Skip to main content
© Impact

DAS FLOPPY ARBEITSBUCH by Richard Karsmakers

About one or two months ago, Sybex announced the launch of a book 
for  people that want to get the most out of their  disk  drives. 
The book is supplied with hard cover on 168 pages,  together with 
a so-called Power Disk.  The book is written in German.  It costs 
DM 69,- (together with the disk) and can be bought through  Sybex 
Verlag  GmbH,  Vogelsanger  Weg 111,  4000  Düsseldorf  30,  West 
Germany.  Tel.  0211/618020. ISBN 3-88745-642-4, written by Peter 
Maier, Ralf Stöpper and Frank Aumann.

The  book immediately starts with an explanation of some  general 
specifications of the Atari disk drives,  that are normally  also 
contained  in your disk drive's manual.  However,  on page 8  the 
writers  already  start writing about  Frequency  Modulation  and 
Modified Frequency Modulation (the ways in which actual bits  are 
written down using magnetic pulses on a diskette),  which I think 
is  a  bit  too much for any  beginner.  They  immediately  start 
working  in hex,  binary,  and are talking about a whole  lot  of 
technical  terms,  varying from GAP to Cyclic Redundancy  Checks. 
This  makes  the book a bit difficult for most  beginners,  so  I 
would  not recommend it to most people.  If you are one of  these 
nutty  floppy freaks (like me),  however,  the book supplies  you 
with  a healthy dose (or more like an overdose)  of  information. 
The  writers came to the stunning idea to print out a  documented 
TOS booter listing (in assembly language,  of course), as well as 
a  lot of sample programs of how to program the disk  drive  from 
XBIOS,  BIOS  or GEMDOS.  The book is,  to say  the  least,  very 
comprehensive;  it covers most of the disk drives'  topics,  from 
FDC   programming   (direct  programming  of  the   Floppy   Disk 
Controller), working with DMA (Direct Memory Access), bugs in the 
XBIOS  and lots more,  to even a list of addresses  of  important 
routines and variables used by the Operating System in  different 
TOS versions (V0.13, V0.19 and ROM TOS).

Chapter 7 of the book is entirely devoted to the Power Disk  that 
is  supplied with the book (it is kept in the back cover  of  the 
book).  That  power  disk  contains several  source  programs  in 
machine  language  as well as C,  and a program that  allows  FAT 
reading (this is very handy if you want to look at which  sectors 
are used by which program,  etc.).  The main program on the disk, 
however,  is  called "Power".  This is a program under  GEM  that 
includes a copier,  a disk monitor, a clone (which enables  track 
scanning,  single  track formatting and more) and several  useful 
options. Although I find Michtron Disk Utilities or the G-Diskmon 
easier  to  use  than the included Disk Monitor,  a  lot  can  be 
learned from this program.  It isn't possible to backup protected 
software with the included copier, however.

Altogether,  "Das  Floppy  Arbeitsbuch" is very useful  for  more 
experienced Floppy freaks,  but definately not recommendable  for 
beginning disk freaks;  they would probably drown in the flood of 
information offered by even the first pages of the book.  I think 
the beginning floppy freaks just need to wait a bit longer,  'til 
I've  finished my "Atari ST Floppy Reference Guide" (in spite  of 
the title,  it will be written in Dutch).  I hope to have done so 
by the summer of this year.

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.