Skip to main content
© Jinxter

I'm fearless in my heart
They will always see that in my eyes
I am the Passion
I am the Warfare
I will never stop...
Always constant
       accurate
       intense...
                            Steve Vai "The audience is listening"


             SOFTWARE REVIEW: LEMMINGS BY PSYGNOSIS
   (Including ST
 passwords and some info about real Lemmings)
                      by Richard Karsmakers

 For this story, dear reader, it is needed to venture way back in
history. As a matter of fact, reversely speaking, we will have to
leave  history behind us and explore the times of  'pre-history',
when mankind barely existed - let alone write anything about  the
weird and wonderful things that happened to him.
 It is in this time that we meet a predecessor of modern man, who
we will, for the sake of easy reading, call 'Grønt'.


 "Grønt."
 Grønt  looked up,  awaking at suddenly hearing his  name  called
out,  and  startled when discovering it was his stomach that  had
called.
 He  would  have to make a mental note of this  one  day,  as  it
tended to happen every morning.
 He looked around him and saw the sun rising in the west, deep in
the innards of a huge fjord - only,  of course, he didn't know it
was  a sun that rose there,  let alone that it was a fjord  above
which this phenomenon happened.
 "Grømble."
 He  startled again as his stomach seemed to cry out the name  of
someone he didn't recall ever having met before.  He'd better get
some  food into him soon,  otherwise there was no telling to  who
would all turn up here. Eating always used to shut his stomach up
- until the next morning,  of course,  when it would wake him  up
calling him names again.
 He  walked  towards the yellow orb  in  the  sky,  instinctively
sensing there was likely to be some food in that direction.
 Before  we  continue  with  this  tale,   you  should  know  one
thing: Prehistoric  Man is not easily startled - instead,  he  is
only easily and very sincerely and completely flummoxed.
 So Grønt was quite flummoxed when he looked at an enormous piece
of writing located on one of the fjord cliffs. He gazed at it for
the largest part of the morning,  but couldn't make any sense  of
it at all.
 "Grømpledegrønt!"
 His  stomach was clearly trying to make a point  there,  and  it
quickly  reminded Grønt that he had more to do rather than  stand
aimlessly  around  and  gaze at  the  word  "Slartibartfast"  all
morning.
 He was amazed by the fact that that strange thermonuclear fusion
reaction in the sky had moved so much during his ponderings - but
not  half as amazed as he was by the furry little creatures  that
started  hurling  themselves  down  a  cliff's  face,  connecting
themselves  in  a lethal way to the ground not more  than  thirty
steps ahead of him.
 For  a  moment he stood there,  being  silently,  sincerely  and
utterly flummoxed again.  Then a bright light bulb appeared in  a
small fluffy cloud above his head.
 "Føød!" he cried joyfully.
 At  that precise instant,  a contraption from outer space  tried
to  land  exactly in front of him.  It hovered a  bit  above  the
ground  much  in a way a hesitant spaceship would  do,  and  then
finally touched down.
 A ramp extended itself, from which came a creature walking down.
The creature, so Grønt was kinda truly flummoxed to see, looked a
lot  like  him.   It  had  his  genitals  covered,  however.  How
shockingly rude!
 The creature stepped down towards Grønt, who stood rooted to the
ground  in a rather extremely flummoxed way.  To anyone  familiar
with the words,  the phrase 'insanely witty' could have sprung to
mind.
 "Might  you perhaps be Grønt Eggesbø Abrahamsen?"  the  creature
asked.
 "Grønt?"  Grønt replied,  and started hopping up and down as  if
immensely happy, rolling his eyes and flapping his ears.
 The  creature  nodded,  humming  the middle  segment  of  Yngwie
Malmsteen's "Trilogy Op:5",  and ticked a box on a sheet of paper
he had taken with him from the spaceship.
 Things   were   going  smoothly  for  Wowbagger   II,   son   of
Wowbagger.  Unlike his father,  the Infinitely Prolonged, who had
set  out  to insult the entire universe  in  alphabetical  order,
Wowbagger II,  the Even Less Finitely Prolonged,  had decided  to
insult  all  people  of  all times  in  the  entire  universe  in
alphabetical order.  Quite a formidable task,  one might say, but
as  he  had  immortality in his genes and had  a  CUNTT  (Compact
Universal  Nuclear Time Traveller) at his disposal,  he  reckoned
he was quite capable of doing it.
 He had just started with a new name - Eggesbø Abrahamsen. He had
made a habit of starting with oldest representative of the family
name.  This prehistoric man,  Grønt Eggesbø Abrahamsen,  was  the
first in this case.
 Grønt still hopped up and down as if insanely happy.
 "Nøndeju!"   the   Prehistoric  Man  cried   as   if   something
unbelievably  exciting  was  happening  right  before  his  eyes,
"Nøndeju!"
 Wowbagger  II  didn't  heed the  cries  the  Eggesbø  Abrahamsen
progenitor  uttered.  Instead,  he took out a kind of  calculator
with had, for some strange reason, "DON'T PANIC" written on it in
large, friendly letters.
 He  typed  in the coordinates of the place where he was  at  the
moment, followed by a text.
 "Hmm," he muttered, "they speak Norwegian here."
 As   the  prehistoric  man  looked  unpredictable   enough   for
Wowbagger II to decide that trying to insert a Babel Fish in  the
ancestor's  ear might prove dangerous,  he instead put it in  his
own mouth.
 "Grønt Eggesbø Abrahamsen," Wowbagger II said solemnly,  "you're
a jerk."
 The  Babel Fish instantly translated the voice  into  Norwegian,
but this did not seem to affect the Prehistoric Man.
 Grønt  still hopped up and down in a rather insanely  happy  way
when  Wowbagger  II  ticked another box on the  sheet  of  paper,
turned on his heel, re-inserted the Babel Fish in his own ear and
made  the calculator-like thing disappear in a pouch  hanging  at
his side.
 Then The Even Less Finitely Prolonged suddenly saw  them: Little
creatures  that  hurled themselves from the  nearby  cliff  face,
behind his spaceship.
 "Whattaf..."   Wowbagger  II  uttered,   and  went   closer   to
investigate.
 Even  as  he looked,  more of the little  creatures  smashed  to
ruthless  deaths  on top of their crushed and  splattered  little
buddies.
 At  that instant,  a sense of Purpose coarsed through The  Son's
veins  with  deafening  speed.  He instinctively  felt  that  his
immortality now suddenly had a Reason,  a Purpose beyond purpose.
It  was not to insult the entire universe in  alpha-chronological
order, but...
 TO SAVE THE LEMMINGS!
 It  was as if some divine being had whispered the cause  in  his
ear.  He shuddered.  He shook.  He trembled. He felt himself fill
with  The  Purpose.  Nausea  overtook him  for  the  briefest  of
instants, but he quickly regained control of himself.
 He cleared his throat.
 "STOP!"  he  yelled with a voice so full of Power that  it  made
Grønt stop hopping up and down in that peculiar,  insanely  happy
way.
 The  lemming that was just about to hurl itself down  the  cliff
stopped abruptly, causing the followers to bump into him and turn
around,  back  to their breeding place - where they would  frolic
and f...er...multiply until the end of their days (that is, until
there  were  again too many so that they had to  migrate  into  a
random direction again).
 Wowbagger  II  The Even Less Finitely  Prolonged  looked  around
himself in a decidedly smug way.
 Then he disappeared back into the bowel of his spaceship.  After
a  bit  of hovering above the ground like some kind  of  hesitant
spaceship, it took off to dazzling heights, disappearing.

 Grønt  didn't  really know what to think of all  this.  On  this
particular morning,  he had been confronted by the sun,  a fjord,
hunger,  mysterious inscriptions on a wall,  a spaceship, a space
creature, and free food that came hurtling itself at his feet.
 He knew there had been something important between all of  those
experiences. Something that...
 Ah!
 "Føød!" he growled with a strangely insane look settling on  his
face.
 He dove into the warm pile of lemming corpses, tore furs and dug
his teeth into the warm bellies filled with lemming entrails.

 Grønt  has been known to live happily everafter.  Lucky for  the
Eggesbø  Abrahamsen family - and less luckily for humanity  as  a
whole  -  he  found  a female that  liked  his  peculiar  way  of
sweettalking ("Grønt?  Grønt!  GRØNT!!") so that his name was not
to die out.  Eventually, he was to have a descendant known as The
Minute One.  This particular specimen still looks rather insanely
witty.
 Grønt  Eggesbø  Abrahamsen  died in 999.951 BC  when  he  choked
himself on lemming entrails.


                              *****

Prelude

 Everything  started in the autumn of last year,  when one of  my
colleagues at Thalion Software showed me a demo on the Amiga of a
new  game  made  by UK company Psygnosis.  The  game  was  called
"Lemmings", and he was particularly impressed by it.
 He played a couple of demo levels as I looked,  and it was  then
that I instantly realised that this must be one of the cutest and
most original concepts to appear since years.  And it turned  out
to be pretty damn addictive as well.
 Although  of course I wanted to get my hands on  this  game,  it
kinda got forgotten because Psygnosis took a bit of time to  have
it released on the ST. That was a bit of letdown.
 At  the beginning of this year,  the first previews of the  game
appeared,  unfortunately  only on the Amiga.  The  first  reviews
followed.  The  press was unanimous:  "Lemmings" was a  brilliant
game worth every penny spent on it. It was original, addictive...
Most  magazines  lost themselves in the concoction of  new  words
and phrases to describe how good this game was.
 Not long after that,  the rumour was spread that the ST  version
would be really crap.  It would be done by DMA design,  who  were
supposed not to know how to port it from Amiga to ST properly.  I
was somewhat surprised there,  as DMA design had previously  done
"Menace" and "Blood Money" - especially the latter was craftfully
converted  and  immensely playable as far as I was  concerned  (I
still  play  "Blood  Money" regularly as I  have  not  yet  quite
managed to complete the fourth world).
 Anyway,  the graphics were supposed to be of miserable  quality,
and so was the music. Even the playability, the strongest feature
of the game,  would have decreased significantly. The nice intro,
the  rumour  would  have,  was  supposed  to  have  been  omitted
entirely.

Let's have a quick glimpse

 So  when I finally got my hands on the ST version of  the  game,
one nice Friday afternoon,  I went to sit behind my computer with
some reservations.
 "Let's  have a quick glimpse at what it looks like," I  thought,
"then I can have a bite to eat afterwards and watch my  favourite
TV show."
 It was past midnight when I went to bed.  I hadn't eaten nor had
I seen a second of my favourite TV show.  When I closed my  eyes,
all I could see were little creatures building  bridges,  digging
holes and dropping down on the insides of my eyelids.
 I slept terribly.
 The  entire weekend following was spent  playing  "Lemmings".  I
lost  quite  a  bit of weight,  and also  had  a  'difference  of
opinion'  with  my  girlfriend  because  of  the  solution  to  a
particularly difficult level.

Lemmings

 The  principle of "Lemmings" is actually very simple,  but  just
difficult  enough to make sure it's almost impossible to  explain
to someone who hasn't seen it yet.
 The game consists of 4 clusters of 30 levels in one player mode,
plus an additional 20 levels for two-player mode.  Every level is
a  contraption of variedly shaped platforms that vary  from  very
easy at the beginning to positively intricate in the later  ones.
Every level can be five to six screens in width!
 Somewhere  on  each level is a hatch from which  you  will  find
little creatures dropping,  one by one. The speed with which they
fall can vary between a set minimum speed and a maximum speed  of
100  of these creatures per time unit.  These creatures  are  the
infamous lemmings around which the entire game is built up.
 Just  like real lemmings (little creatures that look a bit  like
hamsters  - more about these (the lemmings,  that is) later  on),
their computerised counterparts are as daft as a brush. They will
all  just  walk  in  the same  direction  until  they  bump  into
something,  which  will cause them to turn around until they  hit
something else again.
 On the other side of a level is,  usually,  a gate.  This is the
exit,  and the target of the game is to get the lemmings  through
that exit.  At the beginning,  only a minor percentage of all the
creatures  have to be saved,  but on higher levels you will  find
that  it often occurs that 100% has to be saved,  i.e.  none  are
allowed to perish. On many other levels only a couple are allowed
to die - so should they have to die they'd better die for a  good
cause!
 To  assist  the lemmings in getting safely to the  exit,  it  is
possible   to   give  a  certain  number  of   lemmings   certain
instructions. This can be done by selecting from several icons in
a  panel at the bottom of the screen with the mouse  cursor,  and
then  clicking  on  the lemming you would like  to  perform  that
particular  action.  Most  instructions can only  be  selected  a
certain  number of times,  and some not at all - this depends  on
each level, where these parameters are individually determined.
 In the beginning, only one type of action can be selected, which
serves to teach you exactly what you can do.  In the last levels,
you  will have only a precise amount of certain actions  at  your
disposal - so there can be no wasting there!

The instructions

CLIMB
 Once  given this instruction,  a lemming can climb objects  that
would normally cause it to bump and turn around.
FALL
 Lemmings  are allowed to fall quite a distance,  but  once  this
gets  too big they drop dead.  By giving them an  umbrella  icon,
they  can drop endless.  If you give them an umbrella as well  as
the climb icon, the lemming becomes an athlete.
STOP
 The  lemming  that is given this  instruction  will  immediately
stand  still and stop all its buddies (who will bump into it  and
turn  around).  This is the way to prevent them all from  falling
into a chasm, for example. The disadvantage of a stop instruction
is  that  the lemming will have to be exploded to get rid  of  it
(which causes it to die, of course).
EXPLODE
 The  blowing  up is done with this.  Apart from getting  rid  of
stoppers, you can also use it to have lemmings explode themselves
through  things  like floors or walls,  which is  needed  on  the
higher levels where you might have no diggers as your disposal.
BUILD STAIRS
 As lemmings will die when dropping into water,  lava or  boiling
acid,  they have to build stairs to bridge gaps.  Deep chasms can
also be conquered this way.  When given this option,  the lemming
will start building diagonal stairs.  After a while it will  stop
(when  it  runs out of bricks,  builds into a wall or  bumps  its
head) and shrug.  You can then quickly let him continue to  build
by giving him the same instruction again. A nice use for building
stairs:  When  you want a lemming to stop digging before  it  has
reached  clear  air,  you  can have it build  stairs  -  it  will
promptly hit something,  causing it to stop building. And by then
it has already stopped digging!
DIG HORIZONTALLY (BASHER)
 When  a  wall  blocks your way (one that is not  made  of  steel
through which you cannot dig!) you can have a lemming dig its way
through this using the 'dig horizontally' command. There are also
walls  that you can only dig through in one direction  (which  is
usually not the one that you're heading for...).
DIG DIAGONALLY DOWN
 The  lemming  will start digging a way diagonally down  using  a
pickaxe - until it runs into clear air.
DIG STRAIGHT DOWN
 The lemming will start digging straight down until it runs  into
clear air.  Watch out: It may not dig too deep, as other lemmings
falling in it will then fall to death!

An example

 On one of the earlier levels there is a horizontal wall on which
the lemmings fall at the left side. The exit is on the right side
and all lemmings start walking towards it.
 Unfortunately  there's a hole in the middle,  over which  stairs
have to be built to avoid them from falling through.
 You will notice,  when one lemming starts building stairs,  that
the  others will continue walking.  They will also walk over  the
stairs even when they're not yet finished,  causing them to  drop
down  and die.  This can be solved by letting the  first  lemming
after  the stairs-builder become a stopper.  The rest  will  bump
into that one and turn around.
 Crikey!
 There is nothing on the left side of the horizontal wall against
which they can bump and turn around,  which means they will  drop
down there and die anyway! So another stopper has to be activated
at  that  spot (any spot left of the entrance hatch  and  to  the
right of the edge).
 The lemmings will now peacefully stroll to and fro between  both
stoppers until the stairs have been finished.
 You now have to blow up the right stopper so that they will  all
walk  over  the stairs,  safely towards the exit  gate.  When  no
lemmings  are walking to the left anymore,  you can blow  up  the
left stopper.
 That's all folx.

Nuke 'em

 The  above was only a simple example.  The final levels are  far
more  complicated,  where  you'll  have to  build  and  dig  with
specific lemmings simultaneously, and keep an eye that they do it
properly.  The  time limits also have a tendency of getting  very
strict.
 For the purpose of getting rid of situations out of which you'll
never  get with the proper amount of  lemmings  saved,  Psygnosis
have included another icon in the instruction panel.
 It contains the picture of a small nuclear explosion.
 Double-clicking  on this will cause every single lemming on  the
screen  to  get  an explosion countdown,  which  causes  them  to
explode  quite  spectacularly  as if in a  huge  chain  reaction,
blowing up their surroundings and everything. Nice to see.

Hooked

 As  I already said - the levels start off real  easy.  You  have
plenty  of time,  and you only have to save a couple of  lemmings
even if you could easily save 'em all.  The various  instructions
are individually taught, and are then gently combined so that you
get  to  know what you can do  with  specific  instructions,  and
combinations  of those instructions.  The learning curve is  very
flat  at  the beginning,  but it will soon reach  for  the  skies
drastically.  By then, the game will already have an iron hold on
you.  Level  after level will get conquered and you simply  don't
want to give up.
 Lucky  enough,  each  level  ends with the  specification  of  a
password  that will let you enter the next one without having  to
go through all the previous ones again. This means that you never
have to play a completed level twice,  and that you don't have to
play  the whole damn game in one session (which would mean  you'd
be playing for about a week or more without sleep or food).
 Later in the game, some of the levels will seem similar.
 "Hey,  I know that level...you just have to put a stopper  there
and then..."
 Oops.  No  stoppers can be selected!  Another method has  to  be
sought!
 ...

"Surprise, surprise!"

 Apart  from  the  excessively  exquisite,  excitingly  excellent
playability,  "Lemmings" has even more to enthral the player. The
graphics are greatly varying,  and as the levels proceed you will
also see various different traps in them.  Cables that hang,  and
fling  lemmings  up  to  die.   Sixteen-ton  weights  that   hang
menacingly  above the shortest and easiest way to the exit  gate.
Little  traps that,  when touched,  incinerate a  lemming.  Heavy
thumpers that try to make lemming marmalade.  And there's even  a
level that has no visible exit gate.
 There  are also some levels where one suddenly finds himself  in
another game.  For example,  with 100 lemmings one suddenly finds
oneself in a level of "Beast" (with matching music) or the shoot-
'em-ups  "Menace"  or "Awesome".  There's even a  level  made  up
solely of arcs that's called "Rainbow Island".
 This  really makes the game quite appealing,  as  one  regularly
finds  out  something new about the  game.  Yes,  I  suppose  the
designers of "Lemmings" know how to keep long-term interest in  a
game.

Technically speaking

 In  spite  of the system with passwords,  that makes  sure  that
you're  not  going to play finished levels again and  that  makes
sure  you'll never play the game again once you've completed  it,
the game doesn't lose any long-term interest.  The higher  levels
take very long to complete,  even though the hours spent puzzling
fly by as if they merely were minutes.
 Technically  the  game is also OK,  in spite of rumours  to  the
contrary. The sound is less than that of the Amiga of course, but
the quality is perfectly matching. The lack of 32 colours is also
not noticable,  although one does miss a couple of shades in  the
intro. The intro, by the way, is also very nice and extensive. It
surely  makes  one wonder how they slam  all  those  levels,  the
program code and the intro on one double-sided disk.
 Even when about 100 lemmings are strolling leisurely across  the
screen, many of them doing particular jobs, the game doesn't slow
down  too much.  DMA design has done an OK job here.  The  actual
design is OK as well, with minimum loading times.

Two player mode

 As  briefly mentioned before,  "Lemmings" also contains  a  two-
player mode.  We're talking split-screen simultaneous  two-player
mode here,  so no dumb stuff with two people that are supposed to
play after each other.
 Both players play in the same level, and the target is to get as
much lemmings as possible through your own exit gate (each player
has  his own exit gate).  Of course,  you should try to get  more
than  half  of those that actually exit,  so you  can  beat  your
opponent.
 Unfortunately,  the ST does not support two mice and that is the
only  drawback  of the ST version as opposed to  the  Amiga  one:
Player  number  two  has  to play the  game  with  the  joystick,
which needs quite a lot of getting used to. This takes quite some
getting used to, and succeeds in decreasing the two-player mode's
appeal quite a bit.
 There  is  also  one other major thing that  I  consider  to  be
strange: Each player has a gate with a flag above it (one is blue
and the other is green). But the player can only control the ones
with  the other color than the flag?!  This tends to  be  awfully
confusing, actually.
 Since  the two-player mode is split-screen,  each player  has  a
smaller  screen area at his disposal,  which often means that  he
starts  to scroll when coming too near to the edges when this  is
not wanted. The fact that there is no possibility to speed up the
arrival of the lemmings is also somewhat tedious:  When you  have
finished making your path is can take a long time of waiting  for
all your lemmings to finally arrive.
 If  you  really  compete in the two-player  mode,  the  game  is
downright frustrating. All you need to do is put a stopper on the
way  of  your  opponent,  or blow  his  stairs  to  bits.  Really
aggravating,  and you have to have a good bond of friendship with
the second player not to smack him in the face regularly.

Concluding

 I know software reviewers very often test a game,  concluding to
find  it "the best yet" or "best I've seen in  years".  You  know
what  I mean.  Another thing I know is that ST NEWS is  virtually
the  last  magazine  worldwide to  review  "Lemmings"  (this  was
because  Volume 6 Issue 1 was a special one,  and since we  don't
appear as often as we should).
 So  there  are scant ways to tell you exactly what  I  think  of
"Lemmings". All the usual words of praise have been used before -
even for games far inferior to this product. I also don't believe
in  seriously awarding more than a score of 10 to  a  game,  even
though  "Lemmings" deserves them more than any game title I  have
come  across during my six years of heavy computing (I am  trying
not to brag here, but just make a point).
 All I can say is that I know "Lemmings" has cuter graphics  than
"Bubble  Bobble",  more challenging puzzles than "Rick  Dangerous
II" and a more original concept than "Populous".  Above all that,
its  addictiveness  is  even beyond that of  "Arkanoid"  and  its
playability is better than "Chip's Challenge" (Lynx  version).  I
have never experienced anything quite like it - nor have I played
a single game quite that long.
 The most fascinating about "Lemmings", however, is the fact that
literally  everybody who plays it finds it  instantly  appealing,
exciting  and  incredible:   Platform-and  shoot-'em-up   freaks,
simulation-and RPG-geeks,  males,  females,  young and old.  Even
people  that  normally  hate games  grudgingly  put  aside  their
principles to play "Lemmings".
 Hours. Days. Weeks.
 Finally,  since  far too long a time,  Psygnosis have  broken  a
barrier again.  They have kept the competition grasping for  air,
struggling for the honour to have a longing look at what they can
never achieve.
 "Lemmings"  is  a  breathtaking game one should  simply  not  be
without.  I  think  it  is justified that  it  won  the  European
Computer Leisure Awards as 'best game'. Very much so.

Game Rating:

Title:                        Lemmings
Company:                      Psygnosis
Graphics:                     8
Sound:                        8
Playability:                  10
Hookability:                  10
Value for money:              10
Overall rating:               10
Price:                        £24.99
Hardware:                     Colour monitor
Remark:                       Too good to be true. Amazing.

The passwords

 I am utterly proud to be able to present to you the passwords of
most of the levels of "Lemmings".  Thanks to Miranda for  helping
me in the conquering of many levels!
 Many  magazines (including some ST-specific ones)  have  already
published the passwords to this game,  but they have all ended up
with  the Amiga passwords (har har).  So ST NEWS has a bit of  an
exclusive here - the ST passwords to the game!
 Of course,  you're a weakling if you use them,  but some of  the
levels  are  very frustrating and I wouldn't want to lose  an  ST
NEWS
 reader to some Asylum for the Mentally Extremely Corrupted.
 I  would also like to mention that the June issue of "ZERO"  had
some pretty brill tricks for the game, complete with pictures and
diagrams  of  how to conquer specifically different  levels  (the
passwords there were all Amiga, though).

 Well,  here they are.  The passwords. Don't use 'em after really
trying a level, 'cause the game's a load more fun if you actually
complete all levels yourself!
 If you use 'em without much thought anyway, you're a thoughtless
clot!
 Maybe  I should mention that there seem to be different sets  of
passwords for this game - also on various ST copies! So these may
not work...

FUN LEVEL

01 - DIPSTICK!!
02 - IJJLDNCCCN
03 - DHNDJBADCW
04 - HNLJCIOECY
05 - LDNCAJNFCM
06 - DNCIJNLGCV
07 - NCANLLDHCQ
08 - CINNNLJICR
09 - CEKHMDNJCQ
10 - MJHMDNCKCY
11 - NJOLNBALCM
12 - HMDNCINMCK
13 - MDNCEJLNCX
14 - DNCIJNMOCO
15 - NCANNMDPCL
16 - CINLMDLQCQ
17 - CEJHLFNBDJ
18 - IKHNFJCCDN
19 - NJNNJCADDT
20 - JNNJCIOEDN
21 - LFNCAJLFDN
22 - NJCIKNNGDP
23 - NCAOLLFHDU
24 - CINLNNJIDS
25 - CAKJMNJJDV
26 - MJHMFNCKDL
27 - NJMFNCALDW
28 - HONJCIOMDU
29 - ONJCEJNNDS
30 - NJCIJNMODV

TRICKY LEVEL

01 - JCENNONPDY
02 - CMOLMFNQDK
03 - CAJJLDOBEX
04 - IJHNLKCCEV
05 - OHLDKCEDEM
06 - HLDOCMNEEY
07 - LLKCAJLFER
08 - DOCMJLLGEK
09 - OCEOLLDHEY
10 - CMNLLDOIEQ
11 - CAJHMDOJEO
12 - IJHMDOCKEX
13 - OHOLKCALEL
14 - JODKCINMEN
15 - MDOCAJLNEW
16 - LOBIJNOOEK
17 - KCANLMLPEQ
18 - CINLMDOQEV
19 - CAKHNNKBFP
20 - IJJLFOCCFT
21 - NHLFOCEDFS
22 - HLFOCINEFX
23 - NNKCAKLFFX
24 - KKCIJNLGFX
25 - OCENLLFHFK
26 - BIOLNFKIFN
27 - CAJJMFOJFT
28 - IKJONKCKFT
29 - OHMFOCELFM
30 - HMFOCMOMFV

TAXING LEVEL

01 - MFOCEKLNFO
02 - FOCMKLMOFX
03 - KCAONONPFY
04 - CINNMFOQFK
05 - GEJJNDJBGO
06 - MJJNLJGCGP
07 - NHNLJGCDGY
08 - HLDNGMOEGO
09 - LDNGAJNFGU
10 - DNGIJNLGGN
11 - NGANNLDHGK
12 - GINNLDNIGT
13 - GAJHMLJJGX
14 - MKHMDNGKGR
15 - OHMDNGALGK
16 - HMDNGMOMGX
17 - MDNGEJLNGP
18 - LJGMKNOOGR
19 - NGENLMDPGV
20 - GINNOLJQGS
21 - GAKHLFNBHO
22 - IJJLFNGCHY
23 - NJLFNGADHV
24 - HLFNGINEHM
25 - LFNGAJNFHX
26 - FNGIJNLGHQ
27 - NGEOLLFHHQ
28 - GINNLFJIHS
29 - GAKHMNJJHL
30 - IKHMFNGKHQ

MAYHEM LEVEL

01 - NJMFNGALHO
02 - JONJGIOMHO
03 - ONJGEJNNHK
04 - FNGIJNMOHJ
05 - NGANNMFPHW

TWO PLAYER MODE

01 - DIPSTICK!!
02 - JAJHLDKBMQ
03 - NHLDKJADMW
04 - HLDKJINEMP
05 - LDKJAJLFMY
06 - DKJIJLLGMR
07 - KJANLLDHMO
08 - JINLLDKIMX
09 - JAJHMDKJMJ
10 - IJHMDKJKMS
11 - NHMDKJALMP
12 - HMDKJINMMY
13 - MDKJAJLNMR
14 - DKJIJLMOMK
15 - KJANLMDPMX
16 - JINLMDKQMQ
17 - JAJHLFKBNT
18 - IJHLFKJCNM
19 - NHLFKJADNJ
20 - HLFKJINENS

Another bit about software ethics

 Maybe you have read my article about "The ST's Death" in ST NEWS
Volume 6 Issue 1. Maybe you haven't. The article was about piracy
and its serious threat for software on the ST.
 I  would  like to appeal to all you crackers out  there  not  to
crack  a game as good as "Lemmings".  The authors  deserve  their
money for this one,  and I personally think you should be  pinned
to a wall hanging by your gonads if you crack it anyway.  You  do
not  deserve  to  breathe  the same  air  as  the  people  behind
"Lemmings"!
 In case you are just someone who is spreading a cracked  version
of the game, I would like to tell you that I think you deserve to
have your foreskin removed by an exceedingly blunt knife.
 Enough said.

Lemmings II

 The  game  "Lemmings" is actually based on  a  supposed  natural
instinct  of  a real animal that's actually alive on  the  planet
earth. Remarkably, this animal is called 'lemming'.
 Unlike  what  most  people think they know  about  these  little
animals, they are not very suicidal. More about that later.

 Lemmings are about 10-15 cm long, with a tail of 2.5 cm or less.
They have a thick-set figure,  a thick fur, a blunt snout, little
eyes  and small ears that are hidden within the  fur.  They  look
really cute and could be mistaken for someone's pet.
 They  are solitary little creatures that only get sociable  when
they migrate to somewhere which only happens if too many live  on
too small a spot. If their surroundings get too crowded they move
somewhere in no particular direction - which may very well be  in
a sea or a river in down a ravine.  They do not do this to commit
suicide,  but  because they assume that wherever they're  heading
there's  bound to be enough space to live.  They haven't got  the
foggiest  idea  of  the harshness of a  ravine  bottom,  nor  the
immenseness of a sea.
 They can swim very well,  but with high waves they drown by  the
hundreds, of course.

Turbo lemming

 It  is  actually a miracle why rabbits have the  name  of  being
able to er...breed very fast,  because lemmings seem to beat them
hands down.  Several times a year, a female can give birth to 3-9
young that are carried for about three weeks only.
 Lemmings  live  at heights of 750-1000 metres above  sea  level,
where  they walk around contently trying to evade being  snatched
by the odd predator.
 But  in  the  winter things get even  better.  Their  thick  fur
protects  them  from the snow,  and they build  intricate  tunnel
systems under the snow - where the predators can't get.  They can
even er...breed there,  and raise their young.  As they live  off
moss,  which grows even under the snow,  eating is no problem  at
that time either.

Lemming classification (for the science boffins)

Class     : Mammalia (mammals)
Order     : Rodentia (rodents)
Family    : Cricetidae
Species   : Lemmus lemmis (mountain lemming)
            Dicrostonyx hudsonius (collar lemming)
            And others
History   : Pleistocene to recent (i.e. the last million years)
Occurence : Scandinavia, North Asia, North America

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.