Skip to main content
© Dieu of Hemoroids

 "Dyslexia is punishment for taking the name of Dog in vain."

      ST NEWS SOFTWARE REVIEW: "SPEED OF LIGHT" VERSION 3.8
                      by Mark Stephen Smith
        (Taken from his Atari Web Pages, with permission)

 "Speed  of  Light"  has been around for many years  now  on  the
Atari.  Starting  off  as a GIF viewer it has  developed  into  a
powerful picture viewer and colour editor. Its latest incarnation
is  version  3.8  containing  mainly  bug  fixes  over   previous
versions. "Speed of Light", or SOL as I will refer to it from now
on,  is  Shareware and whilst perfectly useable has some  of  the
more  advanced  options crippled in such a way  as  to  encourage
registration.  The whole set of tools and their use is too  great
to  go  into in detail,  even in an review  this  large,  I  will
however try and give a flavour of their use and power so you  can
get a feel for the program as a whole.

What is SOL and what does it offer?

 SOL firstly is a picture viewer,  within the program however  it
sports  a wide variety of features so as to get the best  out  of
your pictures.  It works on all Atari formats  (ST,  Falcon,  TT,
Mega)  and  works in all resolutions in up  to  256  colours.  It
supports a wide variety of formats and is one of the fastest  GIF
file handlers on an Atari. SOL now supports the DSP in the Falcon
for JPEG decoding.  It is MultiTos compatible and recommended for
maximum speed to be run in conjunction with NVDI or Warp.

Registering the Program

 This  review is based upon the registered version of  "Speed  of
Light".  To  register  is simple,  just start  the  program  (see
"Getting Started" below). Upon loading you will be greeted with a
screen  allowing you to enter your  registration  details.  Enter
your  details  and  choose "Print EZForm",  this  will  create  a
document which can be printed or saved to disk with your  details
which  you  send to the author (or  local  registration  handler)
along with the registration fee.  They in turn will generate your
registration key.
 Once you have received this key,  load the program and enter  it
along with your details,  the program then becomes the registered
version  and will work without any features being  disabled.  You
only  have  to register once,  with subsequent loads  taking  you
straight to the main menu.
 This form of registration is quick and easy and your details and
keycode  only have to be entered into future versions for you  to
receive a full registered upgrade.

Getting Started

 The  program  is available from many PD  libraries,  FTP  sites,
Stuart  Denman's  and my Atari Web pages,  as well as  making  an
appearance on several Atari magazine cover disks. What you get is
the   un-registered  version  of  the  program,   with  all   the
documentation, supporting files and image files.
 Using  the shareware version without registering offers all  the
facilities you get with the full version with the difference that
some  of  the more advanced features such as  warping  will  have
blank  lines in the pictures at regular intervals,  and that  you
are  limited to only loading one JPEG image  per  session.  Other
than  these limitations placed to encourage you to  register  you
have full access to the program.
 Running  the  program couldn't be simpler.  Just  click  on  the
program  file  "SPOFLT38.APP",  after a short while you  will  be
asked to enter your registration details,  if you don't have  any
you can continue by choosing "Cancel".  This will now take you to
the main options screen.
 Whatever resolution you load in will be the screen size used  by
the program, and the number of colours in that resolution will be
used (up to 256 colours).  On all machines but the Falcon however
you  do have the option to change the resolution from within  the
program.

Main Options Screen

 From  the main options screen all the options and access to  the
more  advanced options are available.  Here's a quick summary  of
the  main options screen features (starting from the  top  left),
some of which I'll describe in greater detail later:

 Picture Statistics - Various information on the picture such  as
name, size and palette size.

 "H" Button - Histogram of current image.

 "P" Button - Optimises image palette.

 Machine  Specifications  - Various machine information  such  as
computer  being used,  resolution,  palette,  and the  number  of
colours.

 "Delta"  Button - Allows the changing of resolution on ST's  and
TT's within the  program.

 "3-Bars" Button - Allows setting of preferences and true  colour
preferences.

 Picture  Number  Slider - A slider to easily  move  through  the
pictures in memory.

 Display  Mode  Menu - A pop-up menu that allows  you  to  select
between colour or shades (grey scale). On the TT "TTGrey" mode is
available which allows 256 shades of grey.

 Downward  Arrow  Button - Makes image as close  to  original  as
possible  by  setting sliders to zero and  histograms  to  1-to-1
transformation.

 "Complex" Button (Colour Transformations) - Toggles between  the
additive  colour transformation options and the histogram  colour
transformation options.

 Additive  Colour Transform Slider - Available when "Complex"  is
not  selected.  These  three sliders one for each  of  the  prime
colours allow you to add to or subtract the  RGB elements of  the
picture.  If  moved equally together can be used to  brighten  or
darken the picture.

 Colour  Reduction  Menu - If the picture contains  more  colours
than the display this can be used to decide how the palette  will
be  reduced.  "Frequency"  is  the default  with  "By  Rank"  and
"Influence" being the other choices.

 Colour  Rank  "Button"  -  This  switches  to  the  colour  rank
histogram  editor  so  you  can  define  the  ranks  of  the  RGB
planes.

 Complex "Button" (Colour Reduction/Selection) - Toggles  between
simple contrast slider bars and histogram colour contrast.

 Colour  Contrast/Separation Slider - These three sliders  define
the minimum seperation between the chosen colours used to display
the image.

 Horizontal/Vertical  Size - Allows you to enter  the  horizontal
and vertical pixel sizes for the images to be scaled to.

 Axis Effect Menu - Allows you to choose horizontal,  vertical or
both with respect to how the buttons (below) effect the axes.

 "O" Button - Sets scaling to original size of image.

 "A"  Button - Calculates the aspect ratio based on the  effected
axis when scaling.

 "-" Button - Halves the selected axis.

 "+" Button - Doubles the selected axis.

 "Fltr" Button - Toggles filtered scaling on/off.

 "Set"  Button - Takes you to the filtered scaling  dialogue  for
setting filter type  and scaling.

 "Fit"  Button  - Makes the image fit the current  resolution  in
size as best as possible whilst maintaining the aspect ratio.

 "Mous" Button - When highlighted the mouse will be displayed  on
the display  screen, otherwise it is hidden.

 "SmDr" Button - Toggles on/off "Smooth Draw" mode. This is where
flickering  is used to increase number of colours you  choose  to
turn it on or off when the image is being drawn to speed up image
draws.

 "Warp" Button - Takes you to the Warp dialogue where you can set
the warping and stretching effects.

 Flicker  Contrast  Slider - Sets the  maximum  contrast  allowed
between  flickering colours.  When on the far left flickering  is
off.

 Dither  Pattern Menu - This menu allows you to select  different
dither patterns.

 "Set"  Button -  Takes  you to the dithering  dialogue  to  give
detailed control over dithering.

 "Desk"  Button  -  Allows  access to  accessories  or  to  other
programs when under MultiTOS.  Options for SOL are also available
as drop down menus.

 "?" Button - Displays credits,  shareware information and amount
of free memory.

 "Purge" Button - Allows you to remove the current image  freeing
memory. When double clicked on removes all images.

 "Colours"  Button - Takes you to the colour editor (not  allowed
in  Shades,  Greyscale mode or any resolution using less than  16
colours).

 ">>" Button - Takes you to the slideshow dialogue where you  can
set  the  different slideshow parameters such as  start  and  end
images,  pause length between images,  and forwards or  backwards
play. Once set up choosing "Display" from the main options screen
will go through the images for the slideshow.  Turn the slideshow
off to view single images again.

 As  you can see the program is packed to the brim with  features
with  these just being a brief summary of the  options  available
from  the main menu,  that's before we even start to look at  the
advanced features.
 You may think that with all these features it difficult to  use,
but  the  control  for  the  most  part  is  straightforward  and
intuitive leaving the user only having to reference the manual to
look at some of the more advanced features and to see some of the
possible   shortcuts  and  tips  available  to   achieve   better
results.

Using SOL for the first time

 Upon loading SOL you are most likely going to want to load  some
images,  to  do  this you select the "Add" button.  You  will  be
presented with the file selector where you can choose an image or
use wild cards to load multiple images. Getting files into SOL is
very  easy.  Apart  from the methods mentioned above it  is  also
possible  to  load  images by dragging the  files  over  the  SOL
program icon on the desktop (on later versions of TOS), therefore
starting  the program with several loaded images.  There is  even
support  for  other  file selectors such  as  Selectric  allowing
multiple images to be selected and loaded in one operation.
 SOL supports the following image formats for loading:

 GIF (.GIF)
 JPEG (.JPG)
 Degas Uncompressed (.PI?)
 Degas Compressed (.PC?)
 Prism Paint (.PNT)
 GEM (X) Image Format (.IMG)

 and the following for saving:

 GIF
 Degas Un/Compressed
 Prism Paint
 GEM (X) Image Format

 The speed at which it handles GIF files is excellent and  Falcon
owners  are  catered  for with DSP JPEG  decoding  (although  the
reduction  from true colour to 256 colours does slow this  down).
Once  you  have an image you will most likely want  to  view  it.
Selecting  the  "Display"  button will bring  the  image  to  the
screen. If the image is larger than the screen you can scroll the
screen by moving the mouse pointer from the centre of the screen.
The  further  you move it from the centre the faster  the  screen
scrolls in that direction.
 Pressing  the  right  button returns you  to  the  main  options
screen.  If  you want to see the whole image at once clicking  on
the  "Fit"  button will shrink the image  proportionally  to  the
screen.  If  the image uses more colours than you have  available
SOL uses clever techniques to expand the palette,  however if the
results  still aren't good enough then it is possible to  improve
the picture in a number of ways.
 The  first way to improve the image when lacking colours  is  to
adopt  one of the many dither patterns.  Clicking on the  "Dither
Patrn:" box will bring up a menu with a choice of dither patterns
with the default being no dither pattern. This menu has two empty
slots  into  which you can load dither patterns.  To  access  the
dither options and to load a pattern into one of the slots select
the "Set" button next to "Dither Patrn:",  this will take you  to
the dither options screen.
 SOL  comes  with 3 standard dither patterns with the  option  of
loading additional dither patterns as provided with the  package.
These  dither  patterns are in the same format as  that  used  by
GemView and are therefore interchangeable.
 Once at the dither options screen you can do a number of things.
You  have  the choice of changing options on  the  FIS  (Filtered
Image  Scaling) or normal dithering patterns.  The  Filter  (FIS)
options  allows  you  to either choose no  pattern,  one  of  the
defaults or to load one of the files available. The normal dither
options  has the same options plus the addition of being able  to
change the gradient steps and contrast of the pattern chosen.
 Other  options that can be adopted to improve the image  quality
when the current resolution doesn't support enough colours is  to
use the "Flicker Contrast" slider.  When moving this slider  will
define the contrast level of the flicker and therefore the degree
of  flicker visible.  When moved to the far left it is  off  with
possible  values  up to 255.  Using this  increases  the  palette
available  and  gives you extra colours in which to  display  the
picture.  The  disadvantage is a degree of flicker is  introduced
into  the image when viewed and it slows draw time if flicker  is
not turned off with the "SmDr" button.

Short Cuts

 There are many shortcuts available in SOL but keyboard shortcuts
are  not available generally as a rule in the window  and  option
screens.  This has been done deliberately so as not to clash with
programs  that provide shortcuts  automatically.  However  whilst
viewing an image using the "Display" button short cuts to perform
a  number of simple tasks and to take you to different  parts  of
the  program  become available.  This  includes  everything  from
changing  what image is being viewed and flipping or scaling  it,
to calling up the colour editor.<p>
 A  thing that people often miss when viewing a picture  is  that
pressing  and holding the left mouse button will bring up a  list
of  features  available  for manipulating  the  currently  viewed
image.  This list includes the keyboard shortcuts were applicable
and  makes  the  program  very user friendly  as  it  saves  time
flipping between the picture and options screens.

Colour Editing

 The  tools provided by SOL for colour editing and enhancing  are
its most powerful features,  and is what makes it stand out  from
other picture viewers.
 Colour editing is divided between the RGB additive sliders  that
add  or  subtract from the RGB elements of an image in  a  linear
fashion,  the complex RGB controls which use the histogram method
of  alterering  the RGB balance throughout  the  image,  and  the
colour  editor  which gives you direct control over  the  palette
used and the colours within it.
 I  will look in further detail now at the later two elements  of
the  package.  Namely  the  "Histogram Editor"  and  the  "Colour
Editor"

The Histogram Editor

 This  is  available  for use to control  either  the  colour  or
contrast of a picture. I will look at its use when applied to the
colour  aspect of an image.  To access the Histogram  Editor  you
must select the "Complex" button in the colour options area. This
replaces the RGB sliders with 3 histograms,  one for each of  the
RGB elements. Clicking on any one of the histograms will take you
the the Histogram Editor.
 On this screen the histogram of the colour selected is  enlarged
to fill a large portion of the screen.  Moving the mouse over the
histogram and clicking sets the level at that point.  If the left
mouse  button is held down whilst moving over the  histogram  you
effectively draw the histogram for that colour. Switching between
the histograms for changes to the three colours is easy using the
three  buttons  at  the  top of the screen to  take  you  to  the
appropriate  colour.  These  are the "Red",  "Green"  and  "Blue"
buttons.
 Along  the bottom of the screen are several buttons for  editing
the shape of the histogram,  these are the  "Stretch",  "Squash",
"Invert",  "Flip"  and  arrow buttons (where  the  arrow  buttons
scroll the histogram). You can also "Copy" and "Paste" histograms
to any of the other histograms therefore copying the shape to one
of  the  other colours.  It is possible to double  click  on  the
"Copy" button to automatically copy the current histogram to  the
other two. All changes can be reversed with the use of the "Undo"
button.  It  is also possible to automatically define  the  shape
using either the "Linear" or "Gamma" buttons.
 Linear creates a step from left to right with a one-to-one slope
and gives you the shape you usually see, namely a triangle.
 When  you  select Gamma for gamma correction you  will  have  to
enter  the  gamma value into the popup  dialogue.  Selecting  the
"Generate"  button does the correction with values  greater  than
one darkening the image, and less than one brightening the image.
Gamma  correction  does  this without  creating  washout  in  the
picture.
 Once  you  are happy with your changes you can select  the  "OK"
button  to accept them and return the the main options screen  or
the "Cancel" button to reject all changes made and return to  the
options screen.
 There  are several histograms available for you to load and  try
out.

The Colour Editor

 To  enter  the Colour Editor from the main  options  screen  you
select the "Colours" button.  Once selected you will be taken  to
the  Colour  Editor  screen.  Across the top of  the  screen  ten
colours are displayed with the colour value above them. Using the
"VDI  Order"  button  you can toggle between  the  colours  being
displayed in VDI order or Device-Dependent order.  You can scroll
the  ten  colours through the image palette by either  using  the
Arrows at either side of the colour boxes, or by using the Slider
Bar just below the colour boxes.
 Colours can be selected for editing by clicking on them in their
boxes  (selected colours are highlighted with an inner  box).  To
alter  a selected colour you move the three Slider Bars  for  the
RGB elements.  Boxes marked with an "X" in the palette are unused
colours.
 Buttons  in this editor are divided into two areas,  the  upper-
left  buttons for manipulating two or more colours (known as  the
"Toolbox"),  and the lower left/right hand buttons which are  for
switching to other dialogue boxes,  undoing,  or for other global
operations.
 Buttons  within the Toolbox are used in the same way.  You  must
select  the  range  of colours you wish to  apply  the  tool  to.
Colours  selected  are  reffered to as  "hot"  colours  and  once
selected  the  tool will perform the operation over  the  set  of
colours selected.
 Tools available are:

 "Copy" - Copies first colour to second.

 "Swap" - Exchanges two colours.

 "Fill" - Fills whole range with the first colour.

 "<" Rotate - Rotates the palette left with wrap around.

 ">" Rotate - Rotates the palette right with wrap around.

 "Sort  Group" - Sorts the colours within the range  into  groups
based on their RGB values.

 "Gradient" - Fills in all the colours in the range blending  the
colour from the first to the last.

 "Sort  DK  >  LT"  - Sorts the range from  the  darkest  to  the
lightest.

 "Sort  LT  >  DK" - Sorts the range from  the  lightest  to  the
darkest.

 The functional buttons are the other group of buttons associated
with the Colour Editor. The functional buttons include:

 "Match" - Toggle on/off. This causes SOL to match changes in the
image to the new palette. If it doesn't use one of the colours in
the map it will mark it with an X. When not selected changes will
appear in the displayed image.

 "Display" - Display the picture.

 "Undo" - Undoes any palette changes.

 "Cpy/Swp" - Allows you to copy or swap the palette with  another
image.

 "Image" - Allows you to edit another image's palette.

 "Rescan" - Reverts back to the orignal palette.

 "Select"  -  Allows you to click on any pixel in the  image  and
return to the editor with that colour selected for editing.

 "Take"  -  Works the same as Select but colour  currently  being
edited takes on the colour that pixel had in the original image.

 "Load" - Loads a .PAL palette file into the current colour map.

 "Save" - Saves current palette in .PAL file.

 "Cancel"  -  Aborts  any changes made and  returns  to  previous
screen.

 "Options" - Goes to the Options Dialogue.

Filtered Image Scaling

 Filtered  Image  Scaling (FIS) is used to smooth  out  or  alter
images  that have been enlarged or reduced,  whilst it will  help
improve images that are scaled in this manner it has the drawback
that it is very calculation intensive and therefore takes a  long
time  to draw.  As such it is not a quick way to view images  but
can be used to improve them.
 To  use filtering you must turn the filter on by  selecting  the
"Fltr"  button and use the "Set" button to go to the  FIS  option
screen.  Once  on the option screen you will be presented with  a
selection of menus, buttons and editable fields.<p>
 The  first  menu  is  the "Filter  Type"  which  can  be  either
"Standard"  or  "Enhancing".  The second menu is  "Filter  Curve"
which has the options of "Box",  "Triangle", "Cubic", "B-Spline",
"Lancos3", "Mitchell" or "Nelson". With each offering a different
filter   curve.   Other  options  include  toggle  switches   for
"Filtering On/Off",  "Flip Horizontal" and "Flip Vertical", "Wrap
Image at Edges" and "Scale Filter".  Editable fields are for  the
"Height",  "Horizontal" and "Vertical". Information is also given
on the amount of memory required for the filter.
 When the enhancing Filter Type is selected the Filter Curve menu
contains different filters specifically for enhancing the  image.
These  are  "Sharpening",  "Quad-Step",  "Raised  Edge",  "Smooth
Bias",  "Sharp  Bias",  "Linear Bias" or  "Diffusion".  Enhancing
filters generally work better when image scaling is a multiple of
the  original  image.  Often  you will get  banding  due  to  the
inability of these filters to shift phase.
 Some  filters such as Sharpening and Diffusion work best on  the
original image whereas others work best on enlarged images.  Some
of these other filters can be used to create interesting  effects
on  the  pixels themselves such as the Sharp  Bias  filter  which
produces  a 3D pixel effect.  Some of the filters are  assymetric
and can therefore be flipped.  Filters can also be wrapped at the
edge  of the image or faded.  Both have drawbacks in that  fading
will  darken  the  edge of the image  whilst  wrapped  edges  can
produce duplicate pixels close to the edges.
 When  reducing  an  image without FIS  image  quality  is  lost.
Standard  filters are used to accurately take into  account  lost
lines and improve detail.  When "Scale Filter" is selected it  is
possible to blur filters.  Small scaling values will not blur the
filter but larger values will increase level of blurring.  Values
less than one produce a weird patterned darkening effect.
 Filtering  is a powerful tool within SOL and as such requires  a
lot  of experimentation to achieve the best results along with  a
lot  of  patience.  When working with FIS on large images  it  is
ideal to have a lot of memory available.

Image Warping

 (Please  note that image warping cannot be used  in  conjunction
with FIS)

 Clicking  on the "Warp" button will take you to the warp  option
screen.  Here  you  can enter a variety of  values  for  "Width",
"Horizontal Shift",  "Height" and "Vertical Centre".  Along  side
these options are the menus "Warping Pattern" and  "Repeat".  The
first menu contains the following list of warp transformations:

 Off (No warping)
 Flat
 Linear
 Cubic
 B-Spine
 Plateau
 Sine Wave

 The Repeat menu has the options of "Once" or  "Periodic".  Using
Warping  scan lines are stretched and shifted in various ways  in
order  to make an interesting change in the  image.  All  numbers
entered  are  relative  to the image itself so if  the  image  is
enlarged twice the warping figures will be scaled  likewise.  The
warping is centred around what is reffered to as the "bulge"  and
can be repeated using the periodic bulge.  This centre is usually
the peak or lowest point of the curve when warping.
 Whilst  the distortions provided prove no real  practical  value
they  are fun to try and are worth experimenting with to  achieve
some interesting effects.

Scripts

 SOL has the ability to read special scripts which can be created
by  the  user,  which  are to be used  in  conjunction  with  the
slideshow.  With  these simple scripts it is possible  to  assign
individual  times  for images to stay on screen,  as well  as  to
select  whether loaded images stay in memory or are  loaded  each
time to save memory. You can even select files with wildcards for
use in the slideshow.
 You also have the option of viewing one image whilst the next is
being loaded and decompressed. Other features include the ability
to define how the image will look when displayed by making use of
warping,  scaling, truecolour reduction, etc. SOL will follow all
these  commands  from  a script without the  user  having  to  do
anything.
 This is a very useful and welcome additional feature within SOL.

Summary

 SOL is an excellent program,  with a wealth of features it  will
keep  you experimenting with it for some time to  come.  All  the
features  are very fast and provide excellent results.  SOL  must
have the most comprehensive set of colour features I've seen in a
single package and this alone makes it worthwhile to use. Combine
this  with  it's speed and compatibility and you have  a  package
that every Atari owner who likes to view pictures should support.
 Of  course there are some limitations.  There is no true  colour
support  and  there  is  a  limited  number  of  picture  formats
supported.  JPEG's are memory hungry and can be slow but when put
against  the positive things it has to offer these seem  to  fade
away. This package is a winner.

Scores

Ease of Use = 82

 Although designed well with many shortcuts and a good  intuitive
design  this doesn't score as high as it could due to the  nature
of the package.  Many of the more advanced features are difficult
to use and take a long time to master and although the program is
well  done these problems can't be overcome with  anything  other
than experimentation to achieve the right results.

Features = 91

 For  a picture viewer this program is packed with  features  and
represents  excellent value for money.  Colour-wise nearly  every
option  is  supported  that you could ever  want  and  each  area
implemented   has  been  thought  out  very  well  and  is   very
comprehensive.  This said there are some features in this current
version that have yet to be implemented and with these the  score
would be higher.

Use of Computer = 90

 Despite  the  fact  it  is not aimed  at  any  one  machine  and
therefore  allowing for clever programming and optimisations  for
that  machine this does an excellent job of taking  advantage  of
the  extra  facilities of whatever machine you are  on.  This  is
shown by the support for the TT and the DSP in the Falcon, making
its use of machine excellent with most operations being lightning
fast whatever the system.

Compatibility = 96

 What can I say it works with and makes the most of all the Atari
range. This review is based on the time I spent on the package on
both  the  ST and the Falcon.  In all the time I  spent  on  both
machines  the only problem I ever had was on the Falcon and  that
turned  out  to  be a problem with the Overscan  software  I  was
running.  It evens supports file selectors,  screen accelerators,
MultiTos, and some graphics cards such as the NOVA.

Speed = 92

 Everything  with  the  exception of FIS  scaling  is  very  fast
(although  considering the intensive nature of this it is  to  be
expected).  Warping  can take a little time as can JPEG  decoding
but  again  this is to be expected.  "Speed of  Light"  certainly
lives up to its name.

Documentation = 84

 Overall  the documentation is good but being included as a  text
file  on  disk  for you to print out does limit  its  ability  to
illustrate  some  things  clearly.   The  ability  to  see   more
screenshots  and  illustrations  of use  along  with  some  small
tutorials would help more.  Reading the manual on it's own can be
a  little confusing at times unless sat in front of the  computer
trying  everything  out.  Also some areas are  skimmed  over  two
quickly in the manual.

Overall = 91

 An absolute must for anyone with an Atari who views pictures and
has a need to enhance the palette or clear up pictures. With only
a few minor flaws,  it is an excellent package with good  support
fast times for use,  very comprehensive tools, a well thought out
design  and excellent cross platform compatibilty.  Get this  and
register it now; you won't regret it! 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.