Skip to main content
© Knighthawks

I think that FORTH is a language,
that a grade school child can learn to use effectivily,
if it is presented in bit sized pieces,
with the proper motivation.

      Charles H. Moore

STRENGTH IN FORTH PART ONE: HAS FORTH GOT A MOTHER? by C. Janssen

To  begin with:  FORTH is a computerlanguage,  about 17 years  of 
age.  It  takes  us back to the  seventies..U.S.A...and  an  IBM-
1130........
It  would  be a waste of time to tell you the  whole  of  FORTH's 
history at this stage. Read about that in BYTE ( august 1980 ).
Whereas Charles H. Moore, the father of FORTH, himself wrote that 
article,  you can't accuse me of gossiping either.  FORTH is more 
than  merely  a  computerlanguage;   learning  FORTH  is  equally 
adapting  an  attitude to programming a  computer.  If  you  were 
programming before e.g.  in BASIC,  you will have to modify  your 
way of thinking.  If you weren't you will gradually develop  that 
attitude.  "Keep  it  simple",  is the adagium  by  which  FORTH-
programming is best described. Simplicity leads to programs, that 
are well lined-out, well structured, readable and flexible.
There is something more about FORTH you should know. In FORTH the 
programmer is held responsible for what the computer will perform 
at the end of all.  FORTH is not a foreseeable language;  it will 
not think,  where you failed to do so.  So you can't blame  FORTH 
nor your computer when the outcome of your blood, sweat and tears 
is rubbish.  What kind of language is FORTH ?  A good one in  the 
first place.
Still a queer one for whom is attached to BASIC or Pascal.
FORTH is an interactive,  extensible,  high-level language,  very 
fast  and very compact and highly transportable.  (For a  curious 
eye only: FORTH can also be described as an interpretive threaded 
language. The threading can be direct or indirect. There are some 
FORTH-impementations   which  are  true   compilers.   They   use 
machinecode  subroutine  threaded  code,  instead of  a  list  of 
addresses.  The exact meaning of all this will be explained, when 
we will dig in the dictionary.)

INTERACTIVITY

What we are going to do next,  is demonstrating some features  of 
FORTH to underline the description of FORTH, we gave above.
Why hesitate ?  Grab your FORTH-disc,  crumple it into your drive 
and  squeeze that mouse,  or strike a key.  (FORTH  won't  strike 
back....not  yet  !!).  I suppose you've got a manual  with  your 
FORTH-system.  Read  it carefully on how to handle in your  case, 
adapting  if minor differences occur.  Such as:  typing upper or
lowercase, maximumlength of words etc. etc.
In demonstrating things I will use words,  which I won't  explain 
immediately. You don't mind that, I assume.
Now a word on typing FORTH.
As space allows the planets and stars to make their  revolutions, 
a space allows a FORTH-word to turn around and make its moves. So 
between  every word at least one space is a must.  All output  of 
FORTH will be  underlined. (In the text, not on your screen !!).
FORTH is interactive. You type, FORTH types back.
Now type 3 5 +  .  (Where I type ,  you press RETURN  instead). 
FORTH says OK. See ? You type, FORTH types back. Interactivity !!
Don't  bother about that +-sign hanging around at the end of  the 
addition. You will learn "why" soon enough.
EXTENDING...

Now type VLIST  OK.  Or type WORDS  OK.  No,  that was not  The 
Holy Bible nor modern poetry  stumbling down your  monitorscreen; 
it was FORTH's dictionary. Remember that ! It is a very important 
feature  of  FORTH.  In some respects all  those  words  resemble 
statements,  functions and directives in BASIC. Don't confuse the 
FORTH-expression   "word"  with  the  16-bit  value  that   other 
languages  call  a word and that in FORTH is called  a  cell.  In 
BASIC you get a closed,  delimited package of the  language.  But 
not so in FORTH........
Now type VLIST , and hit a key or something else. Anyway, try to
stop the listing in order to see the very beginning of VLIST, the
word on top of the dictionary:  CREATE.  (Your FORTH may have  an 
other word on top of course. It just depends......)
Keep it in mind. Now enter : HELLO  ." Hideehi !" ;   OK. Done ?
You didn't forget to type : and ; ? You must, you know.
Now show the dictionary in paged mode again. And be surprised !
On top of the dictionary isn't CREATE, but HELLO. By Jove !!  You
just  entered  a  new word into  the  dictionary,  which  is  now 
extended.  Don't  believe  them  Basics;  FORTH  will  treat  his 
youngest  child  in the very same way as he  treats  his  beloved 
older ones.  That's extensibility !  Enter HELLO   Hideehi OK  . 
Now let's mix the new HELLO with some older words. Enter : HELLOS  
3 0 DO HELLO CR LOOP ;    OK . To prove my words, enter HELLOS  
Hideehi
Hideehi
Hideehi OK
 . No discrimination, eh ? Quod erat demonstrandum. 
ERRRORSSSSSsssssssht.....

Did you notice that FORTH always said OK when all ended well ?
Alas,  some of us   computerpeople do make mistakes,  even  using 
FORTH !( Don't panic, they live abroad. I know one ).
Enter :  FENCE ;  MSG #4 FENCE is not unique OK. Now this is not 
really  an error;  it is a warning and the only one FORTH  gives. 
The  word FENCE was already placed in the dictionary,  now it  is 
not longer unique.  FORTH doesn't bother,  you may redefine FENCE 
and  all  other  words  as often as you like  and  in  which  way 
whatsoever. FORTH always considers the last definition as the one 
to be used in new definitions.  But....you guessed, don't...FORTH 
won't bother, I said, but you will !! Executing  new FENCE, FORTH 
will  do nothing.  And that's not we want a computer  to  do.  So 
let's forget about FENCE. Make a paged VLIST. FENCE is on top, as 
you  can see.  Now enter FORGET FENCE  OK.  Make a  paged  VLIST 
again.  See, FORTH has completely forgotten about FENCE i.e. that 
do-nothing-FENCE,  as  the  original  is  still  there.  See  for 
yourself. Convinced ? Yes ? Thank you. So FORTH is extensible ànd 
destructable as well.
Now enter :  LUNATIC 5 3 = IF ." Well,  Pythagoras ?" ;  MSG #19 
Conditionals not paired
. (I.e you forgot THEN or ENDIF )
And not OK ?  No, no, this time it is really an error. You didn't 
complete a loop.  And that's not OK. In this situation the FORTH-
system  is likely to collapse,  if the error was allowed to  pass 
undetected.  So FORTH struggles for life. The error-detecting and 
reporting facilities are poor  in FORTH, as to allow FORTH to run 
at maximum speed. For example, there is nothing to prevent you to 
fill the entire dictionary with nulls. Responsible, remember ?!
On the other hand you can rebuild FORTH to your exact demands and 
that's  flexibility.  Of  course yòu won't need all  this  error-
stuff, but it is handy to know.... helping your friends.

HIGH-LEVEL

FORTH  is a high-level language.  They told me  that.  High-level 
means here,  that FORTH itself has been written in an other (low-
level)   language,   such   as  68000   machine-code.   In   most 
implementations of FORTH,  part of it is written in machine-code, 
part of it in...FORTH.
If high-level means,  that a computerlanguage more or less  takes 
after  the human language,  then FORTH is all  that  too.  FORGET 
FENCE sounds quite human,  isn't it ?  The more human,  as  FENCE 
indeed  is  a barrier.  "Behind" it words are  protected  against 
FORGETting.

TRANSPORTABILITY

Most  FORTH-systems  consists  of three  main  parts:  -  FORTH's 
precompiled dictionary;
- FORTH's Editor;
- FORTH's Assembler.

You already saw the dictionary.  The editor will be spoken of  in 
the near future.  The Assembler....I really don't know. I will of 
course write about the pecularities of a FORTH-assembler, but the 
assemblerlanguage itself ...well, read the course elsewhere in ST
NEWS.
 Besides, I have some other devotions too, you know !!
The third reason is now to be explained.
The FORTH Standard Team (a committee of main FORTH-users, amateur
as  well as professional) now and then specifies  very  precisely 
the requirements of a standard system:  e.g. the 79-standard, the 
83-standard. These requirements involve the minimum Required Word 
Set  as well as the resources of the host computer.  On  whatever 
computer FORTH may  run,  the Required Word Set will be virtually 
the   same.   The  Assembler  will  differ,   depending  on   the 
microprocessor. I don't know a bit about the MC68000 yet. Clear ?
Not  only the Assembler will differ,  the hardware of a  specific 
computer sets its limits to  e.g.  graphics,  disc-handling,  the 
operating   system  may  have  its  characteristic   effects   on 
implementing a FORTH-system, but using the required word set on a 
mainframe will produce  the same outcome as on a Aquarius.
More,  the  possibility of extending your system may enlarge  the 
portability between systems. Suppose your system lacks 2VARIABLE.

Well, define it ! In this way : 2VARIABLE CREATE 0 , 0 , ; SPEEDY 
AND COMPACT


I brought up the Assembler in relation to FORTH's compactness and 
speed  of execution.  In Acorn User ( June 1986 ) David  Johnson-
Davies  described how 10 different languages coped with the  same 
benchmark. They were all BBC-B implementations, so running on the 
6502-processor. The results:

Language            Code size (bytes)        Time (secs)
Assembler             215                     2.64
S.Pascal              424(machinecode)        19
FORTH                 58                      21
BCPL                  60 (Clintcode)          42
ISO-Pascal            68 (BI-code)            70
ISO-Pascal (fl. pnt)  80 (BI-code)            79
BASIC                 82                      185
BASIC (fl. pnt)       67                      248
Lisp                  204                     326
Microprolog           366                     359

The table makes another point very clear. If you got to be faster 
than your shadow,  the only way of improving FORTH's speed is  to 
program your time-critical FORTH-routines in the FORTH-assembler.
Yes, FORTH is fast,compact and (again) versatile.
It was the ATARI-company to write a FORTH-language, in which they 
programmed  their world-famous games.  In learning FORTH you  are 
not far away from home !

THE STACK AND RPN

Now  enter 3 5 +  OK.  We've done that earlier.  But we did  not 
care for the result at that moment.  We will do now.   Enter . . 
Enter what?  Yes, a dot is a FORTH-word. To clarify things a bit, 
let us type FORTH-words in braces:  { }. So enter {.}  8OK. See, 
FORTH   knew   it  !   You  might  have   thought   otherwise.... 
Nevertheless,   numbercrunching   is   not  very   popular   with 
FORTH.  For his arithmetic,  FORTH uses a stack and  R.P.N.  That 
struck   you  right  in  the  face,   didn't   it   ?   Non-FORTH 
creatures describe their arithmetic operations in infix notation,
i.e.  the operator (+ - * / ) is placed between the operands (the 
numbers):  3 + 5. In R.P.N. or postfix notation the operators are 
fixed after the operands. Lisp uses the third possibility: prefix 
notation. The operator advances the operands:( PLUS 3 5 ).
R.P.N. is short for Reverse Polish Notation.   Why Polish ? Well, 
it  was  a  Polish  logician,  J.  Lukasiewicz, who  invented  an 
extremely concise and readily mechanised method to write  logical 
definitions. ( A computer is all logic, remember ?). The stack is 
due  to  the  reversed notation.  A stack is a  certain  type  of 
computermemory.  Almost all languages make use of a stack. Mostly 
hidden  from  the  programmer.  As FORTH  promised  you  complete 
control of your machine, you may as well control the stack.
The  FORTH-stack is a LIFO-stack.  LIFO stands for Last In  First 
Out.  The  last item put on the stack,  is the only one  you  can 
easily  move from the stack,  without  further  manipulation.  To 
reach  the fifth item,  you have to remove all four items  above. 
Imagine a pile of trays.  The one on top is the only one you  can 
comfortably  remove,  without breaking the rest.  Forth  has  two 
stacks.  The one meant here and now is called computationstack or 
parameterstack,  as for the two possible actions:  arithmetic and 
parameterpassing.
A  word may produce items (values and addresses),  leave them  on 
the  stack,  where  an other word can find them and use  them  to 
fulfill  its  task,  passing other items  to  other  words...etc. 

That's parameterpassing. Putting items  onto the  stack, the ones 
already  there  are  pushed further 'downwards'.  The  stack  has 
only one entrance, from on top.
There are no backdoors or side-entrances.  Top of stack is a very 
common  expression  in  writing about the  stack.  I'll  use  the 
abbreviation  TOS  (Top  Of Stack).  The other  stack  is  called 
returnstack.  On  this stack FORTH puts a list of pointers as  to 
keep  track  of  what to do next on his dizzy  trip  through  the 
labyrinth of your Atari.
You  may  use the returnstack as some extra hand  to  temporarely 
store numbers. 

BEHAVIOURISM

When a FORTH-word is typed at the keyboard it is usually executed 
as soon as the RETURN-key is pressed.  Executing a word FORTH has 
a run-time-behaviour.  FORTH then carries out the various  tasks, 
the  programmer  wanted the computer to do when he  was  creating 
that particular word.  But earlier,  when the programmer  entered 
(at last) his newly created word,  FORTH had to turn to  compile-
time-behaviour.  FORTH  then wrote the new word in  a  dictionary 
form  in  the  dictionary.   This  process  is  often  termed  as 
compilation,  but  strictly  accurate  it would  be  to  call  it 
interpretation.  Compilation  should produce native  machinecode, 
rather then a list of addresses.  But as you will learn soon both 
words are in the dictionary:  INTERPRET and COMPILE.  Does  FORTH 
confuse you ?
Pfeeeew !  That's enough for today.  O yes,  answering that silly 
question in the headline:  no !!  FORTH has got a father, Charles 
H. Moore.

SUMMARY

FORTH was invented by Charles H.  Moore in 1969. Apart from being 
a  computer  language,  it is also an attitude to  programming  a 
computer.  FORTH  is  an  interactive  ,  extensible,  high-level 
language, fast, compact and highly transportable.
Statements,  functions,  directives,  logical,  arithmetical  and 
stack  operators  are  called WORDS.  A word  is  an  indivisable 
element  through which FORTH executes.  Indivisable  here  means: 
nothing  can be left out to achieve the goal the word is  created 
for.  Words are stored in the DICTIONARY.  A dictionary is not  a 
fixed entity. Words can be added, words can be deleted.

As  the programmer is fully responsible,  FORTH's  error-messages 
are  limited.  All number handling is carried out on  the  STACK
This  stack  is  also used to pass parameters from  one  word  to 
another.
On the RETURNSTACK FORTH holds the information (pointers) to keep 
track of what to do next. The status of FORTH can be EXECUTION or 
COMPILATION. Executing a word FORTH fulfills his predefined task. 
Compiling  a  word  FORTH writes a word as a  new  entry  in  the 
dictionary in a particular form.

REMEMBER

R.P.N.          - Reverse Polish Notation or postfix notation is 
                   a way of writing down a arithmetic formula.
                   The operator(s) follow(s) the operands.
{VLIST}         - Outputs the contents of the actual dictionary.
{WORDS}         - Identical to {VLIST} in other systems.
{+}             - Adds two (single-length) numbers on top of  the                   
                   stack and replaces them by the result.
{.}             - Outputs the top stack item,  removing it  from 
                   the stack.

EXTRAS

This course is limited. The limits are set  in the first place by 
the  know-how  of me,  the writer.  There are  several  different 
implementations  of FORTH on the Atari ST and I don't  have  them 
all  at hand.  Secondly there is the amount of time  between  one 
issue  of ST NEWS and the next one.....and ooooh waiting  !!!  In 
the third place ST NEWS is not a FORTH-magazine.
So  some additional reading may do you good.  There are  lots  of 
good books about FORTH.  I just mention one title. That's because 
I think,  it's the best book ever written on computers and FORTH. 
Although  it  is  not adapted - as far as I know -  to  the  '83-
standard,  you will ENJOY reading it.  The book:  STARTING FORTH, 
Leo Brodie,  ISBN 0-13-842930-8 (hardcover),  ISBN  0-13-842922-7 
(paperback).  And I can recommend you WATERSHIPDOWN,  'cause it's 
fun.

EXERCISES

Save your strength for next time !! Best wishes !!

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.