Skip to main content
© Stigels of Elektra

SOFTWARE REVIEW: SPACEPORT by Richard Karsmakers

Finally  they had hired you.  Your old Guild of  Mercenaries  had 
appointed  you  to perform the task that was now required  to  be 
done.  It had been ages,  so it seemed,  since you were hired for 
the   last  time  and  a  minority  complex  had  infected   you, 
manifesting  itself  through outbursts of  agression  and  losing 
selfcontrol.

They couldn't take this assignment from you anymore.  You  slowly 
put on your safety belt and helmet,  and turned on the  chopper's 
engines.  Slowly,  the base grew smaller beneath you and you were 
on  your way to this new and dangerous mission.  You put  down  a 
letter stamped "OPEN WHEN IN THE AIR" on the co-pilot chair.

"TOP SECRET",  it read on top of the letter as you glance over it 
while now moving rapidly accross vast jungles,  "Terrorists  have 
taken  refuge  in the caves of Omat,  deep  in  the  impenetrable 
jungle  of Renegade,  an asteroid in the Phaeton  asteroid  belt. 
They have taken hostages, amongst which several high ranked army-
and government officials. Vice-president of the U.S. said to have
been taken hostage as well.  Target:  Save hostages,  rescue  any 
surviving members of the Extraterrestrial Mining Pioneer Group (a 
rabble left from someone's earlier assignment),  destroy the ZEVS 
(presumably the nuclear plant in the heart of the planetoid)  and 
eliminate  terrorists.  Mission is highly dangerous." You  almost 
forgot  to read the line that was printed in red ink in the  foot 
margin:  "This message will self-destruct." Thinking back to  the 
good  ol' "Inspector Gadget" cartoons your great grandpa used  to 
talk  about having watched two centuries ago,  your lips  twisted 
into  a smile.  Hocus Pocus it was.  How could a piece  of  paper 
self-destruct? 
"Just  to be sure..." you said,  thinking about what new  gadgets 
the Ministry of Love might have developed recently, and you threw 
the  message  out of the  window.  See...nothing  happened.  Just 
another practical joke of the technical department.

On the ground,  a giant deer was drinking from a shallow pool  of 
water. The air smelled like it was going to rain any minute now - 
some birds started seeking for shelter,  knowing by instinct that 
they  would be soaking wet if they didn't.  The deer  looked  up, 
water  droplets dripping from its beak,  forming ever  increasing 
circles on the water surface. A piece of paper came gliding down.
The explosion was largely strangled by the water.
"Good  job,"  thought a crocodile that was swimming  by,  "now  I 
don't have to kill that darned deer myself..."
The birds came from their shelters,  some of them flying down  to 
the scene of the slaughter to get some gut remainder,  or just to 
wait  for the crocodile to finish diner so they could  clean  its 
teeth.

You  flew  on,  not having heard anything of what  was  going  on 
below.  Maybe this would be your last job.  Maybe, money would be 
less  hard  to get your hands on once you had rescued  all  those 
hostages.  Then,  you could finally start working for yourself  - 
perhaps even open a private Mercenary agency.  Lots of work to be 
done out there - you just had to make sure people knew  where  to 
find  you.  Your first job would probably be to get rid of  those 
soldiers  of fortune that cripled competition in the  L.A.  area. 
"The A-Team",  they called themselves.  Nasty buggers!  They just 
didn't  realise  that other people had to earn their  bread  with 
what  they did for nothing at all (and they always ran  off  with 
the girls, too).

With your mind more switched to thinking about how to destroy the 
notorious "A-Team" then on flying, you barely remain alive as you 
fly through the lava flying around above a small working volcano. 
According to the commander-in-chief, the entrance to the caves of 
Omat would be here somewhere. Probably camouflaged. More probably 
even  that it would be closed alltogether.  Lucky you  had  bombs 
that would know how to handle with things like that.

They would know that you,  Commander Dancel Warhound (that's what 
your  colleagues  called  you,   anyway  -  your  real  name  was 
Atombender  but  people  didn't like  that  because  they  always 
thought you were a nephew of Evil Elvin,  present in a well known 
computer game) was someone to reckon with!

"Spaceport"  is the name of a new game programmed by our  Eastern 
neigbours in Germany. Everybody who ever played "Fort Apocalypse" 
on the Commodore 64 will imediately see the resemblance - I  used 
to be a "Fort Apocalypse" freak myself (over three years ago)  so 
I welcomed "Spaceport" with open arms.

The  game  starts with a picture that should have  been  manually 
redone  after converting it from the Amiga (the whole game is  an 
Amiga conversion), because it's almost trash. But when the actual 
game  starts,  some  good  music comes forth  from  your  monitor 
(programmed  by  ST sound pioneer Holger Gehrmann)  and  you  can 
select levels of difficulty, turn the gravity on or off, etc.

The game itself isn't as nice to play as "Fort  Apocalypse",  but 
the  graphics  are better drawn (of  course).  The  scrolling  is 
lousy, by the way (horizontal as well as vertical).
Once down in the caves,  things start to be really difficult. All 
kinds of things are moving, you are constantly followed by camera 
eyes,  and that's the place where you'll have to rescue the  EMPG 
crew  and fly deep down into the planetoid.  If you ask  me,  the 
game  is a little bit too difficult (even on the  easiest  level, 
gravity  off).  But  it's a welcome 16-bit substitute  for  "Fort 
Apocalypse".

Game rating:

Name:                         Spaceport
Company:                      ReLINE
Sound:                        8.5
Graphics:                     8.5
Playability:                  6.5
Hookability:                  7
Remark:                       Should have been better

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.