Skip to main content
© Deekay

Chapter Thirty Two

                 "We could always shoot one of the philosophers."
                                                    --David Gries


 "I don't see the problem - the woman's obviously guilty."
 "So you say, Davey. But what about the contract the guy signed?"
 "Doesn't come into it - a person can't sign away his life.  This
is murder."
 "First off, Davey boy, a person can sign away his own life if he
wants to."
 "Blasphemy!"
 "Yeah,  yeah,  yeah - sure, Davey," Colin sighed, dismissively -
and not for the first time, "Whatever you say - it's still legal.
Look,"  Simoney allowed a note of  let's-be-reasonable-about-this
to creep into both his body language and his tone of voice, "If I
want to commit suicide, I can do it, right?"
 "Suicide  is  against  God's Law!"  yelled  the  Reverend  David
Sessions. Then, under his breath, he was heard to mutter, "Though
in your case, I'm sure the Almighty would make an exception."
 "Fucking Hell, Davey - is there anything that's not against your
God's  fucking  Law?"  the  particle  physicist  grabbed  healthy
handfuls of his own wavy, dark brown hair in frustration. Damnit,
he thought, as his artificial right thumb squeaked, irritatingly,
now  I'm  going to have to listen to another  lecture  about  not
using 'foul language.'
 Five  minutes later,  when Sessions had finally wound  down  his
monologue  on  'Satan's Speech,' Dot managed to get  a  word  in.
"Reverend Sessions, will you please simply grant that - under our
man-made  British  legal  system - a  person's  life  belongs  to
himself?
 "My life is my property, and yours is your own." Dot held up her
hand,  palm-outward, to silence the vicar's knee-jerk criticisms,
"No,  don't say anything right away - think about it for a little
while first. Please?" she added, imploringly.
 Sessions  concentrated  for a little  while,  mulling  over  the
various  implications  of  the proposition  -  and  his  possible
responses to each interpretation. Eventually, he said, "Alright -
I'll grant that,  in this man-made - and,  therefore, imperfect -
legal system, what you say is the case."
 "Thank you," Colin Simoney said, his voice dripping irony.
 Dot  darted  a  warning  glance towards  the  physicist  -  who,
understanding,  was  immediately silenced - before going  on,  to
Sessions,  "Thank you, Reverend. Now, if we grant - as you agreed
- that my life is my own property,  then I can dispose of it as I
see fit.  In other words, I can commit suicide if I wish to. It's
legal  under  the  British system is all that I mean  -  I'm  not
implying  anything about higher moralities  here,  okay?  Do  you
agree that it's legal?" Dot said, carefully.
 Sessions,  once again, thought carefully before replying, "Okay.
I  will  accept that suicide - though a sinful  act  and  against
God's Law - is,  nevertheless,  not prohibited by this imperfect,
man-made legal system."
 Colin breathed out suddenly,  gasping slightly.  He hadn't  even
been  aware that he'd been holding his breath while  waiting  for
the priest's answer.  Dot,  however,  merely pushed the  argument
onwards - ever onwards.
 "Now,  Reverend," Dot said,  "If I can commit suicide legally  -
under British law, that is - then I can also ask somebody to kill
me.  If they agree to do so then that is basically the same as my
killing myself. Yes?"
 Sessions  thought a little longer over this conundrum.  Then  he
said,  clearly and distinctly,  if somewhat hesitantly,  "I...I'm
not sure." There was some anguish on the vicar's face - and  this
was  the first time since the start of jury training that he  had
confessed to not being sure about anything.
 Dot's  forehead was furrowed with compassion as  she  explained,
"Think of it this way," she said,  "If I kill myself using a  gun
then  I am committing suicide - the gun is merely my  instrument,
yes?" Sessions nodded,  so Dot went on, "If, on the other hand, I
ask  somebody else to kill me - and they agree - then that  other
person
  is  my  instrument.  And so,  in that  case  also,  I  am
committing suicide. Yes?"
 Sessions shook his head in disagreement,  "A man is not a gun  -
not a mere object.  A man has free will - if he kills you then it
is murder, regardless of whether you asked him to or not."
 Colin Simoney broke in, "Perhaps I can help. Look, Reverend," he
said, careful to avoid the appellation 'Davey-Boy,' which he knew
annoyed Sessions,  "You've agreed that my life is my own property
- under British law - yes?"
 "Correct," Sessions said, stiffly, "Under British law."
 "Well,  then,  think of the agreement between two parties as  me
giving that piece of my property - my life - to the other person.
Once it's their property, they can destroy it - kill me - if they
wish. And, under British law, that's all perfectly okay because I
freely gave my life to them. Do you see?"
 Sessions's  face  clouded  for two or three  minutes  before  he
looked up,  a gleam in his eye, "Okay - I see that that would not
be  murder.  Not under Britain's imperfect legal  system.  Though
morally, in God's Law, it is murder, of course."
 "Of  course," Dot and Colin said,  in unison - relieved to  have
finally got the message across to the mule-headed priest.
 "I  do have one question,  though," that turbulent priest  said,
innocently.
 Warily, Dot asked, "Yes, Reverend?"
 "I accept that - under British law - one person can freely  make
an  agreement  with another for that other person  to  kill  him.
Then,  while  the  agreement stands,  that person can  be  killed
without fear of prosecution. Do I have that right?" he asked.
 "Sounds  okay to me," Dot said.  Eyebrows raised  questioningly,
she glanced about her and received affirming nods from the  other
three.
 "My question, then, is whether you agree that the important word
is  'freely.' The agreement must be freely entered into  by  both
people.  If, say, Jeff forces James to thumbprint an agreement at
gunpoint then that agreement would not be valid - it wouldn't  be
legal. Is that right?"
 Now  it  was Dot's turn to consider for a  little  while  before
replying.  "I think you're right," she said,  "But - to be on the
safe side. Eris," she said, inflecting her voice just so.
 "How can I help you, Dot?" came the contralto tones of the VAS.
 "Eris  -  what  is  the  answer  to  Reverend  Sessions's   last
question?"
 There was a small pause - Eris was currently dealing with fifty-
two   separate  groups  of  five  jurors  or   potential   jurors
simultaneously - then the VAS's soft voice answered,  "The answer
is  'yes,'  Dot - an agreement is only legally  valid  if  freely
entered into.  One of the major tasks of a jury,  in fact, can be
to  determine  whether or not a particular agreement  was  freely
entered into."
 "Eris,"  butted in Colin Simoney,  "Why was this  not  mentioned
during our training?"
 "Because  the  fact is one of those which a  potential  jury  is
expected to work out for itself, Colin."
 "I see," Dot said to herself.  Dot turned now to the priest, "It
seems that you were correct, Reverend Sessions."
 "Thank you," the priest said, stiffly half-bowing - and offering
a thin-lipped smile, the first sign of humour he had exhibited at
any time in the past two weeks.
 "The  question  we have to answer,  then," said  Gordon  Bowman,
unexpectedly breaking in to the conversation,  "Is whether or not
this particular agreement was entered into freely on both  sides.
I  take it we're agreed that the agreement itself was  sufficient
to permit the killing?" he added, to immediate nods from three of
his  fellow  jurors  - and one rather reluctant  nod  from  David
Sessions.
 "The  agreement  was thumb-printed by this  John  Basil  fellow,
wasn't it?" asked Colin Simoney.  As the other jurors agreed,  he
went  on,  "And  there were no threats of violence if  he  didn't
sign?"
 Again,  the  rest of the jury nodded their agreement,  and  Eris
added,  unprompted, "The video-records of the lab confirm that no
violence  whatsoever  was mentioned  or  suggested,  beyond  that
implied in the agreement itself."
 Dot's  glance and tone of voice changed to VAS-commanding  style
as  she asked,  "Eris,  how broad a spectrum is covered by  those
records  -  that is,  do the laboratory's  video-records  contain
sufficient information to register the level of stress which John
Basil was under?"
 "Yes,   Dot,"   the  VAS  replied,   immediately.   Those   same
psychologists  who  had programmed the PPATE (Putting  People  At
T
heir Ease) segments of its program were also responsible for the
tone of voice used here - which was designed to encourage further
questions along the same lines.
 "Eris," she went on,  using the same inflections, "Do the levels
of  stress  recorded  show sufficient  grounds  to  suggest  that
threats were used to obtain the agreement?"
 There  was  a long pause before the VAS  responded.  The  jurors
looked  at each other in surprise at the length of time this  was
taking  -  they  were all,  by this  time,  used  to  an  almost-
instantaneous response from a computer.
 The  delay could have been caused by the huge quantity of  video
information which Eris needed to process in order to answer Dot's
question. The delay also could have been caused by the computer's
having  to spend an inordinate amount of time processing a  large
number  of complex requests from the fifty-odd other  juries  and
potential  juries which it was coordinating.  It could have  been
caused by a combination of these factors.  In fact,  however, the
delay was not caused by any of these means.
 Rather,  the programming of this particular VAS was the cause in
this instance - programming which had been deliberately  designed
to  introduce a pause of just such a length when the question  it
was  asked called for an answer based on borderline or  ambiguous
data,  the length of pause increasing by just this amount as  the
answer had to be based on less and less clear-cut data.
 The psychologists had done their work well - by the time the VAS
answered  Dot's  question,  all  five members of  her  jury  were
becoming  slightly  uneasy,  and increasingly  certain  that  the
stress  levels  obtained via the video-records were  the  key  to
solving this case.
 "No," was Eris's eventual reply,  its voice inflecting just  so.
There was quite a lengthy pause, as the five humans looked at one
another,  reflecting on the VAS's tone of voice. If I didn't know
better
,  Dot  thought  to herself,  I'd think that  computer  was
subconsciously expressing uncertainty about its answer
.
 "There  appears  to be some doubt here," Bowman  said,  after  a
while, "Eris," he inflected, "Display Mr Basil's personal details
again, please."
 "Everything, Gordon?" the VAS asked, for clarification, "Or just
the records of his MoneyCard account transactions?"
 Gordon  Bowman looked surprised - the computer did  not  usually
make  bald recommendations such as this.  Dot answered  for  him,
however,  saying,  "Eris,  just  the  MoneyCard records  for  the
moment."
 The details of John Basil's MoneyCard account appeared in a text
file  on the Terminal before the five  (potential)  jurors.  Dot,
seated at the keyboard,  used the mouse to scroll rapidly through
to  the  end of the account - the day of Basil's  death.  As  she
watched,  she saw a detailed listing of transactions as small  as
five  or ten pence - records of the purchase of minor items  such
as cigarette papers.
 A  few  mouse  clicks and key presses  soon  filtered  out  such
minutiae,  however,  leaving  only  transactions of  one  hundred
pounds  and over in the listing.  The size of the displayed  file
shrank significantly.  Then,  suddenly, there they were - records
of  John  Basil's mortgage payments,  clear and  obvious  on  the
screen.
 The Reverend David Sessions cleared his throat before saying, "I
suspect  that  these records may well explain why  Mr  Basil  was
willing  to take part in Professor Dowes's experiments -  and  go
some  way towards explaining the ambiguity of the  stress  levels
recorded in the video records."
 "Okay," Simoney said, "Basil might have felt driven, by economic
pressures, to obtain money any legal way he could. His consent to
the waiving agreement was apparently freely given, however."
 "I think it probably was not, in fact, Colin," Sessions said. At
the others's looks of surprise,  he went on, "Oh, Professor Dowes
might  have  believed  it was freely  given,  but  this  kind  of
economic pressure," he gestured towards the screen, taking in the
damning financial difficulties of John Basil,  "Well,  I think it
could be considered to be a threat."
 "I  disagree,   Reverend,"  Dot  broke  in,  "Basil's  financial
problems  could have been resolved fairly easily,  by  retraining
for  example.  There  was  no compulsion to take  part  in  risky
medical experiments."
 "I'd say that Dowes exploited Basil's vulnerability," the  vicar
responded, stubbornly, "Whether consciously or subconsciously."
 Simoney  shook his  head,  slowly,  in  disagreement,  "Firstly,
Reverend  Sessions,"  he said,  "There is no way  that  Professor
Dowes  could  have been reasonably expected to  know  of  Basil's
financial status."
 Sessions reluctantly nodded,  though he seemed lost in  thought.
Nonetheless,  the professor went on, "More importantly - If Basil
chose to risk death, rather than retraining or accepting charity,
as his method of ensuring that his family kept a roof over  their
heads...
 "Well,  I happen to think that such a choice is not the best one
he could have made, but he had every right to make it."
 At these words, the Reverend Sessions - to the others's surprise
- abandoned this line of attack.  He raised his eyes and  changed
his tone of voice to address the VAS,  "Eris," he said,  "Give us
the wording of the circumstances in which existing agreements may
be waived, please."
 "Certainly,  Reverend,"  the cultured voice responded  from  the
concealed  loudspeakers,  "'Any  two individuals  of  full  adult
status  may enter into an agreement to waive all or part  of  any
other   agreement   which  already  exists  between   those   two
individuals, provided only that the new agreement is entered into
freely  by  both  individuals concerned and that  each  is  fully
informed  as  to  the  likely consequences  of  waiving  the  old
agreement.'
 "There  is also a list of suggestions regarding the phrasing  of
the  waiving  agreement,  along  with several  examples  of  such
agreements and their consequences,  Reverend.  Do you wish me  to
read those two lists also?" the VAS asked.
 "No,  thank  you,  Eris,"  the  vicar  replied,  a  broad  smile
spreading  across  his  face,  to the discomfort  of  his  fellow
jurors, "I think that's plain enough.
 "If  I understand that correctly,  then a waiving  agreement  is
only valid if both parties freely give fully informed consent  to
it," Sessions said, inquiringly, as he turned to his companions.
 Hesitantly, Dot replied, "I think you're right, Reverend."
 Colin  Simoney's face brightened,  "I'm almost certain that  you
are,"  he  cried,  heartily clapping Sessions on  the  back.  "In
fact,"  he  went  on,  "I'd  suggest that  Dowes  behaved  in  an
unethical manner.  The waiving agreement should have had a  clear
statement of risks - both actual and potential - inherent in  the
experiments.  There  were no obvious warnings - just the  waiving
agreement itself. And that's not enough!
 "Davey boy!" Simoney exclaimed,  happily, "I think you've nailed
the bastard!"
 Sessions  looked a little confused at  Sessions's  reaction,  "I
thought that you thought Dowes was innocent of all  wrong-doing,"
he said, bemused.
 "Not  at  all,  Davey  boy!  Not at  all!"  the  young  particle
physicist  replied,  "I thought she behaved unethically - I  just
couldn't see that she'd behaved illegally as well.  An  unethical
scientist," he went on,  more gravely,  "Reflects on us all,  you
see.
 "Science  does not support an ethical system per se,  and so  we
scientists  ourselves  have  to make sure that  we  behave  in  a
particularly  ethical manner.  We have to be our own watchdogs  -
because  we don't have the built-in ethical certainties that  you
religious types do."
 "I..." Sessions looked, and felt, moved by the scientists words.
"I didn't understand," he said,  after some hesitation, "I didn't
know. I'm sorry. I misjudged you."
 Those words, said haltingly but obviously honestly meant, melted
some  of  the  ice between the  priest  and  the  scientist.  And
Sessions  barely  noticed that Colin had called him  'Davey  boy'
again.

                              *****

 "What the Hell's going on,  Absolaam?" demanded Deborah  Greene,
fury  burning  in her eyes - though it vied for  prominence  with
honest curiosity.
 The  three  - Wye and the Greenes -  were,  once  more,  in  the
cabinet room. Graham and the Dictator had been discussing the new
space  hotel,  Phoenix,  when  Deborah had stormed  in  with  her
questions.
 Wye  waited  until soothing noises from her husband  had  calmed
Deborah down somewhat before he asked, genuinely puzzled, "What's
going on with what, Deborah?"
 "Don't  give me any bullshit,  Absolaam," came the  reply,  "I'm
talking  about  the priest trial.  What do you think  you're  you
doing?" The 'priest trial' was,  of course,  the trial which  had
the Reverend David Sessions on the (potential) jury.
 Wye  waited  a  while,  grinning annoyingly -  by  the  time  he
answered,  Deborah was opening her mouth to scream at him.  Which
was the moment he had been waiting for,  so he  asked,  smoothly,
"What makes you think I'm doing anything?" All the while,  Graham
repeatedly looked from his wife to his Dictator, in the hope that
his wife's demands would be explained.
 Deborah spoke carefully,  slowly and  deliberately,  emphasising
every word: "Eris," she said, "Is being tampered with."
 A look of horror shot over Graham's face. He turned immediately:
"General," he asked, "Is this true?"
 Wye's grin broadened.  Then he replied,  "Yes, it's true enough,
Graham.  What  made you realise,  Deborah?  If you don't mind  my
asking," he added, disingenuously.
 For a moment,  Deborah was unable to answer,  so stunned was she
by the Dictator's immediate admission of guilt. Then: "I assisted
with  the  research  behind  the  VAS's  psychology  programming,
remember. I know what it's capable of, and what it isn't.
 "Earlier  this afternoon,  Eris voluntarily drew attention to  a
piece of evidence.  That is within its standard  programming,  in
general terms. Except that the statement it made was something of
non sequitur.  It was unrelated to the topic being discussed by
the jurors at that time.
 "In  effect,  Eris closed off the jury's line of  reasoning  and
opened  up  an entirely new branch of enquiry to  the  jury.  And
that,"  she  said,  heatedly,  "Is  most definitely  not  in  its
standard programming. It must have had the statement suggested to
it by an outside agency.
 "The  only  external agency normally involved  in  causing  such
leading  behaviour  on the part of Eris is  discussion  by  other
juries and potential juries involved in the same case.  But  none
of  the  others  had  considered the line  of  pursuit  Eris  was
advocating,  so the statement must have come from somewhere else.
You?" she asked Wye.
 Wye  shook  his head,  "No,  not me,  Deborah - Lao Tzi  is  the
culprit  here.  I  asked him to prompt that  particular  jury  by
occasionally giving them a jolt.  Evidently,  he wasn't as subtle
as I'd hoped," the Dictator said, smiling wryly.
 "But...But, Why, General?" asked an incredulous Graham.
 "Straightforward enough,  Graham," replied the General, wearily.
Wye  walked  over  the the window,  and began  staring  out  into
Downing  Street below.  Both Graham and Deborah were reminded  of
the day,  months earlier, when they had first heard of the Church
of Wye. "This jury is special.
 "You  know  that - I know that.  But why is it so  special?"  he
asked, turning to face Deborah, "Why?"
 "Because of the priest," she replied.
 Wye nodded, then turned to face full into the room, "Precisely."
For  several  moments,  there was silence.  Just  as  Graham  was
beginning to wonder if there was any more to come,  the  Dictator
went on, "Because of the priest," he repeated, then, "That damned
priest - left to his own devices - would simply vote 'guilty' and
move on."
  "But  they've ended up deciding on a  guilty  verdict  anyway,"
Deborah  said,  becoming annoyed and wishing that Absolaam  would
come to the point.  "So,  despite your 'guidance' the priest  has
succeeded in convincing the other jury members to vote with him -
rather than them changing his mind, he's changed theirs."
 "Not  at all," Wye said,  "The correct verdict in this case  was
guilty,  in  my  opinion." At the Greenes's  startled  looks,  he
continued,  "No,  I didn't think so at first. At first, I thought
that Dowes had behaved unethically, but not illegally.
 "Lao Tzi disagreed with me - he thought Dowes was guilty, on the
basis  that Basil was under what he perceived to be  an  economic
threat which drove him to consent to Dowes's agreement. I thought
- and still think - that Lao Tzi was wrong there."
 "So  do I,  Absolaam - Dowes couldn't reasonably be expected  to
know  about Basil's misperceptions.  Even if she did  know  about
them,  they  were Basil's business,  not Dowes's - and Dowes  was
under no responsibility to take them into account."
 Wye  was  nodding his agreement,  then:  "As to  Eris's  leading
statement  - the one you're referring to,  I assume,  is where  a
reference is made - for no apparent reason - which led Dot to ask
about  stress levels shown on the video records of Dowes's  lab?"
Deborah nodded. "I thought so.
 "In  that statement,  and a later one which was disguised  as  a
request for clarification,  Lao Tzi was interested in seeing what
the juror's would do with his theory - whether they would  accept
or reject it.  What happened,  of course,  was that they rejected
it.
 "For  myself,  I was interested in forcing the  Reverend  'Davey
Boy'  Sessions  to consider deeper issues than merely  his  god's
laws  - to force him to consider the implications of British  law
as  it  stands.  And  to accept - at least in  principle  -  that
British law works well.
 "As it turned out,  the Reverend Sessions surprised me.  He  not
only  saw that Dowes's behaviour was unethical,  he also  saw  in
what way it was illegal.  And I," Wye concluded,  "Agree with his
conclusions entirely.
 "But the important thing,  Deborah,  is that Sessions worked out
his approach by using the legal system as it stands.  He did  not
take  recourse  to the laws of his  personal  god.  Which  should
mean,"  Wye continued,  hopefully,  "That he will be thinking  in
terms of man-made laws when he approaches future cases.
 "He might even be willing to sacrifice one of his god's absolute
laws in favour of the man-made laws by the time he comes to  that
all-important third case."
 "I'm not sure, Absolaam," said Deborah, unconvinced, "I can't be
happy about fiddling with the jury for any reason - it stinks  of
corruption."
 Wye nodded,  gravely.  "I think you're right, Deborah," he said,
"Which is why I personally removed the backdoor into Eris as soon
as that trial was over with. The temptation would be too great to
interfere, and the line is way too difficult to draw."
 "So Eris can't be tampered with again, General?"
 "No,  Graham.  As it stands,  that VAS is self-modifying to  the
extent  that  its  database  of  reactions  and  information   is
constantly changing,  as it learns from different cases and  sets
of jurors. But it can't be directly tampered with anymore.
 "Oh," he continued, "By the way, there is a full video record of
both  Lao  Tzi's session with Eris during the trial  and  my  own
session  afterwards,  should you wish to take a look at  them  to
satisfy  yourselves  that there's no longer a way back  into  the
VAS."
 "I'm sure that won't be necessary, Absolaam."
 "I wish you would watch them in any case, Deborah," the Dictator
replied,  "If only to ensure that I didn't inadvertently fail  to
sever  all  of the direct terminal lines which could be  used  to
reprogram Eris."
 Deborah,  the  acknowledged computer expert amongst  the  three,
nodded her acquiescence and stepped over to a private Terminal to
study the video records.
 "Incoming  message,  Sol," came a voice from the loudspeaker  in
the ceiling.
 "Hagbard,  put it on the main Terminal. Thanks, Hagbard," sighed
Wye.
 "Anytime, Sol," the VAS chirped.
 Over at the main Network Terminal in the cabinet room,  an image
appeared.  The  name and location of the sender was given in  the
information line at the base of the screen. Wye barely glanced at
the line,  though - he recognised the face, and already knew that
the caller was in orbit.
 "Hi,  Gerry," the Dictator said, facing into the pickup, "How is
everything?"
 The  General's  signal travelled to his caller at the  speed  of
light.  However,  that caller was orbiting roughly three  hundred
and twenty five thousand kilometres - two hundred thousand  miles
- from the earth's surface, and light travels at a sluggish three
hundred  million  metres per second.  So it was that  it  took  a
little over a second for Wye's message to reach his  caller,  and
the  same  length of time for Gerald's reply to make it  back  to
Earth.
 Slightly more than two seconds later,  then,  Gerald's image  on
the  Terminal  responded,  "Fine,  Dictator," he  said,  "I  just
thought you'd like to see the progress so far.  I'll just  swivel
the  pickup  here,"  his hands vanished from view  as  he  leaned
forward  to grasp the sides of the video pickup in front of  him.
The image panned across to show a window.
 Through  the  window,   Wye  saw  a  delicate-looking   skeletal
framework of steel girders,  held in position - for the moment  -
by  barely-visible wires,  which glinted in the raw  sunlight  as
they  moved.  The  whole affair was spinning slowly  against  the
background of piercingly-bright stars as he stared.  In fact, Wye
noticed,  the stars themselves appeared to be rotating also -  he
put this down,  quite correctly,  to the spin of the craft  which
housed the video pickup itself.
 In fact,  if the long axis of the cylinder of the temporary base
hadn't been pointing directly at the framework, the newly-started
Phoenix  space  hotel would be visible only  briefly,  every  few
seconds,  as it span in and out of the line of sight of the video
pickup.
 The long axis, the engineers who worked on Phoenix insisted, had
to  point at the space hotel,  in order to assist in docking  the
construction  workers's  jet-assisted  EVA  suits  and  delicate-
looking  vehicles as they passed backwards and  forwards  between
the temporary quarters and the spidery building they were working
on.
 Wye  had  more than a  sneaking  suspicion,  however,  that  the
orientation  of those quarters had more than a little to do  with
the  breath-taking view afforded through the long-axis windows  -
straight  ahead  was the slowly-growing edifice of  the  Phoenix,
while fixed behind it could be seen the Earth in all the glory of
its whites, blues, browns and greens.
 As  they  watched through the video-link,  Wye  and  Graham  saw
Central  America  wander  past on the Earth  below  the  orbiting
living  quarters - they saw the Mexico-Guatemala  border  starkly
outlined.  The  results of the Mexican rain forest  deforestation
programme  could be seen,  the man-made boundary between the  two
countries was vividly carved onto the surface of the  Earth,  and
clearly visible from space.
 After a while,  giving the two viewers on Earth time to take  in
the spectacular view,  Gerald said,  "The Phoenix is coming along
very nicely, Dictator, as you can see."
 Wye's  mouth  was slightly dry after taking in  this  particular
view,  but he managed to say,  with a grin, "Damnit, Gerry, can't
you call me 'Sol'? How's your own task doing?" he added.
 That damned two-second delay wasn't too bad,  now that they  had
the view to look at.  Eventually,  though,  Gerald replied,  "I'm
doing fine too,  Sol.  I've been over the framework as it stands,
and  there've  been  very few changes needed -  though  the  low-
gravity  swimming pool will have to be moved quite a ways on  the
blueprints to allow more room for the free-fall flying arena."
 Gerald's task, as science-fiction consultant to the project, was
to transfer entertainments and sports dreamt up by sci-fi authors
into  actuality  in the Phoenix.  Thus,  he had worked  with  the
architects  to  design various halls and equipment  for  reduced-
gravity  and free-fall activities,  mostly based on the ideas  of
long-dead writers.
 In theory,  his job could have been performed entirely from  the
surface of the Earth.  Theory had been stretched, however, on the
ostensible basis that he should journey up into orbit to  double-
check  locations in situ before the builders were committed to  a
specific  layout,  and maybe dream up new ideas when he felt  the
effects of free-fall for himself.
 In actual fact, the trip into orbit was regarded by everybody as
a perk of the job for Gerald - nobody even pretended to fall  for
his  spurious  'reasoning' in requesting the  trip.  Wye  himself
actually burst out laughing when he'd heard that the  philosopher
had shed three stone of fat, and built up almost a stone of solid
muscle,  in  readiness for the hoped-for journey into orbit -  he
hadn't the heart to refuse him, and so Gerald went on the trip of
his dreams into space.
 "By the way,  Gerry," Wye said, before signing off, "Your wife's
first case has just finished,  so you can give Dot a ring anytime
before tomorrow morning, when the second one starts."
 "Thanks,  Sol - I think.  See you!" came the delayed reply,  two
seconds later, before the screen went blank.
 Fifteen minutes later,  Wye accepted a second call from  Gerald.
"Sol," the philosophy said, "I've had an idea..."

Chapter Thirty Three

          "The important thing is never to stop questioning."
                                                --Albert Einstein


 "My daddy says the Dictator is a bad man."
 The speaker, Jamie, was a four year old boy - small, though tall
for  his  age,  and slim,  his head covered with a  profusion  of
tightly-curled, blonde hair. His face was serious, though. He was
disturbed  by the subject,  as he continued,  "My daddy says  the
Dictator  killed lots and lots and lots of people who  never  did
him any harm." Jamie was on the edge of tears,  "But you say  the
Dictator is a good man. Are you fibbing?"
 The  room  was quiet,  for once,  as their teacher  turned  over
possible answers.  Nominally,  he was supposed to be teaching the
young children how to find their way around the Network computers
- how to find answers to difficult questions,  and how to  obtain
those  answers in terms that they could  understand,  bearing  in
mind  that they'd only recently learned how to  read,  write  and
type.
 Mr  Harford,  however,  was  one of the new  breed  of  teachers
trained by Wye's various educational programmes.  Only two  years
ago  (was it only two years?),  Jim Harford had been living as  a
homeless  beggar  on  the  streets of  Brighton  -  some  of  his
colleagues,  notably  those who avowedly specialised in  teaching
the politics of censorship,  had spent that period of their lives
as rent boys and teenage-girl prostitutes.
 Others  had been addicted to some narcotic or other  -  usually,
heroin - and many who taught the youngsters about the dangers and
difficulties of addiction still were,  unwillingly,  addicted  to
such substances. The difference being that the ready availability
of those narcotics now enabled them to function and contribute to
society's  well-being,   rather  than  spending  all  their  time
thinking  about where the next fix was coming  from.  Or  pushing
drugs, selling their body or stealing to feed their habit.
 Jim Harford was used,  by now,  to handling difficult  questions
from  his  students,  of  whatever age.  And  he  was  no  longer
surprised  when those questions appeared to be irrelevant to  the
ostensible subject of his lessons.
 After all,  his trainer had explained,  artificial divisions  in
human knowledge are just that - artificial.  More important  than
sticking  to a specific syllabus was encouraging enquiring  minds
to ask difficult and awkward questions. That was what was crucial
- not simply forcing information into the young brains.
 When all was said and done,  specific knowledge could be  picked
up from the Network at a moment's notice - far more important was
the attitude which produced people who were interested enough  to
bother asking the questions in the first place.
 While Mr Harford was turning possible replies over in his  mind,
the  fourteen  students  in his class  were  starting  to  become
restless.  One or two were sniggering and one older boy - a  five
year  old  named  Kevin - began taunting  Jamie,  calling  him  a
"daddy's  boy"  and a "cry baby." Harford knew he had  to  answer
Jamie, and quickly, but first he turned to face the older boy:
 "Kevin," Harford said,  "Jamie's question is a very good one. It
shows that he's been thinking for himself." Thinking for yourself
was a great compliment, at least in Jim Harford's class, and such
compliments were never given out lightly.
 Kevin's face froze and he turned to Jamie with a look of respect
in his eyes. He well remembered the last time he had been praised
for  thinking  for himself - that had been when  he'd  asked  all
those  questions about the new space hotel.  The whole class  had
spent a whole week finding out the answers to Kevin's  questions,
and  he  -  Kevin - had been in charge  of  directing  the  whole
project.
 When  they  had put on that month's big presentation  for  their
parents  and teachers,  it had been Kevin who'd been wearing  the
white  coat  with  the gold cap - it had all  been  down  to  his
questions,  and  everybody knew it.  He smiled,  happily,  as  he
recalled the proud look on his parents's faces as they took their
VIP seats at the presentation.
 And  now Jamie had been thinking for himself,  Mr Harford  said,
and Kevin knew what that meant.  Everybody knew what that  meant.
The whole class would try to answer his questions and they  would
end up putting together a presentation.  And Jamie would get  the
credit this time,  and Jamie's parents would sit in the VIP seat,
and  Jamie would wear the gold-trimmed white  coat,  and  Jamie's
parents would be the proudest in the room.
 For a moment, Kevin was jealous. Only a moment, though - he knew
that his turn would come again before too long.  Everybody in the
class  had  their own questions - and everybody  would  direct  a
presentation, eventually.
 Kevin's  first presentation had given him a new MoneyCard -  his
old MoneyCard had been a child's bright yellow, just like Jamie's
was now, but his new one was a student's bright red. He was proud
of  having a red MoneyCard,  and magnanimously willing  to  grant
that Jamie, too, would get one before long. Jealously vanished at
the thought that he,  Kevin,  only needed four more presentations
before he received a blue MoneyCard.
 "Now,  Jamie," the teacher was saying, "You asked if I have been
fibbing about the Dictator being a good man, is that right?"
 Jamie,  much  cheered up by being congratulated on thinking  for
himself, happily nodded his agreement.
 "Okay,  people," Harford addressed the rest of the  class,  "How
can we find out whether the Dictator is a good man or a bad man -
or maybe if he's neither one,  but just a man?" He was pleased to
see  the sea of hands,  but there was no doubt about who  was  to
answer  the  question  -  the instant  that  Jamie's  hand  rose,
hesitantly  but happily,  into the air,  everybody  else  lowered
their own.  This was Jamie's project - his question, his project.
Everybody knew that.
 "Yes, Jamie?"
 "Well, Mister Harford," the four year old man replied, "We could
find out why my daddy thinks the Dictator is a bad man,  and  why
you  think  the  Dictator is a good man."  Seeing  his  teacher's
encouraging nods,  he went on,  more confidently,  "Then we could
check out the facts behind the reasons."
 Jim Harford smiled, broadly. "Wonderful idea, Jamie. Shall we do
that, people?" There was no need to call for a vote - not really.
After all,  and by unspoken consent, this was Jamie's project and
everybody would help just as they would expect everybody else  to
help when it was their own project.  Harford called for a vote in
any  case,  and the sea of hands and calls of "Yes" that  greeted
his  request  was  reminder enough of why he chose  to  remain  a
teacher in Wye's Britain.

                              *****

 "...and I love you too,  dear." Dot closed the connection on the
Terminal before leaving the privacy of her room and returning  to
the jury room, where she found her four fellow jurors waiting for
her.
 "Sorry I kept you waiting, my husband called," she said, sitting
down, "Now, what's the next case then?" she asked.
 "We haven't asked yet,  Dot," replied Colin Simoney,  brushing a
lick of hair away from his eyes.  He raised his eyes and his tone
of voice changed slightly, "Eris, next case?"
 "Hello again,  Colin," replied the VAS,  "Your second trial case
involves  an  allegation  of an abuse  of  a  monopoly  position:
specifically, the Divine water-purification company is accused of
profiteering."
 "Eris," said Dot,  "Outline the facts as presented by each side,
please."
 "Certainly,  Dot.  The  accuser,  Ms Harriet Wood,  claims  that
Divine's  prices for purified water are exorbitant.  The  company
denies this."
 "Eris, what are the prices?"
 "The  Divine  company's  charges  are  now  displayed  on   your
Terminal,  Reverend  Sessions,  along with the charges levied  by
other  water  companies.   Also  shown  is  the  cost  of   water
purification as claimed by each side in the dispute."
 The Reverend Sessions whistled,  softly, through his teeth. "Are
these figures accurate, Eris?" he asked, incredulously.
 "Which ones, Reverend Sessions?"
 "Those given by Ms Wood,  Eris.  Oh, and, Eris," he added, as an
afterthought,  "Please  call me 'David' from now on." His  fellow
jurors looked away from the figures on the screen for a moment in
surprise. Colin Simoney clapped Sessions on the shoulder heartily
as Sessions explained,  "I just thought...Well...A more  friendly
atmosphere..?"
 "Fine, Davey. Fine," smiled Simoney.
 "All  figures  on the screen are  completely  accurate,  David,"
replied  the VAS - and did Reverend Sessions detect a touch  more
warmth in its voice? Surely not - that must be the product of his
imagination.  Too  much anthropomorphising,  that was  all.  "The
figures  on the cost of water purification are an average of  the
costs given by companies across the country,  weighted  according
to the quality of the water in that area."
 "And  the  water  quality  figures  are  supplied  by..?"  asked
Simoney, leadingly.
 Eris  confirmed that the water quality figures used  were  those
provided  by  government-supervised  tests  made  by  the   water
companies themselves.
 "In that case," the young priest went on,  anxious now to change
back to the original subject, "The case seems clear-cut enough to
me.  From  these  figures,"  he waved in  the  direction  of  the
Terminal  screen,  "The Divine company is making a fifty  percent
profit.
 "Even  allowing for maintenance and enhancement of  the  ancient
network of sewers, the prices they're charging are far too high."
 The general consensus of the jury was that Sessions was correct.
The only problem now, as Simoney put it, was "What the fuck do we
do about it?"
 "I'm   not  happy  about  artificially  restricting  the   legal
activities  of  a private company,"  interjected  Gordon  Bowman,
suddenly.  Questioning looks from the other four urged him on, "I
mean,  we  might well disapprove of this abuse of  monopoly,  but
it's  not  actually illegal is it?" For the last  two  words,  he
raised his voice to address the computer.
 "No,  Gordon," came Eris's response,  "Abuse of monopoly in this
fashion is not illegal."
 "Then  why  did it come to trial,  Eris?"  asked  Dot,  somewhat
mystified.
 "Simply because Ms Wood claimed that it was  illegal,  Dot.  And
decisions  as to the legality or otherwise of actions have to  be
decided upon by a jury of humans - not by a computing system."
 "Hold on a second," Bowman said,  "What Divine's doing is legal.
Fine,  but I don't think any of us approves of this kind of abuse
of a monopoly position?" One glance about the table confirmed him
in his supposition.
 "So,  the question remains," Colin Simoney summed up,  "What the
fuck can we do about it?"
 "We  could  always break the  monopoly."  The  speaker,  talking
hesitantly and softly, was the Reverend Sessions.
 There  was  a stunned silence for a short while  before  Simoney
asked, "What did you say, Davey?"
 "I said 'we could always break the monopoly' But it's probably a
stupid idea," he added, apologetically.
 "Not  at  all,  Davey boy!  Not at all!"  Simoney  was  beaming,
"You've  come through again,  Davey.  I don't know what  we'd  do
without you!" He clapped the priest on the back  again,  happily,
to  the  bewilderment of the remainder  of  the  jury.  Including
Sessions himself.
 "Eris," Simoney said,  his voice inflecting just so,  "Is a jury
authorised to provide government loans?"
 "Under some circumstances,  Colin," came the reply,  "A jury can
recommend  a  payment or the granting of a loan  for  a  specific
purpose. The final decision lies with the Dictator, however," the
VAS added.
 "Damned Dictator!" spat Sessions, under his breath.
 Simoney  stared  at  Sessions for a  moment.  The  other  jurors
wondered why Colin's face was wearing an incredulous expression -
they hadn't heard the priest's comment. Simoney said, quietly, to
David, "I'd like to have a chat with you about that later, David.
If you don't mind."
 Sessions, surprised, found himself replying, "Okay, Colin," just
as softly.
 Then Colin Simoney continued,  louder,  to the VAS,  "Eris,"  he
said,  "How  much  would it cost to set up a  water  purification
company in competition with Divine?" The computer gave a  figure,
then  Colin went on,  "Okay,  now calculate the charges for  that
company - allowing for repayment of the loan over,  say, a period
of ten years."
 The figures flashed on the Terminal.  They were only  marginally
lower than Divine's charges,  so Simoney swore softly, then said,
"Eris, recalculate the charges allowing for repayment over twenty
years."
 This time,  the figures showed prices which would allow the loan
to be repaid while keeping charges so low that Divine would  find
it very difficult to compete. Simoney looked around at his fellow
jurors.
 "Very  impressive,  Colin," said Dot,  after a while,  "Are  you
suggesting that we set up such a company ourselves?"
 Simoney shook his head,  causing his mop of brown hair to bounce
slightly,  "Not at all,  Dot," he explained, "I'm suggesting that
we  offer  this  loan  to  Ms Wood to allow  her  to  set  up  in
competition with Divine.  Or, if she refuses, to anybody else who
wishes  to do so.  Since the new company would be  starting  from
scratch,  with a government loan,  its initial agreement with its
customers  could  include  an insistence  that  its  profits  are
limited  to  a specific percentage of income - any excess  to  be
used to reduce charges in the following year."
 "Masterly," laughed Sessions,  clapping.  The others soon joined
in as it sank in.
 The  Sessions-Simoney idea (Sessions wanted it to be called  the
'Simoney idea,' but his objections were overruled by  Colin,  who
insisted  that  the idea was as much the priest's as it  was  the
scientist's)  was  transmitted,  via Eris,  to the  other  juries
dealing  with the case,  and was adopted.  Eris also  placed  the
strategy  into its growing database of ways of handling  specific
situations,  ready  to  suggest its application in  future  cases
dealing with monopoly situations.

                              *****

 "Fuck!" shouted Gerald, as he saw the cable snap. 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.