for it.
 Status: Public Domain, sortof.
 User interface: No. Just use the desktop or a text displayer.
 Latest known issue: Issue 26 (September 15th 1995).
 Address:  ICTARI,  The ATARI Programmer's User Group,  c/o Peter
  Hibbs, 63 Woolsbridge Road,    Ringwood,    Hants.,   BH24 2LX,
  England.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Inc Magazine

 A  disk mag offered by the Incoders,  a demo crew  from  Sweden.
Made by a bunch of real enthusiasts,  but once said (I quote)  to
have  "the effect of a bunch of schoolkids leaping up  and  down"
(source:  "STEN" disk magazine roundup).  Articles were short and
its appeal was limited. One of its writers, one Mr. Cool, went on
to "DBA Magazine" after "Inc Magazine" folded.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes, a custom one.
 Latest known issue: Not known.
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: English.

Indy Magazine

 In  mid  1994,  the latest hot thing,  presumably  with  monthly
intent. Little is known about it, however, at current, other than
that it is released by a union of German crews calling themselves
Independent  (some  70  people  in  total,  with  some  excellent
graphics persons).
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Probably yes.
 Latest known issue: Rumoured issue 4.
 Address: Unknown.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: Most likely to be German.

Inside Info

 A  bi-monthly  disk magazine published by the  New  South  Wales
section of "ACE" (Atari Computer Enthusiasts).  It's basically  a
magazine  for members,  so it includes meeting minutes and  stuff
like that. Looks OK, especially if you want to stay in touch with
down under.  Has a good shell, but you have to wade through a bit
too much before you can get down to the actual reading.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes, the "Infodisk" shell.
 Latest known issue: Issue 76 (summer 1995).
 Address:   20  Blairgourie  Circuit,   St.  Andrews,  NSW  2556,
  Australia.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

InSoft Disk Newsletter

 A US disk magazine.  Nothing is known about the amount of issues
that  have  appeared,  and not even if the only  issue  of  which
notice was made (an August 1986 one) was indeed the first one.
 Status: Probably Public Domain.
 User interface: Probably. Not certainly.
 Latest known issue: Not known.
 Address: Irrelevant.
 Health: Dead and decomposing.
 Language: English.

Interaction

 This magazine is best described by quoting a bit from it:  "As a
first issue,  this is an experimental and reduced version of what
Intercation aims to be.  Computers are everywhere, and so is art,
but   few  are  the  time  we  see  them  in  combination."   And
"Interaction"  tries  to be a collaboration between  the  two.  I
haven't seen it myself yet. It's also available for Amiga and PC,
and  used  to be a paper magazine before it entered  the  digital
realm.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface:  Yes,  a fairly simple but effective plain  text
  displayer shell.
 Latest issue: Issue 1.
 Address: Not known.
 Health: Getting there, alive.
 Language: English.

Interleave

 A rather excellent disk magazine with literary tendencies  that,
unfortunately,  folded  after  two cult issues that  appeared  in
1991.  Its  editor  was  Tom Zunder,  who  filled  the  mag  with
"software,  music,  films and sex". What more would one want? Tom
continued  writing  for "STEN" (Cf.) and "ST NEWS"  (Cf.)  for  a
while, but was never heard of afterwards.
 Status: Licenceware.
 User interface: The S.A.N.D. shell.
 Latest known issue: Number 2.
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: English.

InterText - An Electronic Fiction Digest

 Like its predecessor,  "Athena" (Cf.),  this magazine is devoted
to  publishing  fiction - lots of it.  It's  a  network  magazine
edited by Jason Snell, and has so far come out bi-monthly (except
for  four  month gaps between V1N1 (March 1991)  and  V1N2  (July
1991).  The  first issue was released around March 1991.  It's  a
rather excellent magazine, capably edited and all.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: None.
 Latest known  issue: Volume 5 Issue 6  (November/December  1995,
  the 27th issue).
 Address: 21645 Parrotts Ferry Road, Sonora, CA 95370, USA. Email
  jsnell@intertext.com.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Jag!

 "Jag!" is an on-line Jaguar-dedicated magazine in German.  I  am
not sure when it started exactly,  but probably around the end of
1993 or in January 1994.  Half of it is about Jaguar game reviews
and  all kinds of interesting stuff,  the other half consists  of
advertisements.  It's released every two weeks, and its editor is
Carsten Nipkow.
 Status: Publis Domain, on-line.
 User interface: None.
 Latest known issue: 3/94 (February 1994).
 Address: An der Ruthe 9, D-58791 Werdohl, Germany.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: German.

Lavarush

 Unfortunately not much is known about this disk magazine,  as  I
only  found  half an ad of it (in the now  long  defunct  English
"Zero" glossy magazine),  of which I'll share the text with  you:
"Lavarush,  new  ST diskzine for everyone with computer  reviews,
features, music, films,"...
 And,  indeed,  that's  where  it stopped.  More  info  seriously
needed.

Ledgers Magazine

 This  was the demo group "Untouchables" disk  magazine.  It  was
very  enthusiastic  and full of humour  (and  indeed,  seemed  to
consist primarily of it).  Featured short articles,  but many  of
them.  One of the better and definitely one of the most zany disk
magazines around. Their user interface used to be a GEM pull-down
menu but later became a mega-demo-like playfield with  selectable
bunches  of articles as opposed to demo screens.  The editor  and
chief coder was Matt Sullivan.  Neat intros.  Colour  only.  They
seemed to appear about every month, which was quite a feat!
 Status:  Used  to be licenceware,  but shareware as of issue  9.
  Costs £3.
 User interface: Yes. A fully custom one. It differs per issue.
 Latest known issue: Issue 13 (September 1992).
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health:  Dead.  Sometimes there's a tiny rumour of life, though,
  no matter how ill-placed, for they are truly deceased.
 Language: English.

Leic ST

 This is a magazine that I have no personal experience with,  but
it's said to be extremely crap; basically about 5 Kb of text with
the  rest of the disk filled with PD.  It appears to be  monthly,
though this is not certain, and doesn't really classify as a disk
magazine actually.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes, the "ST Zine" PD one.
 Latest known issue: Issue 26.
 Address: Not known.
 Health: Alive?
 Language: English.

Lowell Review - Online, The

 An annual fiction/poetry/essays paper magazine initiated by Rita
"Core"  (Cf.)  Rouvalis.  It's pretty much in the  same  vein  as
"Core",  only a lot bigger.  The "Online" bit is basically just a
teaser for the real thing that is a lot bigger.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: No.
 Latest known issue: 1994 issue.
 Address:  Instant Karma Press, P.O. Box 632, Vienna, Ohio 44473,
  USA. Email rita@etext.org.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Maggie

 Having started in June 1990, "Maggie" (or "Disk Maggie") quickly
became one of the very best ST disk magazines.  It was  initiated
by the British Lost Boys and at the time almost entirely  written
by  Michael  Schussler (a German guy living in  England).  As  of
issue  8,  when  Michael  joined the  Delta  Force,  they  became
unbelievably much better,  with a totally slick menu, much better
music,  picture and a fast page viewer.  A quality turnpoint came
in 1993 when,  with the release of issue 11,  "Maggie" turned out
to have been taken over by some British guys lead by the  editor,
Chris  "CIH" Holland.  All the good bits previously present  were
now  complemented  with much better writing,  a healthy  dose  of
enthusiasm  and,  lacking completely before that,  wit.  It  also
worked  on the Falcon,  though with the lustrum issue  of  August
1995  (issue  18) they started releasing separate  disks  for  ST
(with  the  old shell and ST goodies) and Falcon  (HD  disk  with
fancy mod, more colours and Falcon goodies). The Falcon shell was
coded by the talented Reservoir Gods.
 "Maggie" tries to be bi-monthly.  Remarkably, it works on colour
as well as monochrome.
 After Issue 16,  a special "Maggie's Guide to Classic  Consoles"
issue  was  released.  Although done with the "Maggie"  ST  shell
(kind  thanks  to  Chris),  it has nothing  further  to  do  with
"Maggie"  at all,  and was done by Reservoir Gods.  Nice for  old
console freaks,  though (as in Colecovision,  Vectrex, Atari 2600
and the like).
 Status:  Licenceware  (up  to and including  issue  10),  Public
  Domain (later issues).
 User interface:  Yes.  Crap up to 7,  after that really nice and
  custom.
 Latest known issue: Number 18 (August 1995, the lustrum issue).
 Address: 84 North Street, Rushden, Northants NN10 9BU, UK.
 Health: Alive.
 Language:  Previously (<issue 11) English with some German,  now
  only English.

Magnum

 A Polish disk magazine made by the group Illusions (or  Warriors
of Darkness; maybe they have several names). The first issue, "0"
promotion  issue,  was  released around  May/June  of  1992.  Its
articles were rather short and few,  displayed in 40-column mode.
Only  colour  monitors  were supported.  It  had  a  custom  user
interface  where  the cursor keys lead you  through  the  various
options  and the space bar selected them.  You had  several  menu
screens.  The  music was in tracker .MOD format,  and  was  quite
excellent. There were several modules in each issue.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface:  A custom one.  Not too excellent,  not too  bad
  either.
 Latest  known issue:  Issue 3 (fourth  issue,  November/December
  1992)
 Address: No longer relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: Polish.

Massive Mag

 A Finnish disk magazine with a demo'n'hacking  atmosphere.  Nice
music (some of it ripped), nice demos, nice graphics. Quite a lot
of stuff was offered,  among which also quite a load of articles.
The editor was Claff Moron of the Admirables.  It died around the
middle of 1994.
 In  earlier versions of this disk magazine roundup it  was  also
called  "Admirabels Mag".  That magazine actually never  existed,
and was "Massive Mag" actually.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes. A custom one. Quite slow.
 Latest  known  issue:  Number  4.  Issue 5 was  made  but  never
  released.
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: English.

MAST Newsdisk

 In  1988,  ex-US  distributor  of "ST NEWS"  (Cf.)  David  Meile
started  his own disk magazine with the MAST user  group  ("MAST"
was  "Massuchusetts Atari ST" user group).  It was  called  "MAST
Newsdisk",  of  which  only  two issues are known  to  have  been
released  (the last one in April 1988).  It used  the  "Newsdisk"
shell  program.  After  this  magazine  sortof  ceased,  suddenly
nothing was heard of David (he got married somewhere,  I believe)
and "ST NEWS" had to look for another US distribution channel.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes. The "Newsdisk" shell.
 Latest known issue: Number 2.
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: English.

NASA Mag

 This  disk  magazine,  of which little is known except  for  the
fact that at least one issue appeared,  and that it is written in
French and English.  It might be dead,  it might be  alive.  More
information required.

News Channel

 A  fellow Dutch disk magazine that arose somewhere in  1987  and
survived  a bit over 1 year.  Somewhat notorious for  its  mainly
polemic battle with ST NEWS - mainly concerning them using  their
authors, their music and their foreign distributor network.
 For  a while,  some of the people behind "News  Channel"  seemed
to be getting back in the picture with "STabloid" (Cf.).
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes. A custom one.
 Latest known issue: Volume 2 Issue 1.
 Address: No longer relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: English.

News Flash

 This is a disk magazine "in utero", as Nirvanians would have it.
The first issue is/was planned for autumn 1995, so we'll just see
what comes of it.  It's made by the crew Flash, from Finland. The
main head editor honcho seems to be Juha Vihriala.
 Status: Public domain.
 User interface: It's bound to have a custom one.
 Latest known issue: None yet.
 Address: Eljaksentie 6, 62800 Vimpeli, Finland.
 Health: In utero, most likely.
 Language: English?
 Remark: "Eljaksentie" means "Road where moose cross".

Nova

 "Nova" is an Atari ST disk magazine,  non-profit,  released  for
the  first  time  around  spring  of  1994.   It's  dedicated  to
"Trekkies",  i.e.  fans of the "Star Trek" films/series and stuff
like that. The latest issue can be obtained by sending a disk and
one pound plus SAE (or IRCs if you live outside England) to James
Bird (whom I assume is the editor) at the below address.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Unknown.
 Latest known issue: Issue 2.
 Address:  91 Elm tree Avenue,  Kilburn, Belper, Derby, DE56 0NN,
  England.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Nutworks

 Available through US networks,  this was a multi-format  on-line
disk  magazine which concentrates on stories,  jokes,  songs  and
everything  you might care to think of.  As they  said,  it's  "a
virtual  magazine  for  people  who  teeter  on  the  precipe  of
insanity".  Not  particularly  computer-related.  It  started  in
January 1985,  and the last reported issue was 1988's Volume  26.
Much  of  its material finds its way into the  humorous  bits  of
other disk magazines today. It was moderated by Joe Desbonnet.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface:  No.
 Latest known issue: Volume (issue) 26.
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: English.

Omphalos

 A science fiction review magazine edited by John  R.R.  Leavitt,
released   on-line  on  quarterly  basis.   Paper  editions   are
available,  though you have to pay for those of course.  The good
thing  about these paper editions is that they have  artwork.  It
covers books primarily,  but also spends attention to games,  TV,
magazines  and  films (all of them reviews).  It's  available  in
ASCII, Postscript and Hypertext formats. Paper issue subscription
are US$ 12 for a year (i.e. four issues).
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: No.
 Latest known issue: The first issue, Spring (May) 1994.
 Address:  5715 Ellsworth Avenue D-2,  Pittsburgh, PA 15232, USA,
  or email jrrl@cs.cmu.edu.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

ON-Disk

 A  British disk magazine by Paul Wilson.  Last known  issue  was
number  3,  that appeared spring 1988.  The program had quite  an
unintuitive and buggy user interface,  but the editorial contents
were OK.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes. A custom one that was not too good.
 Latest known issue: Not certain, but probably number 3.
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: English.

Power Disk Magazine

 Started as a monthly (!) shareware disk magazine run by James L.
Mathews (who is very young, 13 at the start of the magazine early
1993).  It uses a STOS-based shell, I believe, and it is supposed
to  work  on  any TOS 1.xx,  though not on that  of  the  Falcon.
Although  the  editorial staff thinks highly of  itself  and  its
efforts, it's just another good disk magazine really. At start it
has a lot (like, 100) articles that were very small (like, 3.5 Kb
on  average),  but articles are getting less and  longer.  As  of
issue 23,  texts are stored compressed and the user interface has
been  overhauled.  As  of  that  issue,  mono  compatibility  was
provided, though Falcon compatibility still seems a long way off.
Around issue 25 it became bi-monthly.
 It  has changed status a few times and is  currently  shareware.
Registering will award you with a password that will give  access
to competition entry, bonus prizes and discounts at Power PD.
 Status: Public Domain from issues 1 to 7. Power Licenceware from
  issue  8 to 15 (costs £2.50 per issue including disk and  p&p).
  Shareware as of issue 16 of May 1994 (£1 to £1.50  registration
  fee to cover running costs).
 User interface: Yes, an OK but rather slow STOS one.
 Latest known issue: Issue 26 (May 1995).
 Address: 3 Salisbury Road, Maidstone, Kent ME14 2TY, England.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Pure Bollocks

 A  strictly  underground  magazine,  with  rather  controversial
contents.  Articles are peppered with obscenities (and the  demos
with  naughty  piccies),  and  it's  very  coder-oriented.  Among
others,  this  magazine  features "how to" articles  on  cracking
digital locks, hacking answerphones and American Pirate BBS phone
numbers. Lots of it comes from various sources "on the net". It's
Scottish,  and started with Issue 21,  January 17th 1993.  Spring
1995 saw them recoding their shell for future use.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes, a very flashy smooth one. Very original.
 Latest known issue: Issue 23 (September 18th 1993).
 Address: P.O. Box 1083, Glasgow G14 9DG, Scotland, UK. A support
  page on the WWW is http://www.gla.ac.uk/~895822ja/pb/.
 Health: Alive, but being reprogrammed and lacking writers so, in
  their words, "alive but a little sleepy" (which might be a most
  tremendous understatement).
 Language: English.

Quanta

 A multi-format on-line magazine that concentrates solely on  the
publication of fiction.  And quite excellent fiction,  one  might
want  to  add.  It  was  founded in  1989  by  editor  Daniel  K.
Appelquist. Not much to be said about it. It's just actually very
good.  No more.  No less.  It goes out to over 3,000 subscribers,
making it very big.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: No.
 Latest known issue: July 1995.
 Address: 3003 Van Ness St. NW #S919, Washington D.C. 20008, USA,
  or email quanta@netcom.com.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Quantum Underground Anarchic Reading Konspiracy (QUARK)

 An English disk magazine available on ST,  Amiga, PC and Amstrad
CPC formats.  Basically it's made by Pete Binsley and two friends
across  these formats.  Concentrates on fiction only,  but has  a
user interface.  Quite small - their debut issue took up only 150
Kb in space (the program plus about two dozen uncompressed  short
stories and the like).
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes. A rather basic one.
 Latest known issue: One (September 1992).
 Address:  52 Avis Road,  Denton,  Newhaven, East Sussex BN9 0PN,
  England.
 Health: Alive?
 Language: English.

Quast

 A  Polish  disk magazine put together by  the  Quast  group,  in
Poland.  Nothing  much  is known about it,  other  than  that  it
exists.
 Status: Not known.
 User interface: Not known.
 Latest known issue: Not known, but one should guess at least 1.
 Address: Ul. Niecala 3, 89-100 Naklo.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: Not known.
 Remark:  The 'l' in Niecala and Naklo is actually no 'l', but an
  'l' with a capital 'L' written across it with the vertical  bit
  slanted  to the right,  so 'l' and 'L' written on top  of  each
  other. That's Polish for you!

Random Access Humor

 This is an electronic humour magazine,  a rag-tag collection  of
fugitive  humour,  some  of  which  is  vaguely  related  to  the
BBS/Online System world. The editor is Dave Bealer. It started in
September  1992 on a monthly basis,  but as of 1994 is started  a
10-month  schedule  (issues  out  each  month  outside  July  and
August).  Each issue is available ZIPped as well as uncompressed,
and  as  of 1993's issue 2 it's also available in a  Tearoom  BBS
Door  version  (whatever that may mean,  probably  something  MS-
DOS-y).
 Status: Public Domain, online.
 User interface: No.
 Latest known issue: Volume 1 Release B, February 1995.
 Address:   P.O.   Box  595,   Pasadena,  MD  21122,  USA,  email
  dbealer@rah.clark.net.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

RTS Track

 A smoothly looking disk magazine from the Netherlands. The first
three  issues  (all released in 1992) were in  Dutch,  but  after
that it switched to English.  Like "Maggie" and "DBA" (Cf.)  it's
fairly  demo-oriented,  although the crew that makes it  stresses
not to be a demo crew.  This is possible caused by the main  menu
appearance:  A bit like a megademo but still managable.  About 40
were  present  in  Volume 2 Issue  1,  some  of  which  contained
graphics  as  well (medium resolution text  with  low  resolution
pictures  -  pretty slick!).  Issue 2.1 came on  two  disks,  the
second one containing a load of shareware utilities also  written
by RTS, the crew that releases the magazine. The editor was Ferdy
Blaset.  The 2.1 program was not fully Falcon compatible but  you
can get access to everything but the intro,  and the low res pics
in the text flicker a bit.
 After  Volume 2 Issue 1 the editor's ST broke down and  lack  of
funds and support for "RTS Track" have so far caused the magazine
to cease publication. Who knows, one day, it might start again.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes, quite an excellent one.
 Latest known issue: Volume 2 Issue 1.
 Address: Halleyweg 114, NL-3318 CP, Dordrecht, Netherlands.
 Health: Comatose, most likely dead.
 Language: Used to be Dutch (Volume 1), after that English. 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.