Skip to main content
© Dave 'Spaz of TLB' Moss

Anywhere I roam
Where I lay my head is home
Carved upon my stone
My body lie, but still I roam
Wherever I may roam
                                "Wherever I may roam" - Metallica

                       J O U R N A L Y N X

                        VOLUME 2 ISSUE 1

            The thrilling Submagazine for Lynx Owners

                      by Richard Karsmakers

Editorial

 Welcome  back to this first issue of the new  year.  Last  year,
releases for our dear little Lynx have been a bit rare,  with  an
enormous gap after the first couple of games, that were available
in January 1990,  and the later ones. But the last months of 1990
have  witnessed  the  start  of  quite  some  new  titles   being
released.
 Will the Lynx yet show some battle for  existence?  Maybe,  this
is  a sign of Atari having started a new offensive or  something,
since they also recently lowered the price of the Lynx.  Although
the  'twenty'  titles they promised to be available in  1990  are
too  late,  they are surely getting there  now.  Overall  quality
seems to be very good indeed.
 Let's  hope  that  the "Lynx II" (which I  wrote  about  in  the
previous  "JournaLYNX"  issue,  and which is  a  "Gameboy"  style
version  of  the  machine - read more about  it  below)  will  be
available  soon,  and  let's  hope that  especially  its  battery
consumption  has  been  lowered (maybe by allowing  the  user  to
switch  off  the backlighting of the LCD display).  A  price  has
already been announced for it: $99. Let's hope this will actually
happen.
 Anyway,  the  Lynx surely still has to be reckoned with  -  even
though the "Gameboy" outsells it...

The underdog position

 It seems like Atari is the eternal underdog,  no matter how much
fanatic Atari freaks tell you it's not so.
 It started off with the 8-bit Atari XL series.  In England, they
were outsold by the Sinclair Spectrum,  whereas on the  continent
the  Commodore  64 beat it.  There was a large Atari  user  base,
though,  and  these  users  had a different  mentality  from  the
'others'.
 Luckily,  when the ST got launched,  the mentality did't  change
even though the only competing machine (the Commodore Amiga)  was
clearly the underdog.  The ST thrived.  People were enthusiastic,
and soon everything was known about the machine.
 One  would  almost  have started to think that  Atari  would  no
longer  be  the eternal underdog,  yet by the end of  1990  Amiga
sales  had  boosted  significantly  and the  ST  is  probably  an
underdog now as we speak.
 An underdog again.
 But do we care?
 Hell we don't!
 Anyway, the Lynx is yet another Atari underdog. Even though it's
principally  better  than  the Gameboy (apart from  a  couple  of
technical specs,  the ST is also better than the Amiga), some way
or another it doesn't sell as well as it should.
 The  reason  behind this is the fact that the Lynx  is  made  by
Atari  and not by Sega or Nintendo.  These two  latter  companies
have   money  like  water,   and  Atari's  $1,000,000  spent   on
advertisements  are  peanuts  against  the  billions  of  dollars
Nintendo  and  Sega  spend  yearly  on  trivial  things  such  as
lawsuits.
 Atari  simply  doesn't have the dough,  and  penetrating  a  new
market is difficult if that's the case.
 So what should we do against this?
 Buy  a Lynx and a Gameboy,  especially once a $99 Lynx  will  be
available!

 But let us not philosophise to much. It's review time!

Roadblasters
1 PLAYER

 A bit of a letdown,  this game,  if you ask me. The expectations
were  highest  of  all,  as it was rumoured to be  a  1:1  arcade
version, with digital speech and the whole shebang.
 "Roadblasters"  is actually a repetitive  shoot-'em-up  "Outrun"
lookalike.  Although  it is technically very well done  (although
the digital speech is of bad quality),  it is just not a game you
come  back  to  play  and  play.  Action  is,  as  stated  above,
repetitive.  Some  of the enemies are unfairly difficult and  you
die loads of times, each time losing your extra weapons.
 It's smooth, it's fast. I may be a bad player but the repetitive
action stays (I came quite a long way with the continues until  I
actually lost interest).
 Rating: 6.

Ms. Pacman
1 PLAYER

 This  game is identical to the standard "Pacman" games  like  we
all  know  them from 8-bit times.  The playability has  not  lost
anything  in  the  conversion  process,   but  it  hasn't  gained
anything,  either.  The graphics are typical 8-bit, and so is the
sound.
 "Ms. Pacman" may be quite nice, or even nostalgic, but it surely
ain't worth getting a Lynx for - nor is it worth shelling out the
80 German marks it costs.
 Not all too good.
 Rating: 5.

Xenophobe
1 PLAYER

 It would hardly be fair to judge this game as I have played with
it  only for a couple of minutes and then decided I  didn't  like
it. The colours are too primary, the action is too repetitive and
the sound effects were even a bit irritating.
 It's  a well known plot:  You have to walk through some kind  of
complex and kill all aliens. If you have done so, you get through
to the next complex. It's horizontal, and you have to shoot while
shaking  off  certain aliens that attach themselves  to  you  and
drain your energy.
 Not my cuppa tea. Maybe yours. Check before you buy.

Klax
1 PLAYER

 The  game with the best sound so far on the  Lynx,  without  the
shadow of a doubt,  is "Klax".  This is a straight port from  the
arcade version,  and it hasn't lost anything along the  way.  The
graphics are identical,  the sound is identical (and  VERY,  VERY
good),  and  the playability is identical as well (including  the
built-in hints and 'tutorial').
 Everybody knows "Klax",  of course.  If you don't:  You have  to
stack  as  many same-coloured stones on rows -  either  vertical,
horizontal  or  diagonal,  and  the rows have to be  as  long  as
possible.  The learning curve is quite steep and the  playability
is very good.
 This is a really brilliant game.
 Rating: 9.

Zarlor Mercenary
1-4 PLAYERS

 After  "Gates  of Zendocon",  "Zarlor Mercenary"  is  the  first
shoot-'em-up on the Lynx.  This time,  it's purely vertical,  and
this time it's for up to four 4 players.
 First  impression of this game:  It's bloody difficult.  If  you
play it on your own,  there is no way to destroy everything  that
is coming towards you,  and I therefore think this game has  been
designed  too much with the multi-player modes in  thought.  Very
nice if you have a couple of friends with Lynxes,  but  otherwise
it ain't.
 The graphics are of good quality, and it's nice to note that all
shapes  have  a shadow on the ground as well.  It's an  OK  game,
generally,  though  not  very  original nor  altogether  all  too
playable.
 Rating: 7.

Robosquash
1-2 PLAYERS

 Quite a difficult game, this one.
 Imagine a cube,  with you on one side in it and your opponent on
the other.  You have a bat that you can see through,  and so does
your opponent.  Now you have to play 'tennis' in 3D,  making sure
that the ball doesn't get missed (missing it causes a big  splash
to occur,  which obscures sight in a terrible way).  Between  the
two  of you,  there are bonus objects and balls you have to  hit.
The balls earn points,  and the bonus objects allow you to shoot,
or foretell where the ball's going to hit, etc.
 A  pretty straightforward game,  that is quite a bit of  fun  to
play.  Although I can't definitely judge (as I haven't gone far -
it's  quite difficult,  remember?) it seems it but dull  on  long
term.
 Rating: 7.

Rygar
1 PLAYER

 Of  the new Lynx releases,  I find myself playing "Rygar"  most.
It's  a  beat-'em-up where you find yourself  walking  through  a
horizontally scrolling playfield filled with minor obstacles  and
monsters. Sometimes, it also scrolls vertically. The principle if
well known,  of course,  and "Rygar" is one of the better of  the
kind.  The  graphics keep on changing and this really  makes  the
game more appealing.  You will find a new ingredient on virtually
every  level and that's the stuff that tends to get  people  back
for more.
 The sound effects and music are below average.  The graphics are
good and gameplay well designed.
 Rating: 8.5.

Shanghai
1-2 PLAYERS

 Some  games should be converted to the Lynx and some  shouldn't.
"Bubble  Bobble"  is one that should and "Shanghai" is  one  that
shouldn't.   Unfortunately,   the  Gods  of  software  have  been
merciless:  They didn't give us "Bubble Bobble" but did supply us
with "Shanghai".
 "Shanghai" is a well known board game,  where you have to  match
tiles  together.  The  principle is already  known  from  various
systems  including the ST.  It's a very well designed  game,  and
it's a whole lot of fun to play,  too, especially with two people
in 'match' mode.
 Unfortunately, the screen of the Lynx is a lot too small for the
complex  figures and enormous amounts of stones that have  to  be
visible in a game the likes of "Shanghai".  I found it  virtually
impossible  to  play,  as the tiles are only partly  drawn  which
makes them very hard to match. This is just the kind of game that
one should not try to convert.  Sorry. Good concept but the wrong
display.
 Rating: 4.

Chess
1 PLAYER

 I shall be frank:  I haven't even seen this game.  But as it  is
out  (a  review appeared in "Zero") I suspect I should  cover  it
here, too.
 What the heck, actually. There is not much to say. It got an 8.5
rating there, and...well...it's chess (the first chess on a hand-
held,  so "Zero" stated - though "Chessmaster 2000" is  available
on the Gameboy already).

Rampage
1-4 PLAYERS

 In  "Rampage" you play the role of a baddie that has to  destroy
buildings  in dozens of cities (levels).  You can be one of  four
mutant  beasties that have escaped from some kind  of  laboratory
where they apparently got the wrong steroids.
 You have to climb the buildings and smash them with your  fists,
making them crumble together.  Unfortunately, there's some people
walking  around  that want to prevent you from  doing  so:  Lotsa
soldiers,  to be more precise.  They can either blow the building
you're destroying,  or come at ya in helicopters,  shooting. They
can also be seen hanging from windows, shooting.
 Of course,  there's bonus objects as well.  Innocent  civilians,
for  example,  can  be grabbed from their windows and  taken  for
breakfast. Yum yum.
 The concept is as old as God-knows-what, but it's good. I played
the ST version a lot as well. The Lynx version can be played with
up  to  4 people at the same time,  and I suppose that can  be  a
whole lot of fun even though I couldn't try it myself. It's quite
difficult, but very playable (and enjoyable).
 Rating: 8.

New stuff

 In the previous issue of "JournaLYNX",  I summed up quite a  lot
of  Lynx titles that were 'for sale' at a French  company  called
"Micro  Mania".  I would like to bet my life that these  are  not
available  at the time they send their advertisements  to  print,
but at least they seem to have a hot lead somewhere as they  seem
to  foretell  the  future  with  regard  to  Lynx  releases  very
accurately.
 Their  latest  titles 'for sale'  include:  "Warbirds"*  (a  WWI
flight  sim-like thing),  "Vindicators",  "World  Class  Soccer",
"Tournament Cyberball 2072", "720 degrees", "Ninja Gaiden"*, "NFL
Superbowl  Football"*,  "Grid Runner",  "Turbo  Sub",  "Scrapyard
Dog"*,  "Baseball",  "Iron  Sports  Hockey",  "Checkered  Flag"*,
"Pinball   Shuffle",   "Block  Out"*,   "All  Star   Basketball",
"Pacland"*,  "STUN Runner"*, "Lynx Casino"*, "Xybots"*, "A.P.B."*
(a  racing game) and "Viking Child"*.  The rumours  around  "Hard
Drivin'" have been lifted, too: This game will be released on the
Lynx.  "Paperboy" is already sold but I just didn't see it myself
yet  (I  only  saw it in the shops).  Other  games  due  out  are
"Leaderboard" and "Basketbrawl".
 The CES Show in Las Vegas (January this year) showed some of the
above  titles  as well (the ones I marked with an  asterisk  have
been  seen on screenshots).  There,  Atari also showed  the  Lynx
II...

Lynx II - Part Two

 I  already mentioned the forthcoming release of the Lynx  II  in
the  previous issue of "JournaLYNX".  But at the CES,  an  actual
prototype was shown that looked, to say the least, very slick.
 The Lynx II is not as small as the Gameboy,  but smaller than it
was before.  It is about three times as wide as the length of its
screen,  and  about  twice  as high as  a  screen's  height.  The
function buttons,  joypad and fire buttons have remained the same
with  the addition of an extra button to the left of the  screen.
This particular button is labelled 'backlight',  and functions to
turn the backlight on the display on or off.
 Hurray!
 Let's hope it will also need four instead of six batteries...
 But  at least someone at Atari is keeping eyes and ears open  to
feedback  - which can for example not particularly be said  about
the TOS developers...

 And  so we have come to the end of this particular issue of  the
thrilling submagazine for Lynx owners...

No we haven't!!

 I  actually stumbled across a cheat for "California  Games"  and
one for "Ms.Pacman" in the British mag "Zero" (July issue),  that
I  would not like to withhold from you.  I have not been able  to
check  it myself as I sold my old (and busted) Lynx and I  am  at
the moment still waiting for the new one.
 Well. The cheats then.
 "California Games":
 "For a surprise,  try this:  Lose two of your lives,  then  just
stay on your board, wait for the time to run down to about three,
and steer yourself off the bottom of the screen to lose your last
life."
 "Ms. Pacman":
 "Need more lives?  You can swipe five of the devils by  pressing
PAUSE,  OPTION 1, B, B, A, A, OPTION 1, UNPAUSE. If, on the other
hand, you fancy the idea of commandeering a superfast Ms. Pacman,
try this: PAUSE, OPTION 1, A, OPTION 1, UNPAUSE."

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.