Skip to main content
© Erik 'ES of TEX' Simon, 1989

WINTER OLYMPIAD '88by Frank Lemmen

In this time of the year,  the Olympic fever strikes again. After 
four years,  the games are now held in Calgary,  Canada.  This is 
also the place where the game called "Winter Olympiad '88"  takes 
place. Now that all sports hippies are getting high from the real 
Olympics  and they hope that the chanook stays out - if it  comes 
the  snow will melt (gna,gna).  On our computer  game,  the  snow 
never melts so we can play the Winter Olympics whenever we want.
Like  I  mentioned earlier, the real Winter Olympics and  our  own 
computer Winter Olympics are held at Calgary.
Calgary is a town in the Canadian province Alberta.  The  regular 
population of Calgary is 505.600 people, but now the Olympics are 
there, the population is 1.000.000 people and still increasing.
Calgary  is famous for the Calgary Stampede which is  held  every 
jear. Calgary got its city rights in 1893.

After this historical information, I shall start my review of the 
game.

Winter Olympics '88

The game is a sport simulation of the Winter Olympics in Calgary. 
It is published by the British software house Tynesoft.  Its code 
was  written  by Chris Robson,  the graphics were drawn  by  Paul 
Drummond and the music was composed by Wal Beban.

The games comes in a package with two disks,  a very small manual 
and  a card with all Olympic records of the games in  '84,  which 
were held in Sarajevo.
If  you start the program,  you will hear the nice music and  you 
will  witness  the  opening  screen  with  the  credits  of   the 
programmers.  After that, you'll be asked if you want to load the 
old  world records.  Next, you will be asked how many  competitors 
are (up to six can play) present to play.
After that, the competitors must type in their names and they may 
make a choice out of 18 countries which banana republic they want 
to stand for.

Next,  the  player(s) will be asked in which of the  sports  they 
want to compete. They can choose from:

                               Open ceremonies
                               Downhill
                               Skijump
                               Biathlon
                               Slalom
                               Bobsled

The  opening ceremonies are quite sober;  you'll see a  crowd  of 
people hold the boards on which the name of the game stands.

Downhill

Downhill  is very difficult to do;  you actually have  two  sight 
screens  and  it  is difficult to choose on  which  screen  you'd 
better  look.  The  main screen lets you see the athlete  on  the 
back.  The  second - much smaller - screen lets you look  through 
the skiglasses of the athlete. Personally, I like to look at both 
screens  at the same time,  but this is very difficult -  may  be 
that is the reason I never reached the finish.  On your way down, 
you'll find lots of obstacles created by mother nature herself. I 
hope that these obstacles are removed on the real Calgary  track, 
our computer sportsman can survive such crashes,  but it  remains 
to  be  seen  whether  real athletes  will  leave  such  a  track 
unscathed  (they will more probably end up with broken  bones  in 
the  weirdest parts of their bodies - even in places  where  they 
had not expected any bones to be!).

While  you're  actually racing downhill,  you  must  avoid  trees 
(fallen or still erect) as well as rocks. The 3D effect is really 
good.

Ski Jump

The next event is ski jump; on this event, you must try to fly as 
far  as you can with those skies.  On top of the tower,  it's  an 
awful  and sometimes painful way down.  If you press the  button, 
our  daredevil comes out of the hut and is ready to die for  you. 
If you press fire again,  our foolhardy suicidal hero starts  his 
run  down the tower.  When you press the button again,  he  jumps 
into the unknown.  After that,  you must correct the skies of our 
hero  so  that  he can safely land (I did it one  time  after  20 
jumps). In most cases, he breaks his back and after you press the 
button again he is healed for the next jump. 

The  most  striking part (technically spoken)  is  the  excellent 
dual-speed horizontal scrolling. Flawless!!

Biathlon

The fourth event is biathlon;  this is a sport which consists  of 
two sports - these are 'langlaufen' and target shooting.  In  the 
last  sport I'm a crack because I'm a military sharpshooter  (did 
you notice my modesty there?). With the best hopes, I started the 
game.  After  a while of bouncing my joystick to the left and  to 
the  right  I reached a shooting point where five  targets  were 
ready  to  be blown away.  My trigger finger felt itchy  but  the 
sight  was drifting around; I started correcting it but  this  was 
rather difficult to do.  If my UZI or my FAL reacted that way,  I 
would not be able to shoot cow from 1 metre distance.  So,  after 
this  first disappointing round,  I started skieing (I hope  it's 
properly   spelled  -  if  not,   write  angry  letters  to   our 
correspondence  address  and blame Richard.  After  all,  he  was 
supposed  to check my English) again.  After a few more  shooting 
rounds,  I started to get the groove and shot everything. But the 
next  screen I saw was the finish so I had to go on to  the  next 
event.

Slalom

The  next  event  is Slalom skieing.  This event  is  exactly  as 
difficult  as  the downhill race.  The diagonal scroll  that  the 
program uses is very good.  You must slalom your way down between 
the  ports.  This  is a very difficult job  to  do,  because  the 
steering of the joystick is hypersensitive if you steer a  little 
to  the left you are a dead man and if you steer a little to  the 
right  you  are starting to kiss the trees and that is  a  deadly 
kiss.

Bobsled

The  final  event  is the most entertaining  event  this  is  the 
bobsled. I find this sport so exciting because it's a combination 
of  speed  and precision if you make one mistake it can  be  your 
death and the hatched man and his angel of death come to get your 
soul.   At  the  start  you must move  your  joystick  very  fast 
to both sides to make speed.  If the speed of 24 is reached,  the 
two men climb inside the bob and start the race.  If you reach  a 
curve,  you must steer to the opposite side of that curve. If you 
don't do this,  your bob goes off the track and that's the end of 
the  race.  If  you're going too fast you can use  the  brake  by 
pressing the button on your control stick. On the main screen you 
can see the the 3D view of the track.  In the upper right  corner 
you see a map of the track.

If you have played all the events, the computer will tell you who 
is the best overall player.

Conclusion:

The  game is well programmed.  The music is good,  but if you  go 
from  one event to the other,  the intro music comes  back  every 
time  - this is very aggravating.  The graphics are  well  drawn, 
too.  The  program  is a good rival of the  programs  like  Epyx' 
"World Games" and "Winter Games".

P.S.  The  game  comes with a contest with which you  can  win  a 
Winter Olympics holiday in the aforementioned city.  You have  to 
be kinda quick, though, since Calgary started several days ago...
Game Rating:

Name:                         Winter Olympiad '88
Company:                      Tynesoft
Graphics:                     8
Sound:                        8
Playability:                  7
Hookability:                  7
Value for Money:              7.5
Price:                        69.50 Dutch Guilders
Overall Rating:               7.5

Thanks to Mr. Harry van Horen (Homesoft) for the review copy.

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.