Skip to main content
© Erik 'ES of TEX' Simon, 1989

 "You don't consider age in the face of cleavage."
                                                   Jerry Seinfeld


                       'FAMOUS' LAST WORDS
                     by a variety of people

 So this is,  indeed, the last issue of ST NEWS. I asked a couple
of  people  if perhaps they'd feel inclined to write down  a  few
words (some of them wrote rather a few more) in commemoration  of
the  departing  magazine.  Below  you  can  read  the  reactions,
including a few quite heart-warming ones.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 I've been reading ST NEWS for two years now.  I must say that  I
really enjoy it,  especially the music chapters. I'm  a hard rock
freak  too you see.  In fact I've bought some CDs  after  reading
their reviews. It will be a black day for the Atari community the
day that the last version is uploaded.
 CU around.
                                                 Martin Byttebier

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 Well,  I  haven't read ST NEWS issues in three years (and  those
that  I  read were generally from <= 1990).  The one  issue  that
contained  the  assembly language course was nice  and  I  really
enjoyed  Stefan's  article  on programming  rasters  (although  I
didn't do that myself). ST NEWS had some interesting book reviews
too.  I stopped reading ST NEWS because the latest issues that  I
tested didn't like either "MiNT" or "KaosTOS"...
                                                    Eero Tamminen

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 ST NEWS!  Without a doubt the single most bright and encouraging
thing I remember about the thriving days of the ST.
 Back  then I remember reading the amazing,  and still  legendary
issue  25 (Volume 4 Issue 4).   With the amazing tunes  from  the
likes  of  Martin  Galway & the  great  "Knucklebusters"  (thanks
Jochen!).  I was devastated when my STe refused to load it when I
upgraded :-)
 Richard  and  Stephan made a mark on my life that I  will  never
forget.  I  will remember the years back then when I  strived  to
create the best demo in "STOS" I ever could (eventually  released
on  the "Cunning Demos" under the name TK of the  Dentrassi).   I
also  enjoyed doing my articles in a few  "Maggie"  issues.   Now
look at me!  I now play a major part in the support of the newest
programs coming into the UK, and with my work at System Solutions
I  get  to  be at the top of the Atari branch until  one  day  it
finally  falls off (which ATM doesn't seem to be in the too  near
future).
 I *MUST* get a complete copy of all the disk mags for the  Atari
and put them on a CD.   Anyone want to help me with this?  I will
supply  a free CD to anyone who can supply me with  the  complete
disk sets of ST NEWS and/or "Maggie".
 All my regards, and thanks for all the good times.
                                                        Rob Perry
                   A.K.A. - Sales Supervisor for System Solutions
                                            A.K.A. - TK Dentrassi

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 How ST NEWS changed my life.
 This might sound a bit far fetched,  but ST NEWS played a  great
role in getting me where I am today.  In 1989,  my computer  days
seemed to go more and more towards playing games,  watching demos
and,  well,  after learning myself assembler,  I did make a  tiny
demo.  Nothing  fancy,  though,  and  I had a great  respect  for
superior  groups  such as the Exceptions,  creators of  the  well
known "B.I.G. demo".
 Socially, I must admit, I was a loser.
 At  this time,  I started going to high  school.  Usually,  this
would mean that I would start concentrating more about school and
meeting  new  friends,  but several factors at this  point  would
change the course I took. I had found "ST Klubben", the Norwegian
clone of ST NEWS. This would, of course, then lead me to ST NEWS.
The Atari scene in Norway started thriving in activity, and I was
in the middle of it.  The inspiring disk magazine format, as well
as,  actually,  my German teacher,  got me into "writing mode". I
started  writing  short stories and poetry.  I  continued  making
demos  and some times applications of different sorts.   I and  a
handful of friends even made home videos as a response to the  ST
NEWS
 home videos.  In short,  ST NEWS inspired me into leading  a
very creative life.
 I  took this creativity with me through high  school,  where  it
kept me alive through times of heartbreaking crushes.  And I took
it  with  me  through  college,  where I  soon  would  become  an
important  contribution and was given a lot  of  confidence.  And
even before I was finished at the college,  I started working  at
the public library and city hall,  where they also appreciated my
contributions.  This was a great contrast to the shy person I was
in '89.  In fact,  the inspirational factor ST NEWS had given  me
had not only turned me into an active writer,  computer  engineer
and  co-editor and programmer of the Atari disk magazine  "Scriba
Communis Responsi", but it had turned a loser into a winner.
 The  only  problem  I seemed to have at that  time  was  that  I
couldn't  find a FULL job in Norway.  It didn't really bother  me
until I met my Love of my Life,  Bethani, from the USA. I started
hunting  for  jobs around the world,  especially in  the  US.  It
wasn't until now that I got to know exactly how much ST NEWS  had
done for me. The creativity beyond school activities that ST NEWS
had driven me to do,  was a major factor when considered for jobs
in  the  US.  I received 6 job offers within 4 days from  the  US
through  the Internet.  Unfortunately,  nobody wanted to  do  the
paperwork to get me a green card.  Eventually, I was contacted by
O'Reilly  and Associates,  publisher of great UNIX  and  Internet
books.  The  vice-president was going to Holland for an  Internet
conference,  and  wanted to see me for an interview.  I  actually
stayed  in Holland for a week,  spending some time with  Richard.
;^)   Several interviews later,  they finally offered me  a  job.
Unfortunately,  the  deal was a year as  system-administrator  in
Germany  with  no  guarantees  for  them  taking  me  to  the  US
afterwards.  I might stay in Germany,  or decide to move back  to
Norway afterwards.  With Bethani being an American citizens, that
only made our situation worse, so I told them no.
 Not too long after,  Stefan,  whom I had known from ST NEWS  and
now was a programmer at Gray Matter in Canada, was looking around
for  programmers  from the old Atari scene  because  Gray  Matter
needed more programmers. I eagerly raised my hand, and shortly, I
had an interview with Chris Gray,  author of the well known  game
"Boulderdash" and owner of Gray Matter.  Once again,  it was  all
the  Atari stuff I had done that was of interest,  and  within  a
couple of days,  I had a job offer. I accepted it. Four months of
paperwork later, I was flying to Toronto, Canada, where I'd start
a new life and a family.
 As I'm writing this,  Bethani has moved in with me.  We're quite
happy together,  and by the time this article is published, we'll
be married.  And even though ST NEWS hasn't been the only  factor
to  make  my life so enjoyable,  it definitely has  been  a  very
important one.
 Thank you, ST NEWS. Thank you, Richard. Thank you, Stefan.
                                          Gard Eggesbø Abrahamsen

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 ST  NEWS  is/was an 'institution'.  It has always been  a  great
source of news,  reviews,  interviews, adventure solutions, games
cheats,  viruses news, programming tutorials and gossip about the
Atari scene.  When we started up "STuffed" disk mag in  1989,  ST
NEWS
  had released its 'final' issue.  We aimed to fill  the  gap
left by their departure.  We lasted for just nine issues. Were we
really  that bad!  ST NEWS returned with the 'undead' issues  and
have now reached issue 41!  ST NEWS has never been  conventional,
looking at such things as the latest CDs,  films,  videos and pop
concerts  as  well  as all the Atari  related  features,  and  of
course there was the chronicle of Richard's numerous girlfriends,
who  seem to have outnumbered the issues of  ST NEWS!  (two  real
ones, actually, and two semi-ones and two or three crushes before
summer of 1989, ED.)
 I haven't always agreed with the opinions expressed in ST  NEWS,
but that's free speech for you! What I have done is enjoy reading
each issue regardless. Richard and Stefan before him (and Richard
before  him!) made an enormous contribution to the ST scene  over
the  years and it's hard to imagine life without  ST  NEWS.  Hey,
this is sounding like an epitaph. It the mag that's dead, not the
guy himself!  Seriously though, the fact that ST NEWS was pure PD
and spread by everyone has meant that it was enjoyed by thousands
of users worldwide.
 OK,  I've said my piece so I'll stop prattling on! All I want to
say (no,  I'm not finished yet!) is thanks a lot  Richard.  We'll
all miss ST NEWS (unless it goes 'undead' again!). Ten years is a
long time and the ST NEWS legacy is an impressive achievement.
 All the best for the future.
                                       Steve Delaney (Floppyshop)

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 I remember looking with something akin to wonder when I saw  the
first of many issues our local Atari ST users group received.  If
memory serves (and it has been,  after all, nearly a decade ago!)
there was a monochrome demo menu at the BOTTOM of the screen, and
a  number of graphics demos that were quite  marvelous.   At  the
time I only had a color monitor, but I bought my first monochrome
monitor shortly thereafter simply to be able to run the program.
 Of course, many things have happened since then.  I was the disk
librarian for our local user group (called MAST),  and I can tell
you  that every single issue of ST NEWS we could get hold of  was
there.  I remember sending IRC coupons across the Atlantic to get
the older issues (and, later, the new ones too...).
 MAST is gone now, disbanded back in 1993 due to small attendance
(basically  a  handful of technical folk who  also  attended  our
monthly programmers' meeting).   I got married back in 1989  (and
there  is  even  a mention of it in a past  issue,  since  I  was
corresponding at the time).
 My  Atari  ST was sold back in EARLY 1994.   I've been  using  a
"Windows"-based system ever since.   Somehow,  the demos and  the
disk  magazines that I managed to find for the PC were  never  as
good, nor as clever as the ST-based ones.
 All  things must pass,  and I know that Richard and all  of  the
other  people who have been associated with the ST NEWS disk  are
moving  (and have moved) on to other projects,  other  lives.   I
have  missed the disk since my ST went away.   The memories  will
stick around,  though,  and I'll see familiar names pop up  under
other endeavors.
 Fiat Lux.
               David Paschal-Zimbel (better known as David Meile)

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 So ST NEWS has its final issue?  This is a  sad day,  I remember
"ST Enthusiasts Newsletter" dying and thinking to myself,   "Damm
I  wish  I  had contributed." ST NEWS  is  the  longest  standing
diskmag  I can think of,  there is no  other  similar,  "Maggie",
"DBA" and all the other "big boys" and indeed all other  diskmags
have their own unique  viewpoints,  but I cannot see ST NEWS ever
being replaced, but for those of us who have enjoyed the diskzine
and  are hanging on to our Ataris,  we will allways remember  the
Name, ST NEWS.
                   Tony Greenwood (founder of "STOSSER" diskzine)

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 Erm,  yes,  I have to admit that the idea to write some sort  of
swan-song article for ST NEWS came some time ago.  An true to  my
nature,  I  promptly started to write it about 4 days before  the
deadline. Typical.
 What is my connection with ST NEWS? What spiritual bonding did I
acquire  first  reading  and then writing for  one  of  the  most
infamous  diskette-magazines  in  the  world?  Why  did  I  begin
drinking  Plantiac?   And  most  importantly,  who  am  I?  These
questions,  and more, will probably be addressed in this piece of
prose. Or maybe they won't. We'll see.
 Last things first:  Who am I. Old-timers should remember me. TNS
of  QX and AE.  The Nutty Snake of The Quartermass Xperiment  and
Aenigmatica.  Or,  more recently,  AC.  Alex Crouzen. (you decide
which is the funniest)
 What  did I do to deserve the honour of writing  this  obituary.
For  with the passing of ST NEWS,  surely an era hath come to  an
end.  Yay verily!  Erm..sorry.  As I said,  what did I do?  Well,
that's a long story......
 Which,  if you pester me long enough, I will tell you all about.
But for now,  let's suffice with saying that it began a long time
ago, and lasted about 7 years. Some people from that time I still
know  and  still count among my friends.  Others I  (sadly)  lost
contact with but hope to see once more in the future.
 Some  of  the  most memorable moments  came  from  having  large
amounts of people (who coincidentally all knew each other) gather
in the most exotic places (A beautiful place by the sea,  a small
castle,  my home,  etc...) and put themselves under the influence
of lots of drink, food and monitor radiation.
 I  could start listing all the people I met,  spoke and saw  get
drunk  here,  but that would cost me both my sanity and  my  job.
(but since I will lose my job in 16 days anyway....)
 No,  what's  more  important is what my impression was  of  this
period in time. I met the editor(s) of ST NEWS through my buddies
of  Galtan 6 and somehow I made an impression on them (my  memory
abandons me at this point. It must have been somewhere at a messe
in Duesseldorf, or maybe it was in Marseille....)
 They asked me to write some stuff and one of my first pieces was
the introductory novella for "Populous 2" (I think....*sigh*  why
don't we have a network version of ST NEWS here at my job....)
 I  do  still  know  that I used to  read  ALL  texts  that  were
published in ST NEWS.  Stay up late and get a headache.  I didn't
mind.  Finding all the hidden texts and reading whole  scrollines
was my forte.
 I  also immensely enjoyed reading all the travelogues about  the
pilgrimages to England,  Norway etc. I must admit I have tried to
imitate  those articles,  but without such fantastic journeys  to
make I couldn't hope to do the same.
 My  'big'  break  was "Brainwalk".  This piece  of  fiction  was
inspired by the books of William Gibson.  It related the story of
a  cyber-jockey who was trapped in an artificial  universe.  Neat
stuff.
 And  then  there  was the real-time article of  the  STNICCC  (I
believe  it was pronounced 'Saint Nicccc') in which such  amazing
discoveries were made like: 'a 1-litre bottle of coke fits into a
normal  jeans-trouser pocket...' and 'Writing a 3.5K demo is  NOT
easy...except for mine'
 Yes, those were the days. Duesseldorf, Marseille, Oss, Voorburg.
I must admit I sometimes miss those carefree days.  I mean, right
now, I'm sitting behind a (yech!) Pentium, typing this article in
"Word",   while  I  should  be  programming  some  complicated  C
application.  Valuable  man-hours are lost wallowing  in  ancient
memories.  But  then  again,  anything is better than  having  to
dissect my 'spaghetti-code' and find where the problem lies.
 I  am known to be a incorrigable joker,  but I will put  all  my
jokes aside when I say this:
 ST NEWS was - and will be!  - a phenomenon. All good things come
to an end, and I am proud to have been a part of it. I salute all
of those who have written, drawn or composed for it.
                       Alex Crouzen, a.k.a. The Nutty Snake of QX

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 So,  this  is  the  last issue of ST NEWS.  "Sad  but  True"  as
Metallica used to say.  I remember the old times when  ES,  -me-,
6719,   Mad  Max  (Hippie  Nippel)  and  myself  visited  Richard
Karsmakers,  Stefan  Posthuma and Frank Lemmen in  (erm,  was  it
Eindhoven) (it was,  ED.) in the Netherlands.  That was cool.  It
was  the weekend when we had the best Lasagne and  we  discovered
the spurious interrupt on the ST.  Man, these good ol' times will
never  come back again.  Or the,  as we Germans  say,  megageile,
STNICCC (ST NEWS International Christmas Coding Convention).  The
whole Atari Scene at one party. Michael Bittner did the best work
in his coding-career:  writing a shoot-em-up in 3.5kb.  Same  did
Mad Max when he developed a synth for this game that needed  only
some 100 bytes (complete with code and data).  All this  couldn't
have been possible without ST NEWS,  the best mag Atari has  ever
seen.
 Electronically yours,
                                              Michael (Daryl/TEX)

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 Let's face it:  we've never been hip.  Being part of a community
of  computer geeks isn't considered to be cool in any way by  the
rest of the world. But what the heck. This was OUR scene. We were
(and are still somehow) weirdos,  we socialized with weirdos  and
made  friends with some of them.  But!  We were (and  are  still,
hopefully)  creative,  we were idealistic and we were  dedicated.
These are attributes that can't be said of quite a lot of  "cool"
activities.  ST  NEWS was to us what underground comics  such  as
R. Crumb's or Gilbert Shelton's were to the counterculture of the
late  60s/early 70s.  Of course neither we nor ST NEWS  have  had
this kind of cultural impact,  but we had fun doing those  stupid
demos  and  we  had fun reading about them and  a  lot  of  other
hilarious stuff.  So seeing ST NEWS going down gives me the  same
sad feeling as any kind of freaky comic,  magazine or pulp series
which was part of my youth does.  On the other hand, this strikes
me  as the announcement of "Simply Red's very,  very,  very  last
Tour".  Knowing  Richard's  passion for  necromancy,  I  wouldn't
wonder  if some "Beyond the Grave",  "Final Revenge" or  whatever
issues would appear. Hopefully, this is just another trick to get
some article submissions out of people.  It worked,  Richard.  Go
on.
                                     Erik Simon, a.k.a. ES of TEX

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 My serious involvement in the Atari scene began in 1989,  a year
after  I  had bought my first ST,  when I started an  Atari  mail
order company in Denmark,  called CFN-DATA.  I wasn't out to make
money.  I wanted to supply the Danish ST users with products that
were hard to get elsewhere, at reasonable prices, and I wanted to
keep it at hobby level.
 Looking back, I see that I managed to satisfy these ideas. I did
supply lots of weird software and hardware that was difficult  to
get hold of,  I managed to maintain reasonable prices, I was wise
enough  to keep it at hobby level and I certainly never made  any
money!
 What I didn't expect back in 1989, was that CFN-DATA would exist
for  6  years and that I would become as involved  in  the  whole
Atari "community" as I did.
 I started out selling games,  but was eventually able to  supply
all  sorts  of software and light hardware.  I went  through  the
Atari "depression" in 1991-92,  ran a PD library and subscription
service for a year,  regained my faith in Atari,  as we all  did,
when  the  Falcon  was  released,  and lost a  lot  of  money  on
promoting and importing it,  because no one wanted to buy  it!  I
went  through  Atari  magazines  closing,   advertisements  being
delayed,  hungry  other Danish Atari dealers slagging me  off  to
mutual  customers  of ours,  because business was hard  and  they
wanted them for themselves.
 I  saw the Lynx lose to the Game Boy,  and the ST Pad rise  from
the dead in the shape of the Apple Newton.
 When the Jaguar was released,  I was just about to give up,  but
decided to give it one last try.  I specialised in Falcon and STE
games  and  everything that had to do with the  Jag.  The  Falcon
games  were delayed,  delayed,  delayed.  The Jaguar  games  were
delayed and in short supply and not good  enough.  Still,  Jaguar
games was the single most profitable product type I've ever sold.
Sales helped regain some of the money I had lost on all the other
Atari stock,  and so did the last "everything must go" sale, when
I  closed CFN-DATA in 1995.  It took a few drinks before I  could
write the letter to the tax and custom authorities and tell  them
that CFN-DATA was no more.
 Apart from selling Atari products,  I have released a  shareware
program, "Modest - The Module Organizer", which was well received
by ACN in Holland and got a nice 80% review in ST Format, as well
as  being  included  (the demo version)  on  their  "Subscriber's
Wonderdisk 68" in March '95.  To date,  I have received 1 (that's
ONE) registration. Still, I'm just about to release my next Atari
shareware title, "WizPack", an AI package.
 In 1994,  I bought 225 Atari shares,  hoping the Jaguar would do
really well. Seems I lost even more money!
 I was going to do a Danish version of TOS 5.0,  the TOS that was
never released. Atari Holland had given me the go-ahead and I was
waiting for a development kit.  It never arrived. When I enquired
in  writing,  a short note told me that it just wasn't  going  to
happen.  That was when the ever helpful Atari started to give the
impression  that "we couldn't care less about you if  you're  not
developing for the Jaguar".
 So why did I go through all this.  And why did we all go through
all this,  owning a machine that was so "difficult",  rather than
just going for a PC or a Mac?  Because we knew we were right.  We
knew we had a machine that could do what we wanted it to  do,  in
the nicest and most user friendly way. We knew we were supporting
a company that just kept on coming up with technological wonders,
even if they didn't know how to sell them!
 There  has always been a very friendly atmosphere in  the  Atari
community,  and generally,  it was a pleasure for me to deal with
the  Danish Atari enthusiasts during those 6 turbulent  years.  I
didn't  mind spending hours and hours tracking down some Mega  ST
TV modulator or some ancient game that was only ever released for
the French market!  It was a pleasure to share knowledge and help
out.
 Considering  this,  it's  no surprise to find that  one  of  the
longest  living disk magazines ever,  was created for  the  Atari
format. I am of course talking of ST NEWS, a disk mag I've been a
loyal reader of for several years. But not just a reader. For two
years,  I have had the honour of being the Danish distributer and
occasional writer.
 I  think  that ST NEWS more than anything  reflects  the  before
mentioned friendlyness and enthusiasm of the Atari community, but
also  the  diversity  of  it,  with  all  sorts  of  non-computer
articles,  from travelling to fiction to music. And just think of
all  the  people who have contributed to this magazine  over  the
years.  It shows commitment and interest,  and an eager to  share
experiences and ideas with other people.
 It is of course with great sadness that I write these last words
for the final issue of ST NEWS,  but it's time to move on,  and I
am  confident that most people will appreciate that the  magazine
stops now, when it's still considered respectable reading.
 ST NEWS will stand as an institution in the history of the Atari
scene, and as one of the only Atari stories with a happy ending.
 From me,  it's goodbye, take care, thanks for the interest, hope
to see/hear/read you again,  and let's just hear it once more for
the man at the anchor - Richaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaard Karsmakers!
                                        Casper Falkenberg Nielsen

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 As  the final chapter of ST NEWS' 10 year long life draws  to  a
close, I cannot help thinking about what has happened during this
period within the micro-computer field.
 Remember  the situation in 1986:  The market was filled with  as
many computers as standards. Choosing a computer was like betting
money  -  either  the  computer  was  successful  (in  that  case
everything  was  OK),  or  it wasn't,  and you ended  up  with  a
computer  without any support,  just like a car  without  petrol.
This may seem dangerous, but in fact it was very exciting, as new
technologies  and  innovations kept coming up to  catch  people's
interest. Nowadays you only have two standards (one of them - the
Mac  -  being in deep trouble) and the only  innovations  concern
gains  in processor-speed or software-updates.  Some people  call
this a mature market, I call it a boring market.
 But  let's  get back to Richard and ST  NEWS.  During  these  10
years,  Richard  has worked hard to provide,  on a more  or  less
regular  basis,  a high-quality product for free.  We  have  read
interviews  of  illustrious people that paper  mags  have  simply
skipped,  and the articles have had varied and (most of the time)
interesting topics. Richard has also come up with firsts, such as
real-time articles (remember TEX's trip to Holland?).
 So  thanks a lot to Richard (and his various partners  over  the
years,   among  which  Stefan  Posthuma  is  probably  the   most
important) for having provided Atari ST owners with great reading
and fun.  And thanks for an unforgettable STNICCC!  And good luck
to all you Atari-fans out there...
                       Klaus Berg, a.k.a. Vantage of ST Connexion

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 To  my  mind,  ST  NEWS  has chronicled  the  history  of  Atari
computers  more  faithfully than any other magazine -  more  than
that,   it  has  reflected  a  culture.  I'll  never  forget  the
excitement  of   reading  how TEX or  The  Carebears  had  jumped
another seemingly impossible programming hurdle or the feeling of
satisfaction when I found a hidden article.
 Purely as a writer,  I respect Richard's (and Stefan's)  ability
to make anything from show visits to raster interrupt programming
interesting  and the editorial standards have  been  outstanding.
Yep,  the  Atari scene will lose something special when the  last
issue of ST NEWS is published,  but the back issues will continue
to be read for many years, I am sure.
                                    Nial Grimes, freelance writer
                        ("ST Review", "ST Format", "Atari World")

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 "There  must  be some mistake - are you not a  greater  computer
than  the Milliard Gargantubrain at Maximegalon which  can  count
all the atoms in a star in a millisecond?"
                                              Lunkwill in THHGTTG


 How  could  I prepare for  something  like  this?  Well,  relfex
actions  caused me to boot "Froggies over the Fence"  and  almost
purposely press the reset button.  Yes,  I was to sit myself down
and read the Richard Karsmakers World Record Scrolltext.  After a
couple  of hours of reading (I didn't pause it once - is  that  a
record too?),  it reached the end.  Just to prove I did read  it,
the  text  ends  with ")!" (in  that  order),  the  173013th  and
173014th bytes of text, if I remember correctly.
 But  as you may have guessed,  despite my reading of the  entire
history  of ST NEWS (up to the date of that demo  anyway),  I  am
still  at  a loss to find something to say  about  the  magazine.
You've probably noticed this already as I've now completed  three
paragraphs of minimalistic content.  I know,  I'll tell you how I
got into this Dutch disk magazine frenzy...
 If I look through the number labels on my disks (yes,  I  number
each disk - sad I know),  I can work out which of my ST NEWS pile
of disks arrived first.  And indeed the lowest number is disk 396
-  Volume 7 Issue 2 to quote the issue number  (hey,  and  volume
number!).  That fact that it contains Richard Davey's (of  Falcon
Owners Group fame) handwriting,  would suggest that he landed  me
up  with  my  first  ever issue of ST NEWS  (and  also  my  first
"Maggie",  etc  - I owe a lot to this particular  guy  (including
supplying me with my first ST)).
 Now I have booted up Vol 7 Iss 2 (the one previously  mentioned)
on the computer to my left.  I would have done it earlier, but it
was downloading something (puh!). The tune "Judgement Day" by Big
Alec starts to hum through my speakers and the scan rate jumps up
to 60Hz - ooh, this is the ST NEWS flavour! As I skip through the
dropdown menus (luckily my Blitter chip is engaged),  I  remember
this issue well.  I fact it's the one that started me in my quest
for other issues.
 And quest for issues I did, and I now have rather more than just
7.2. In total I probably only have about a measly two-thirds, but
at  least I've recently found time to read them all,  instead  of
the majority of them sitting like ornaments in my disk  box.  The
best time was when I wrote directly to Richard requesting  issues
1.1 through 3.4 (incl.  compendiums - the maximum that would  fit
on  4 floppies).  It was really interesting to read these  issues
from  '86  and '87 especially.  It's only comparable  to  reading
scroll texts in equally old demos.
 Now as we enter the phase of praising Richard personally, I must
apologise  in  advance for sounding too much like I'm  leading  a
funeral service.
   Seriously  though,   we  must  appreciate  that  Richard  (and
additionally Stefan) have dedicated an unimaginably huge part  of
their  lives  to  bring  us this  most  excellent  of  disk-based
publications  on  a regular basis.  They have done  this  over  a
period of 10 years now. And even when (now using knowledge gained
from  the  mega-scrolltext)  they thought  issues  could  get  no
better,  have  eaten  their own words as an  even  greater  issue
followed.
 The  immense and dynamic content of ST NEW has reached a  climax
in the more recent issues. This includes interviews with the kind
of  people that you would never dream of being interviewed  in  a
non-commercial  specialist magazine like this.  Coupled with  the
excellent  Adventure Solutions,  these features gave ST NEWS  the
leading edge in the disk magazine field.
 Richard will now have a well-earned change after many  memorable
years  of ST NEWS and keeping us topped-up with our fixes of  the
digital drug (!).

                              _oOo_

 The  author was assisted in the writing of this "Eulogy" by  the
toneful  pop sound and screaming guitars of the debut album  from
British  band "Ash".  Gratitude also goes to the two mugs  of  PG
Tips  tea  that  I consumed in the process  (okay,  maybe  a  few
digestive biscuits aswell).
                           Jonathan Nott (a.k.a. Vogue of Skynet)

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 A Sad day indeed,  did you realise,  Richard, that it is 7 years
almost to the day since we first met? We were all so young and so
naive.  Parting  is such sweet sorrow.  I will miss  you  dearly.
Thanks for all you have done over the years for the ST Scene, the
few  years  at  the  end of the Eighties and  the  Start  of  the
Nineties were a great laugh and ST NEWS provided the  inspiration
for  the The Lost Boys and many of the other groups  who  emerged
onto the ST Scene.  You helped us meet many people with whom I am
still  very great friends.  All the pages of and pages  of  stuff
that  you and Stefan wrote over the years provided amusement  for
many.  The STNICCC was cool and will never be forgotten.  All the
best  in  you future endeavours and best wishes to  everyone  who
still reads!
                         Tim Moss a.k.a. Manikin of the Lost Boys

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 ST  NEWS was one of the first things that came to  my  attention
when I entered the Atari scene 7 years ago.  The very first thing
was,  of  course,  the  21 games that was included in  my  "Super
Pack."  But  in those days,  before everyone had  access  to  the
Internet,  ST NEWS was my only chance to read about what happened
on  the ST scene in the rest of the world.  Sure,  there  existed
some magazines,  like "ST User" and "ST World",  but they  didn't
cover anything about the "underground" scene,  where demos showed
up, adventures were solved and funny text articles were written.
 As I live in Norway,  I know the whole story about the origin of
"ST  Klubben",  a  Norwegian disk magazine based on the  ST  NEWS
idea.  As you all know, the people behind these two magazines had
a lot of contact with each other,  which meant that "ST  Klubben"
and the people behind it (mainly Ronny,  Karl Anders and the  Ose
brothers) where frequently referred to in ST NEWS.  This made  ST
NEWS
 even more interesting.
 As  ST  NEWS  became bigger,  in the sense that  they  got  more
readers, more contributors and more distributors, I think Richard
and  Stefan  got more eager to work even  harder.  The  real-time
articles  that  evolved in that time,  were in  my  opinion  well
written and extremely funny.  The editorials, hidden articles and
scroll texts,  much of the time referring to alcohol,  girls  and
heavy metal were often the best articles on the disk, despite the
fact that they had little to do with our dear computer.
 I  am  a  Falcon  owner  now.  I  use  this  computer  only  for
programming  funny  little things.  The Falcon is a  much  better
machine  than  the ST ever was,  but I still can't  help  feeling
bored and isolated on this thing. Few write good software for the
Falcon.  There are very few commercial games written specific for
the Falcon. Worst of all, most of the excellent games from the ST
do  not even work on the Falcon.  All this is because Bill  Gates
has  made  most of the brilliant minds from  the  various  scenes
convert to PC freaks.
 In  all  this terrible time from WHEN the  Falcon  was  released
until  today,  where most of the ST owners I know have  fled  the
scene,  and even Atari has gone to sleep,  we have still had  the
soul of the Atari ST with us,  with the continuation of  releases
of undead ST NEWS issues. Now even this landmark is chopped down,
and we are left with nothing.
 This  situation is very similar to what happened to  the  Dragon
computer  scene  some  years ago,  before  the  16-bit  computers
revolutionised  the world.  Dragon went bankrupt early,  but  the
Dragon scene kept on for a long time. After a while, though, even
this  remarkable  computer  had to  make  way  for  technological
improvement.  When  "Dragon  User" finally  quit,  the  patriotic
Dragon scene could finally state that their game was over.  This,
I think, is what is happening to the ST/Falcon scene now that our
beloved ST NEWS has ceased to exist.
                                                 Tor Egil Hovland

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 What does (or did) ST NEWS mean to me?  Hmm...  not sure what to
say in these obituary type things,  which I guess this is, kinda.
Of course,  I always enjoyed the mixture of reviews and  articles
as well as the other oddities such as human interest and stories.
Always  harassing some poor unsuspecting postie when  the  latest
issue failed to make the doormat. I liked it so much so I decided
I  had  to contribute in some small way.  To which  end  ST  NEWS
proved to be a highly enjoyable,  educational and rewarding means
to  express myself and hopefully entertain other similarly  like-
minded people as they have entertained me over the years.
 Perhaps  a more personal and true measure of what ST NEWS  means
to  me  can be expressed in terms of the amount I put  in  to  it
compared to what I got back in return. I gained a good friend and
contact in Richard Karsmakers (who was there to help me through a
bit  a  emotional  rocky  patch) who  proved  to  be  a  positive
inspiration.  It can also be seen to be directly responsible  for
me  getting  to  know  other Atari  scene  dignitaries  like  the
"Maggie" team (Chris and Richard), Reservoir Gods (Leon, Tash and
Kev),  the PHF (Phil),  and a few others. It also looks damn good
on  a CV as well as being a pretty good conversational  gambit  -
I'll never forget the look on Kev Davies' face when I told him  I
wrote for ST NEWS. Gob-smacked in the extreme! I will remember ST
NEWS
  as  one of those defining moments or turning points  in  my
life that started me on the road to bigger and, hopefully, better
things.
 Thanks Richard,  for producing such a great diskmag.  I raise my
(pint) glass in salute whilst simultaneously blowing trumpet-like
into   a  big  soggy  hanky  -  the  monsoon  one  reserved   for
particularly emotional moments.
                                                    Michael Noyce

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 All these people,  thanks for your kind words. Remember, without
you there would not have been any fun writing ST NEWS. Stefan and
me always lived off the feedback we got,  and it's what kept  the
magazine alive all these years.
 I won't end this article with saying, "Farewell".
                                                          Richard 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.