Skip to main content
© Vic

 Failsafe pickup: "Smile if you want to sleep with me." And watch
them try to hold back their laugh.


FLOPPYSHOP ACQUIRE RIGHTS TO OMEN BY ESQUIMALT DIGITAL LOGIC INC.
                 a press release from Floppyshop

              Open Multitasking Environment (OMEn)
                               by
                  Esquimalt Digital Logic Inc.


Program Type: Cross Platform Multitasking Operating System
System: Any ST, STE, TT or Falcon. TT and Falcon enhanced.
Memory Required: 512k
Display Type: Colour or mono, RGB or VGA
Price: £20.00
Postage:  UK free,  Europe (including Eire) £2.00,  rest of world
     £4.00

 Floppyshop  have  been appointed UK distributors  for  the  OMEn
multi-tasking  operating system.  OMEn is unique in that it is  a
cross  platform  operating  system which runs on  most  types  of
compter systems.  The version Floppyshop are distributing is  the
Atari  version of OMEn,  but software written to run  under  this
system  may be used on any machine running OMEn  without  further
modification.  The  Mac,  PC and Gemulator versions of  OMEn  are
currently  in  the  final stages of beta  testing  and  an  Amiga
version is also under development. A Power PC version is expected
some time during 1996.

 The  distribution deal with Esquimalt allows Floppyshop to  sell
the  full  commercial  version  of  OMEn  and  accept   developer
registrations  on their behalf.  The main purpose  of  Floppyshop
acting  as  an agent for Esquimalt is to enable UK  customers  to
obtain  their  software quicker and more cheaply  by  eliminating
currency and airmail charges.  We usually carry a number of units
in stock but, should we run out, new stock will take no more than
7 to 10 days to arrive.

 Please  note  that Atari programs cannot be  run  directly  from
OMEn,  but  the  changes  required to the source  code  are  very
minimal  indeed.  Programs  may be developed  using  Atari  based
assemblers  and  compilers  for ease of  use.  Full  details  are
contained  in the developer registration pack.  As we have  said,
once converted,  your program will run on the ST,  Amiga,  PC and
Mac  under  the OMEn system.  It is Esquimalt  Digital's  aim  to
create a truly hardware independent operating system so that your
favourite  applications can run on any computer system.  This  in
itself  will take time to achieve,  but OMEn is already a  stable
robust system,  the result of five years' work, and is undergoing
constant development, something which can only continue with your
support.  Remember,  it's the chicken and egg scenario,  the more
widely  circulated OMEn becomes and the greater the support  from
users,  the more applications will be developed for it.  A number
of developers have already purchased registration packs so it  is
only a matter of time before third party software starts becoming
available.

 You   will   notice  that  the  cost  of  purchasing   OMEn   is
substantially  lower than that of almost all other  multi-tasking
operating systems. This has been done in order to get OMEn widely
circulated and used.  The developer registrations are even  lower
in order to encourage third party development.  Here's a list  of
OMEn's main features:

 FEATURES

*    The Open Multitasking Environment,  OMEn operating system is
     a   true   pre-emptive    multi-tasking,    modular,    open
     architecture,   component   software  environment   with   a
     graphical interface.  It has many innovative features  which
     make  it very flexible and which make  software  development
     easier.  This  helps developers to quickly  supply  superior
     products for custom use or mass-markets.

*    The SYSTEM CORE ties together all the component software  of
     the system.  It is "ported" - adjusted - to run on each type
     of computer.

*    An  I_O  PORT  or I_O CHANNEL MANAGER is  created  for  each
     hardware port available to the computer.

*    SOFTWARE  PROTOCOL MANAGERS are created for each  peripheral
     device or software protocol to be used with the system.

*    An I_O CHANNEL links a protocol to a port  (eg:  HP-Laserjet
     Printer protocol to Atari-Centronics port) or an I_O channel
     manager handles the entire interface (eg: Atari-Big-Screen).

*    "COMPONENTWARE"  APPLICATION  PROGRAMS are created  for  any
     type of task the computer is to be used for.

*    The SYSTEM CORE,  I_O PORTS and I_O CHANNEL MANAGERS provide
     a uniform interface for all other software regardless of the
     type  of  computer  so  that  the  same  I_O  PROTOCOLS  and
     APPLICATION  SOFTWARE  will  run  on  all  machines  without
     porting or other adaptation.

*    OMEn  is a graphical system and most  communication  between
     various  programs is done by clicking with  the  mouse,  and
     dragging files between windows. Whereas other systems permit
     dragging  between windows of one application  program,  OMEn
     makes  extensive use ofdragging between different  programs'
     windows, simplifying the interface.

*    Atari-Big-Screen  has  a scrolling display which  is  taller
     than  the video screen.  This allows more windows with  less
     clutter.  Moving the mouse "below" the bottom or "above" the
     top  of the screen will automatically scroll the display  up
     or down. (TT-Hirez doesn't scroll).

*    The  system  does not use double  clicking.  Single  clicks,
     right  button  clicks and dragging of files  are  the  usual
     forms of action.  Using the left mouse button with the Shift
     key pressed is the same as using the right mouse button.

*    Two  types  of  mouse  action  messages  can  be  generated:
     Clicking without moving the mouse issues a "Click"  message,
     but moving the mouse with the button held down sends  "Drag"
     commands instead.

*    Mouse  Wrap  lets the mouse go off the left or  top  of  the
     display  and  come back on the  right  or  bottom,  allowing
     faster mouse access to different parts of the display.

*    Overscan.  On the ST and TT,  overscan may be selected if  a
     manual  overscan switch has been installed on the  computer.
     On the Falcon, overscan is effective on RGB monitors only.

*    All of memory acts as a virtual RAM-Disk, as required.

*    New  files are usually created and edited  in-memory,  where
     they can be shared between co-operative applications.

*    Menus are opened from individual windows,  instead of at the
     top  of the display.  There is no overall menu bar  for  the
     system, because all the programs are running at once.

*    This  release  of OMEn is pre-set for typical  Atari  system
     use.  It  has many configuration options for individual  I/O
     Protocols  and Ports.  Protocols (printers and  others)  are
     supplied to licenced users as they become available.

 WHY BUY THE COMMERCIAL VERSION?

*    For  productive  work,  starting  a licenced  copy  of  OMEn
     automatically  installs  your  selected  printer,  sets  the
     display mode,  background picture,  system sounds and  other
     options, and launches your most-used applications.

*    Proceeds  from  licence registrations  provide  funding  for
     continued OMEn availability,  market expansion (resulting in
     more and better software) and upgrades with new features.

*    The  demo version has a limited life and ceases to  function
     from a specified date.

 WHAT EXTRAS DOES THE COMMERCIAL VERSION INCLUDE?

*    Disks with the latest OMEn system & docs for your computer.

*    The  latest  releases of accompanying  OMEn  software,  with
     upgrade to scalable fonts in "Micro-Word" word processor.

*    The latest Printer Protocol Managers.

*    Windows/OS2/TGA/Degas to OMEn bitmap picture converter.

*    Falcon True-colour & Audio support.

*    The ability to save your customised settings and preferences.

*    OMEn  Herald newsletter updates you on the  latest  software
     and developments.

 OMEN DEVELOPER REGISTRATION PACK

Program  Type:  Developers' kit for programmers wishing to  write
     software for the OMEn cross platform multi-tasking operating
     system
System: Any ST, STE, TT or Falcon. TT and Falcon enhanced.
Memory Required: 512k
Display Type: Colour or mono, RGB or VGA
Price: £12.00
Postage:  UK free,  Europe (including Eire) £2.00,  rest of world
     £4.00

 PRODUCT INFORMATION

 The  OMEn SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT KIT allows you to write your  own
OMEn  software or adapt your existing code to make it  compatible
with OMEn.  OMEn programs written and compiled on the ST will run
under  OMEn on the Amiga,  Mac and PC without  modification.  The
disks include an assembler, a C-library (you can use any ST based
C  compiler  as long as it outputs in DRI/GEM  format),  an  icon
creator,  a sample convertor and plenty of assembler source code.
More  important  than any of this is the  programmer's  reference
guide  which  runs to 12 chapters and tells you all you  need  to
know about developing OMEn compatible software.  Please note that
both  the  executables and docs are in OMEn format  so  you  will
require  the OMEn operating system in order to make use  of  this
pack.

 PROGRAMMING WITH OMEN

 Every  effort has been made to make OMEn the  easiest  operating
system  ever  to  write software for,  both  in  concept  and  in
practice. However, most operating systems have access to numerous
development tools for various programming languages,  which  have
been  created  over time.  OMEn,  being newly available  at  this
writing  (Feb 1995),  has few such tools,  although they will  be
easier to write or port than with other systems,  and we can look
forward to their early appearance.

 ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE

 Since  OMEn  was written in Assembly Language,  it  has  a  very
versatile  and  useful  collection  of  Assembly  level  software
development  tools,  including  an  elegant  Eazy`Asm  Structured
Assembler,  a Debugging Monitor,  and the Code-View disassembler.
Debugging tools can work together with the system's Crash  Window
to greatly facilitate debugging of new software.

 C LANGUAGE

 At the time of this writing,  there is a basic "C" start-up  and
interface library. An Atari GEM based C-compiler is required: you
need  one machine running the compiler and another  running  OMEn
for testing it to develop OMEn software in C.  We will create  an
OMEn  based  C compiler this year,  or find a company  who  will.
Anyone  interested in porting a compiler to OMEN  please  contact
us!

 FORTH LANGUAGE

 A FORTH language exists,  and can be made available if there  is
sufficient interest.  Please contact Esquimalt Digital Logic  for
details.

 WHAT DO YOU GET IN THE DEVELOPMENT KIT?

*    Software  Developers' Registration Card entitling you  to  a
     year's  free updates to the kit and free  technical  support
     from Esquimalt.

*    The latest version of Easy-ASM, a structured 68000 assembler.

*    The full 24 page Easy-ASM Manual on disk.

*    The full 325 page Programmers' Reference Manual on disk.

*    OMEn System Equates file.

*    C   Language  Interface  Library  -  lets  you  write   OMEn
     applications using any GEM based Atari C compiler.

*    Code-View  Disassembler which works in conjunction with  the
     built-in  Crash  Window to help you trace and  debug  errors
     quickly and easily.

*    A  second  disk  full  of  example  source  code  and  extra
     development  tools.  This includes the full source  code  to
     Paint-Booth,  Sound-Player, Micro-Word and Printer Protocols
     amongst other things.

 For further information, please contact Floppyshop:

 Floppyshop
 P.O. Box 273
 Aberdeen AB9 8SJ
 Tel. 01224 586208 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.