Skip to main content
© Erik 'Es of TEX' Simon

THE ST'S VIRUS PART... (I FORGOT WHICH - WASN'T IT VII?)
by Richard Karsmakers

 This issue of ST NEWS is terribly late. Apart from the fact that 
I   had  to  begin  studying  at  Utrecht   University   (moving, 
studying,  RAGGING!)  and  that Stefan had the sudden  and  heavy 
urge  to  visit the United States for  several  weeks,  this  was 
mainly  caused  by  an  incredible  boom  in  "Virus  Destruction 
Utility"  sales.  The  new and even more  versatile  version  3.2 
succeeded  in breaking even my highest hopes and sold  over  1000 
units  (when taking into account that every single one  of  those 
was produced, distributed and filed by yours truly, this explains 
some  of  the ST NEWS delay...)!  At the  moment,  the  "VDU"  is 
happily  used  by hundreds of people in  Holland,  West  Germany, 
Hungary,  England,  Belgium, Luxemburg, France, China, Australia, 
the United States and Sweden.

 Now....what is all the fuss about this new "VDU" version?  Allow 
me  to  go  through the main specifications  and  update  changes 
systematically.

*  12 Viruses (of which 2 are link viruses) are recognized  (also 
when already present in the system). Well over 100 innocent disks 
are  also  detectable,  whereas  over 70 of  those  can  also  be 
repaired.

* A new option has been introduced:  The possibility to write  an 
Anti-Virus after a disk has been repaired.  This Anti-Virus, once 
installed  in  your system (much  like  a  Virus),  automatically 
detects  executable disks and warns the user when one  is  found. 
When no executable disk is found,  it copies itself onto it. Some 
caution  is needed when working with MS-DOS disks,  that are  not 
found to be executable as far as TOS is concerned...

* When a suspected disk is encountered (containing either a Virus 
or a harmless bootsector program/loader),  one can now also write 
a  so-called boot-file.  This means that the bootsector  data  is 
written  onto a small file,  so that only that file needs  to  be 
sent  to  me and not the whole suspected disk or a copy  of  that 
whole disk.

*  The  Drive C/D bug is removed (though a fraction of  it  still 
appears  to be left,  which will of course be removed in  version 
3.3).  All  other  bugs were removed and  some  code  drastically 
reprogrammed.

* The program is now MUCH more compact.  All 'Repair' data  files 
are  stored in a data file instead of in data lines in the  basic 
source code.  This saves about 66% storage  space.  Overall,  the 
program  only  shrank  a  little,  due  to  enormous  recognition 
expansion.

*  When  a  suspected disk  is  encountered,  the  program  semi-
intelligently  calculates a so-called "Virus Probability  Factor" 
(VPF).  It hereby monitors a bootsector's machine code and checks 
for  typical  virus  characteristics.  Theoretically,  about  all 
unknown bootsector viruses can be detected this way.

*  A  German manual is now included on the disk  right  from  the 
beginning (as well as a Dutch and English manual).

* The 'Display License Number' option has been removed.  A  user-
specific  number  is  now  coded  onto  the  program  using  some 
techniques  that will make it virtually impossible to  find  them 
(let alone change them).

* All time-consuming code was optimized.  This can result in time 
savings  of up to 1000% (especially when  repairing  disks).  The 
user interface has been slightly enhanced,  and  userfriendlyness 
increased.

 This new "Virus Destruction Utility" is of course still sold  at 
the same,  rather LOW,  price.  The update service remains valid, 
and  people that send unknown viruses to me get a FREE  copy  (or 
update, when they already have one).

TABLE OF PRICES FOR THE "VIRUS DESTRUCTION UTILITY" V3.0 AND UP

-----------------------------------------------------------------
Country:             Purchase amount:     Update amount:
-----------------------------------------------------------------

Netherlands               19.95               10.--
United Kingdom             6.95                4.--
United States of A.    $   11.95            $    7.--
Belgium               Bfr 395.--           Bfr 200.--
France                 Fr  64.95            Fr  30.--
Germany                DM  18.95            DM  10.--
Italy                  L 1395.--            L  700.--
Canada                 $   13.95            $    8.--
New Zealand            $   16.95            $    9.--
Sweden                 Kr  64.95            Kr  35.--
Norway                 Kr  68.95            Kr  37.--
Greece                 D 1495.--            D  800.--
Austria               Sch 129.95           Sch  65.--
Switzerland            Fr  14.95            Fr   8.--
Denmark               Dkr  69.95           Dkr  35.--

 If payed in cash, please only use paper money - NO COINS!!

 Note:  If using foreign cheques, add 50% to the purchase  amount
or 75% to the update amount (to cover cheque cashing costs).

  The money should be transferred to giro account number  5060326 
of Richard Karsmakers,  Utrecht, The Netherlands (Bank: Postbank, 
Arnhem. No more specs needed), and cheques should be made payable 
to the same.

The known viruses

 Many (MANY!) people request information about viruses.  Since it 
is quite impossible to do that for all those individuals,  I will 
hereby  supply you with a neat list of viruses that are known  to 
me (and recognized, of course, by the "VDU" version 3.2).

SIGNUM (bootvirus)

History: 
 There it is again...the good old "Signum" virus,  the virus that 
had  the  dubious honour of being 'the  first',  the  virus  that 
frightened  us  all,  the virus that turned out not  to  be  that 
harmful  after  all.  Rumours  go that it waits  for  an  illegal 
version  of  "Aladin" to come by,  which it  will  then  destroy. 
Hence,  it  is  also said that it was in fact  developed  by  the 
people  that made "Aladin":  Proficomp.  Nothing is certain  with 
regard  to this,  however!  Its name is derived from the  alleged 
fact  that  it was first found on Application  Systems'  "Signum" 
advanced word processing package.  Nothing is quite certain  with 
regard  to  this,  either.  I decided to call it  "Signum"  virus 
because   this  was  already  done  earlier  by  the  author   of 
"Antibiotikum" (a Public Domain viruskiller).  I found it on  the 
22nd  of  November 1987,  but I must have had it  maybe  a  month 
before.
Symptoms: 
 No symptoms yet known,  as this virus is only the key to a virus 
that still appears unknown and that still has to be written. Once 
written,  this can have an enormous variety of effects.  The  key 
section (the current "Signum" virus) can only destroy bootsectors 
of boot-loading programs (that will then be unfunctionable).

MAD (bootvirus)

History:  
  This  virus is one of the more harmless (and  also  potentially 
harmless)  viruses,  discovered  on March 16th  1988  after  Eerk 
Hofmeester  of  STRIKE-a-LIGHT  sent  me  a  disk  he  suspected. 
Unfortunately,  this virus seems to have been used as a basis for 
three or four other bootsector viruses.
Symptoms: 
 After having been installed in the system, the virus waits until 
it  has been multiplied to another disk for five times.  When  it 
has,  it  will randomly execute some routines,  which  include  a 
'screen flip',  a 'beep sound' and a color change routine,  or  a 
combination  of these.  It does not destroy any data on the  disk 
except for data present on the bootsector to which it was copied.

MAULWURF I (bootvirus)

History: 
 While writing the "VDU" version 3.2,  someone sent this virus to 
me  (the person's name,  I am afraid,  seems to have  slipped  my 
mind).  Anyway, the discovery date is set to September 3rd, 1988. 
It was designed by the Subversive Software Group (SSG), seemingly 
a German hack group (a bunch of mothers if you ask me!).
Symptoms: 
  When  the  virus gets activated,  it locks up  your  system  by 
displaying a message on the screen (name of the virus and name of 
the author) and copying a part of the Operating System to  $10000 
hexadecimal.

BHP (bootvirus)

History:  
  Mr.  Tarik  Ahmia of 68000'er/ST Magazin sent me  a  new  virus 
killer program called "Sagrotan",  which contained some  complete 
viruses in its recognition database (not really smart, guys! If I 
can rip 'em out,  others can do so,  too!).  One of those was the 
BHP Virus (BHP stands for Bayerischer Hacker Post).  The BHP is a 
more  or  less  legal  usergroup  in  Germany,   that  originally 
announced this virus over half a year ago. It was said to be able 
to ignore the write-protect notch and to be reset-resistant. None 
of this seems to be true.  Anyway, my discovery date is September 
10th 1988.
Symptoms: 
  The virus only seems to copy itself,  and doesn't appear to  do 
anything else.

LABORATORY (Bootvirus)

History: 
   This  virus  I  also  obtained  by  taking  it  out   of   the 
aforementioned  "Sagrotan" virus killer.  Its discovery  date  is 
thus  set  to September 10th as well.  According  to  that  virus 
killer, this was a "Lab-virus fur Testzwecken", and this leads me 
to  the conclusion that they wrote it themselves.  I'm  not  sure 
about this, though.
Symptoms: 
  Due  to the enormous heaps of work I've had to  do  (with  some 
studying along the line),  I have not yet been able to check  the 
symptoms  out.  Most important is that it can be  recognized  and 
destroyed  using the "VDU" (but then,  you hadn't a  doubt  about 
that, or had you?).

FREEZE (Bootvirus)

History: 
 This is one of the adapted MAD virus versions I meant earlier. I 
received it on July 12th 1988, and this was done by the author of 
the German PD viruskiller "Antibiotikum", Carsten Frischkorn.
Symptoms: 
  I am afraid I'm not quite sure about what triggers  the  thing, 
but  when it actually gets triggered,  it hangs up the system  so 
that  nothing can move anymore.  Your system has to be reset  (or 
maybe  even turned off/on) to function properly  again.  This  is 
thus  quite harmless for actual disk data (except for  things  in 
the bootsector),  but quite lethal for files currently in  memory 
(especially  large databanks or text files that you had  not  yet 
written to disk).

SCREEN (Bootvirus)

History: 
 This virus was also sent to me by Carsten Frischkorn,  and  thus 
its  discovery date (as far as I am concerned,  that is) is  July 
12th 1988 as well. It is COMPLETELY HARMLESS if you do not have a 
German  pre-Blitter TOS machine - it doesn't even bother to  copy 
itself in those cases!
Symptoms: 
 No known symptoms,  as this virus accesses OS addresses and I do 
not have that particular OS in my system.

ACA (Bootvirus)

History: 
 On June 29th 1988,  I received one of the first REALLY DANGEROUS 
bootsector  viruses:  The ACA virus (sometimes also called  OMEGA 
virus).  It was sent to me by someone calling himself Little  Joe 
(hi  again!),  and  it appears to have been  written  by  someone 
calling himself Omega from The ACA crew.  The telephone number of 
this   guy  is  (Sweden)  0300/63350.   This  lunatic  was   also 
interviewed in 68000'er/ST Magazine number 9/88. A more dangerous 
virus  is  said to be ready (including write-protect  ignore  and 
stuff like that),  but that do not launch it for obvious  reasons 
(then, why did they spread the first?!).
Symptoms: 
 The ACA guys, in the interview, claim that the virus is harmless 
and  only copies itself.  Well,  I've had a look at  it,  and  my 
opinion  is that the virus does not only copy  itself,  but  also 
clears  all of track 0 (FAT and directory as well as  bootsector) 
when  it finds it's already present on a  disk.  Dangerous,  this 
one!

C'T (Bootvirus)

History: 
 Somewhere in the summer of this year,  I found out how an  other 
virus killer recognized this virus,  so I could include it in the 
"VDU"  as well.  I have never has 'the honour' of getting a  full 
version,  though. What I DID get, was an article published in the 
"C'T"  magazine  (yes,  THEM again!!) that  featured  this  virus 
practically  as  a type-in-listing!  The author  of  the  article 
claims to have found the virus on one of his disks,  and  decided 
to write an article about it.  If you ask me (since the virus has 
never ever been seen elsewhere),  this stinks like High Heaven! I 
don't believe his claim (even worse:  I strongly disbelieve it!). 
Well,  those  "C'T" guys have done worse before  (publishing  the 
"Milzbrand" linkvirus as an easy and convenient type-in-listing), 
so I would't in the least be surprised.
Symptoms: 
 I don't know much about this,  as I have not really looked  into 
the  listing  deep.   It  seems  to  be  reset-proof  due  to  an 
undocumented  TOS features,  and can copy itself to  harddisk  as 
well using a random (undocumented) value of certain parameters in 
the 'rwabs' BIOS function.

MILZBRAND (Linkvirus)

History: 
  The first known link-virus was "Milzbrand",  published  in  the 
German  computermagazine "Computer & Technik" Heft 4 as  type-in-
listing  (!).  Author  is Eckhard Krabel  from  Germany.  It  was 
published as a type-in-listing that even the biggest nutcakes can 
adapt to their own specific (no doubt EVIL) uses.  Krabel was  so 
free  as  to supply an Anti-virus,  too,  which can  be  just  as 
harmful to your programs (NEVER use it!).
Symptoms: 
  The  original virus checks the date stamp - when  it's  set  to 
1987,  the disk's bootsector and FAT are cleared and the info  on 
the disk is unreadable after that.  In the bootsector, it writes: 
"Dies ist ein Virus!" (German for "This is a Virus!").  But,  due 
to  the type-in-character of the virus,  anyone can change  these 
symptoms.

VCS (Linkvirus)

Read  all  about this terrible computer freaks's nightmare  in  a 
full review of this program, elsewhere in ST NEWS.

A "new" Virus Killer

 I was quite amused when I recently obtained a 'new' virus killer 
from Sweden,  called "Doctorin' the House". It was a virus killer 
in which samples were used (applause when no virus  found,  stuff 
like  that) as well as graphics.  Great was my surprise  when  it 
turned out to be nothing less than an upgraded version of my  old 
Public Domain (versions 2.x) "VDU" program!  The author,  An Cool 
(don't know if that's his real name or not),  made it very  nice. 
Only  now,  it's  about  twenty times as large  as  the  original 
version...

Hilfe!   Die  Viren  kommen!   -  A  publication  on  the  "Virus 
Destruction Utility"


 Through the guys of The Exceptions (hi,  Erik!) that were at the 
time writing their first articles for 68000'er/ST Magazin,  I was 
brought  into contact with the mag's chief editor,  Tarik  Ahmia. 
Soon,  the  question  arose whether or not I  was  interested  in 
writing  an article for him with regard to viruses on  the  Atari 
ST.  Of course, I agreed (my ego won over my modesty - as usual). 
So,  in issue 9/88,  a four-page long feature article appeared in 
the magazine, together with some splendid advertisements and even 
third-party adds (thanks, CCD Eltville! I am sending a free "VDU" 
copy to you soon!). That was the main reason why I have sold over 
800 copies in Germany alone,  and another 100 in Switzerland  and 
Austria.  I  am  proud  to say that I  have  received  very  many 
positive  reactions  to the article,  and that really  lifted  my 
heart. Thanks to all of you that reacted so nicely, and of course 
especially those that also bought my "VDU"!  You have taken  care 
that I can now live reasonably in Utrecht,  where life is ghastly 
expensive for a first-year's Biology student,  torn away from the 
financial  support  of  his parents as well  as  the  safety  and 
protectiveness that used to be present there.

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.