Skip to main content
© Dirk 'Nod of Level 16' Pelz

Programming GfA: SimpleGrep by Stefan Posthuma

Maybe  it  is  time  to  start  a  new  series.  A  series  about 
programming.  Now  this  won't  be another  'GfA  for  beginners' 
course, because they can be found in every piece of ST literature 
that  flood the market.  This will be more of a series  in  which 
every time we focus on a certain program.  These programs are not 
intended  to  be  useful,  very userfriendly  or  in  other  ways 
valuable.  They are just ment to cover the topics I talk about in 
the article.  I assume that you have a good working knowledge  of 
GfA. I will use things like Varptrs, Gemdos, Xbios and Bios calls 
without hesitation.
The  program  itself  (the source that is) can be  found  in  the 
PROGRAMS folder on this disk.

This  time  it  will be a very,  very simple  version  of  'grep' 
utility  that  can  be  found on  UNIX  and  UNIX-like  operating 
systems. Grep is a program that searches files for the occurrence 
of a regular expression and prints the filname and the linenumber 
in  case it finds the specified regular expression.  In case  you 
don't know what a regular expression is,  this is a search string 
which can contain special characters which will instruct grep how 
to  search  the  line.   It  can  roughly  be  compared  to   the 
fileselector.  If you enter *.DOC, all filenames ending with .DOC 
will be listed.  In this case,  '*.DOC' is a regular  expression. 
But  a  real regular expression can be  much  more  complex.  For 
instance, the regular expression '^[0-9][0-9] *[Ss]T' will search 
for  a line beginning with two digits,  followed by zero or  more 
spaces  and  the word 'ST' in which the S can be upper  or  lower 
case.  In our grep, forget about regular expressions and stick to 
simple search strings. (UNIX experts...this is fgrep!)

In order to make grep as flexible as possible, we want to make it 
a  Tos Takes Parameters (.TTP) application.  Whenever you  run  a 
.TTP program,  a dialogue box appears prompting you for a command 
line.  This  command line contains certain values which  will  be 
passed to the program.  Our little grep program needs to know two 
things:  which files to search through and what to search for. So 
on  our command line,  we have to enter a filename and  a  search 
string.  It  would  be nice if the output could be  sent  to  the 
printer. So we have to give another parameter which tells grep to 
send  the output to the printer instead of displaying it  on  the 
screen.  We'll  call this the -p option.  So a command line  like 
this:
*.C hello -p
will  search through all .C files (C-sources) for the  occurrence 
of the string 'hello' and will print the filename, the linenumber 
and the line itself if it finds 'hello'.  (On the  printer.  Omit 
the -p option, and it will be displayed on the screen).

Let's grab the GfA interpreter and start programming...

The first thing we want our program to do is to read the  command 
line  and see if it understands it.  To do this you need to  know 
that the command line is stored at the adress Basepage+129 and is 
127  bytes long.  So the only thing we have to do is to create  a 
string,  let's say C$ of 128 bytes long and transfer the  command 
line to it:

C$=space$(127)
Bmove Basepage+129,Varptr(C$),127

The  Bmove command moves bytes from one adress  to  another.  The 
first adress is where to move from, the second adress is where to 
move  to and the third value is the number of bytes to be  moved. 
We had to use the statement C$=Space$(127) first to allocate  127 
bytes of memory for C$.  If we did not do this,  the Varptr of C$ 
would have been 0 and the Bmove command would have resulted in  a 
bus error (2 bombs).
Now the command line is happily residing in C$,  ready for us  to 
be taken apart!

First we have to extract to strings from it, the filename and the 
search string. Before that, we have to strip all trailing spaces, 
newlines and other rubbish:

While Asc(Right$(C$))<=32
   C$=Left$(C$,Len(C$)-1)
Wend

Now  we  have  to find the first string (I  call  it  a  word,  a 
sequence of characters delimited by spaces)

Gosub Findword(1)

Procedure Findword(P%)
   Pos1%=P%
   While Mid$(C$,Pos1%,1)=" " And Pos1%<=Len(C$)
      Inc Pos1%
   Wend
   Pos2%=Pos1%
   While Mid$(C$,Pos2%,1)<>" " And Pos2%<=Len(C$)
      Inc Pos2%
   Wend
Return

Pos1% points to the beginning of the word and Pos2% points to the 
end of the word + 1.
Now get the filename:

Filename$=Mid$(C$,Pos1%,Pos2%-Pos1%)

Now get the second word, the search string:

Gosub Findword(Pos2%)
Search$=Mid$(C$,Pos1%,Pos2%-Pos1%)

If there is a third argument (the -p option), read it:

If Pos2%<=Len(C$)
   Gosub Findword(Pos2%)
   Opt$=Mid$(C$,Pos1%,Pos2%-Pos1%)
   If Opt$<>"-p"
      Print "Grep: unknown option ";Opt$
      Gosub The_end
   Else
      While Gemdos(17)=0  ! printer ready?
         Print "Grep: printer not ready .. Abort Retry Ignore?"
         Repeat
            K$=Upper$(Inkey$)
         Until K$="A" Or K$="R" Or K$="I"
         Exit If K$="A" Or K$="I"
      Wend
      If K$="A"
         Gosub The_end
      Endif
      Prt%=1
   Endif
Else
   Prt%=0
Endif

The  The_end  routine will ask the user to press a key  and  will 
exit the program, back to the desktop.
Now we have extracted the nessaray data from the command line, it 
is time to call our actual grep program:

Gosub Grep(Filename$, Search$, Prt%)

The first thing we have to do is to extract the possible pathname 
from the filename.  Later on we use this path to open the  files. 
Knowing that directory names will be separated by '\' characters, 
we can construct the following routine:

Path$=""
X%=Instr(Filename$,"\")
While X%<>0
   Path$=Left$(Filename$,X%)
   Inc X%
   If X%>Len(Filename$)
      Print "Grep: incorrect filename specification."
      Gosub The_end
   Endif
   X%=Instr(Filename$,"\")
Wend

Now  we  have to search all files that correspond  to  the  given 
filename.  If  you entered '*.C',  all files with the  extenstion 
'.C'  have  to be examined.  Fortunately there are  Gemdos  calls 
which can take care of this.  But before we can use them, we have 
to  determine the Disk Transfer Adress.  This is the adress of  a 
44-byte  buffer which will be used by the  aforementioned  Gemdos 
calls to pass information to our program.  It will contain things 
like filename, size, date etc. This must be a fixed adress and is 
not allowed to change.  So we can't allocate a 44-byte string and 
pass  its Varptr to the Set DTA routine,  because GfA  will  move 
strings around memory while string-processing,  and the Varptr of 
the  44-byte string will change while Gemdos still uses  the  old 
adress we gave it, which usually results in a mess. So we have to 
get a fixed adress.

Memory Management: assigning buffers and stuff

The  answer is simple,  and will satisfy the needs for a  lot  of 
buffer-purposes which need fixed adresses.  When a GfA program is 
run,  it  claims all available memory.  Most programs don't  need 
700-plus K of storage (on a 1040 or Mega).  So we can drastically 
reduce  this amount with the Reserve command.  Now if you  are  a 
good programmer (and we all are,  aren't we) you can make a  good 
guess of how many bytes your program is going to use.  This  grep 
program won't need more than 1000 bytes,  so a Reserve 1000  will 
do the job. But what the heck, plenty of memory, and to make sure 
nothing  will go wrong (we all want to write  bug-free  programs, 
don't we?) we'll make that 5000. Boy, on the commodore 64 (waves 
of  sentiment are now disturbing the calm seas of thought I  just 
had)  I  struggled to save yet another 100 bytes and  here  I  am 
sacrificing 4000 bytes like it is nothing! Times have changed....
But  let's  get  back  to the  point.  Five  thousand  bytes  are 
allocated and the remaining 695000 are released and never touched 
again by GfA.  Now there is a nice system-variable (A GfA  system 
variable  that is) called Himem.  This contains the  last  adress 
used by GfA.  All adresses beyond this value are free.  But there 
is one trap here:  the fileselector.  There are some pretty weird 
things going on here.  Since GfA does not treat GEM with  respect 
and the fileselector is a typical GEM object, the two will clash. 
When the fileselector is closed,  an ugly grey spot will  remain. 
This   is  the  underlying  desktop  which  quickly   grabs   the 
opportunity  to exhibit itself.  GfA swiftly covers it  with  the 
part of the screen it saved before calling the fileselector,  but 
you'll  notice  it.  The memory used to store this  part  of  the 
screen  lies  directly behind Himem.  But there  are  differences 
between the compiler and the interpreter here, and if you Reserve 
not  enough  bytes,  the  program will run  correctly  using  the 
interpreter,  but  will crash (out of memory error) when  it  has 
been  compiled.  So use Himem + 4000 to be sure.  After all  this 
smalltalk, let's do some programming:

Reserve 5000
Dta%=Himem+4000
Void Gemdos(&H1A,L:Dta%)

The  Gemdos call will tell the ST where to find the  DTA  buffer. 
Now we will have to inform the ST which files to search for,  and 
what  their  attributes should be.  A file attribute is  a  value 
telling what kind of file we are dealing with. For our Grep, only 
the value 0 (normal read-write) and 1 (read-only) are  important. 
The following call will do the job:

Gemdos(&H4E,L:Varptr(Filename$),1)

This call will return a value, and a value of 0 will tell us that 
at  least one file was found.  The exact name of the file can  be 
found in positions 30 to 43 from the DTA buffer. After processing 
the file, search the next one and see if there are any more files 
to examine with the Gemdos(&H4F) call.  The following routine can 
be used:

Filename$=Filename$+Chr$(0)   ! Gemdos want zeroes behind strings
Empty$=Space$(13)             ! Need it to clean DTA buffer
Bmove Varptr(Empty$),Dta%+30,13  ! clean filename in DTA buffer
If Gemdos(&H4E,L:Varptr(Filename$),1)=0
   Repeat
      N$=String$(14,0)          ! create string for filename
      Bmove Dta%+30,Varptr(N$),13  ! get filename from DTA
      Bmove Varptr(Empty$),Dta%+30,13   ! clean filename in DTA
      Gosub Process(N$)
   Until Gemdos(&H4F)<>0
Else
   Print "Grep: ";Filename$;" not found."
Endif
Gosub The_end

The reason that I clean the filename in the DTA buffer is that  a 
short  filename will not completely overwrite a longer one  which 
was  previously  there.  If this happens,  parts  of  the  longer 
filename  will appear behind the shorter one and this  file  will 
(probably) not be found.

Processing  a file is simply a matter of opening  it,  reading  a 
line,  check if the search string is in the line,  read the  next 
line until the end of the file is reached.

Procedure Process(F$)
   Local A$,Lc%
   Open "I",#1,Path$+F$
   Lc%=0       ! file line counter
   While Not Eof(#1)
      Line Input #1,A$
      If Asc(Inkey$)=27  ! you pressed Escape?
         Close #1
         Gosub The_end
      Endif
      If Instr(Search$,A$)<>0 ! search string there?
         If Prt%=0            ! print or display
            Print N$;" line ";Lc%;":";A$
            Inc Sc%  
            Add Sc%,((Len(A$)-62)/80)+1 ! adjust for longer lines
            If Sc%>23         ! avoid screen-scrolling
               Print "-- more --"; 
               Void Inp(2)
               Print
               Sc%=0
            Endif
          Else
            Lprint N$;" line ";Lc%;":";A$
          Endif
       Endif
      Inc Lc%
   Wend
   Close #1
Return

The  variable Sc% is used to count the number of lines that  have 
been  printed on the screen.  When the screen is  full,  you  can 
press a key and the next screenfull will be shown.

This  concludes  the first little program that has been  used  to 
tell  you a little more about programming the ST.  You should  do 
one more thing and that is to compile the source and save it as a 
.TPP file.
The things that were important here:

- How to read the command line from a TTP program
- How to search files matching wildcards (*.C,  X?.*,  *.*, etc.) 
- How to allocate fixed buffers and other stuff (Reserve, Himem)                   

I have to make one more remark, and that is that the command line 
buffer is always there. So if your program (even if it is a .PRG) 
is called by another program which also supplies a command  line, 
you  can  read and use it in the same way.  If you  for  instance 
write an editor,  always read the command line,  so if a  program 
like a C-shell calls your editor with a command line, your editor 
will immediately read in and display that file.

Keep programming the ST, and when you have written a program that 
might  be useful to other people and you feel like writing  about 
it,  do not hesitate to send it to our correspondence adress.  It 
is  great to have your program and article published in a  world-
wide magazine, so start programming right away!

Greetings,

Stefan Posthuma.

Phew!

My fingers are tired. I typed in all this in one go. My throat is 
signalling  symptoms of extreme dryness and my stomach  could  do 
with  some  crispy-chips.  I  will do  downstairs  and  raid  the 
freezer. Yeah.

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.