Skip to main content
© Pain

SOFTWARE REVIEW: SIGNUM! by Richard Karsmakers

I had heard a lot about "Signum!" even as the program hadn't been 
seen yet.  When I wrote to Application Systems to review  Art-and 
Film Director (they directed me to PDS,  by the way),  I received 
an apology home, printed out with "Signum!". It didn't stun me: I 
just   thought  the  whole  damn  thing  was  printed   on   some 
laserprinter  or  something  of the  kind.  I  completely  forgot 
"Signum!"  and  went on processing words on good  old  "1st  Word 
Plus".

It  was at the open day at the ST Club in Eindhoven on the  first 
Saturday of Februari that Mr.  Geukens of Club Veldhoven  proudly 
showed me a printed out sample of "Signum!". I didn't believe him 
when he told me that it was actually made on a 9-needle  printer! 
But  it  turned  out  to be as true  as  can  be!  I  immediately 
contacted Commedia and recently I have received the  program,  to 
test  it out.  They said to be working on a Dutch version of  the 
manual, but I still had to do this review with help of the German 
manual.  Am I lucky my knowledge of German is good enough so I am 
at least able to read it fairly well...

The  program is supplied on two disks,  and the proggram  itself, 
the printer programs, the font editors, etc. aren't protected. So 
it's  very easy to copy the program to harddisk or make a  backup 
of it.  The secret is a program called "INSTALL".  This has to be 
executed before any of the other programs are  loaded,  otherwise 
they  simple refuse to work.  This "INSTALL" program  is  heavily 
protected,  and  it has to be run from either of the  two  disks, 
which both include the actual disk protection.
But  that's  enough about that fuss.  Let's have a  look  at  the 
program.  On  startup,  one is met by quite a normal  starting-up 
screen:  A piece of 'paper' on which you can type, a menu bar and 
some option grids on the lower side of the screen. This seemingly 
simple program,  however,  offers the user the most advanced word 
processing capabilities - and more.

The  thing that's revolutionary about "Signum!" is the fact  that 
it is completely pixel-orientated.  This means that any character 
on the screen can be moved pixel by pixel.  Because of this  fact 
it   is  possible  to  create  advanced   physics/maths/chemistry 
formulas  and more.  Through a parameters menu it is possible  to 
define word distance, character distance, line distance and more. 

You  can,  of  course,  set TABs (which can also  be  permanently 
displayed over the whole screen). Things like justify,  word wrap 
and  other usual features of the modern word processor  are  also 
included. You can use headlines, footlines, page numbering (left, 
right,  middle or left/right according to the page number),  etc. 
The  program  is  clearly aimed at people who  need  proper  word 
processing capabilities (with high quality print-outs), and it is 
prices  accordingly  - in Germany,  the price  is  DM  448,-.  At 
Commedia's (Eerste Looierdwarsstraat 12,  1016 VM, Amsterdam, The 
Netherlands),  the  prices go down by the day so you should  call 
them (Holland 020-231740) for the latest prices there.

"Signum!" offers quite a lot (it should,  for the amount of money 
you  have to pay to get it).  Things most word  processors  don't 
offer,  like  macro-key programming,  the loading of up to 7  (!) 
different fonts in one document (in practise, this means not more 
than 7 different character sets on one page) and much  more.  Let 
us have a look at the PROS and CONS of the program:

PROS:
- The program is pixel-oriented. This mean high-accuracy word
  processing capabilities
- It allows use of different fonts, that can be created using the
  font editor that is supplied with the program
- It can drive a 24-needle printer as well as most 9-needle ones
- Macro-key programming is allowed
- The quality of the printout is extremely high

CONS:
- With  'word wrap' the word that should be wrapped is  left  on 
  the current line
- It is actually page-oriented. Inserting a piece of other Signum
  files in the middle of one page is impossible
- No pictures can be used in the program (said to be included in
  a future version)
- No  columns  are possible (said to be  included  in  a  future 
  version as well)
- 'Light' and 'Underlined' character set styles are not supported
- Printing takes quite along time (with a 9-needle printer, the
  printer head moves 6 times over one line, depending on the text
  height)
Concluding:

For  all  those people that are active  writing  club  magazines, 
semi-professional   scriptions,   professional   letters,   etc., 
"Signum!" is the program that they all have been waiting for (and 
that  they have secretly been dreaming of).  Even cheap  9-needle 
printers  can now easily be mistaken for  expensive  daisywheels, 
whereas  the realively cheap NEC P6 can easily be mistaken for  a 
true  laser-printer.  When one has a look at the group of  people 
that   the  program  is  aimed  at  (those  who  would   use   it 
professionally  or  semi-professionally),  the price is  not  bad 
either.
If you're thinking about buying the program,  but you're not  yet 
sure,  please go and have a look at your local computer  retailer 
who  happens  to  sell  the  program  and  ask  them  if  they'll 
demonstrate  it.  You'll be stunned and chilled to the bone  when 
you see what can come rolling out of a Star NL-10....

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.