Skip to main content
© Genius

 "First we were big lamers...now we are only lamers!"
                    Silvers (in their Transbeauce II disk 2 demo)

    DEMO REVIEW: THE TRANSBEAUCE DEMO (LABOUR DAY) BY THE ST

                      by Richard Karsmakers

 I was getting really tired of reviewing megademos when I got the
fourth one in my mailbox that had to be reviewed for this ish  of
ST  NEWS.  I  swear  if  it hadn't been  sent  by  those  awfully
sympathetic people of the ST Connexion I would just have used the
disks to backup my harddisk contents on. I guess I was also lucky
that  it didn't contain any of those  fancy-having-to-search-for-
them-blasted-screens-for-hours   main  menus.   So  I  sat   down
objectively and did it anyway.

 Unfortunately,  it  started off bad.  Of the two disks that  the
demo comes on,  the first one didn't work. As I got the demo sent
to  me by ST CNX Public Relations person Klaus Berg  (Vantage)  I
sent a letter back to him with the request to send it anew. After
waiting  for  about a week I received another  copy  that  didn't
work.  As his explanation told me it was tested and found to work
fine,  I  immediately drew the only conclusion possible:  Disk  1
didn't work on my ST (a 1990 German MEGA ST with 4 Mb).  Too bad,
really,  as  that disk was said to have the best (award  winning)
screens on it.
 So that is why,  alas,  I will only be able to review the second
disk here.  This disk is subtitled "The Lesser Demos" and I guess
it's pretty much descriptive for the demos present on it.
 Sigh.
 Let's get the thing going.

 The  second  disk is a separate demo that only has its  name  in
common with the first disk.  It works all on its own, including a
presentation title picture and its own bootsector booter (a trend
I tend to like).
 This particular bootsector is quite impressive,  by the way:  It
features  a  many-colour  raster  scroller  in  both   horizontal
directions with the text "TRANSBEAUCE DEMO II". A lot better than
the  "Enchanted  Land" booter,  on which' concept it  is  clearly
based.

The Main Menu

 The  main  menu  is  one of the  first  programming  efforts  of
infamous  Mr.  De  Mauve of the Overlanders.  The  award  winning
graphics  artist (see this ST NEWS' picture!) has made the  first
steps into the world of assembler programming,  and it has to  be
said  that he is doing nicely.  Although the main menu cannot  be
described  as  anything  staggering,  I have  to  say  that  it's
incredible what Doguy can do after such a short time of  learning
machine code!
 As I already said, the main menu is no game-like thing. Instead,
it's a pic with tracking sprites on top of it and a scroll in the
lower  part.  At the top of the screen there's a slot  where  one
name of a demo screen fits in.  Pressing the cursor up/down  keys
scrolls other names in that slot.  Pressing the space bar selects
the screen of which the name is currently in the slot.
 The music, like just about all music in this demo (at least disk
two) was made by Mad Max.  Graphics by Babar,  Speedlight and The
Sergeant  (the  latter being the guy behind  the  Transbeauce  II
Party  that  boasted 250 people and 100 ST's!).  The  demo  as  a
whole, by the way, was put together by M-Coder.
 Let's now have a look at the individual screens (all 15  screens
of which 1 didn't work, plus the reset screen).

Artis Magia

 This starts off with an intro picture of a wizard.  It is  drawn
quite well, but unfortunately it is removed from the screen quite
quickly.  Next  time please have it disappear only after  someone
pressing a key, chaps!
 The graphics in the actual demo are bad.  And I mean really bad.
I really can't do much myself.  I can't code, I can't compose and
I  can't  do  graphics.  But I could have done  better  than  the
graphics artists here, really.
 Anyway,  the  screen consists of a grey graphics frame around  a
smaller  part  of  the screen where  the  more  interesting  bits
happen.  Below  that,  in the lower border,  is the  scroll  that
belong to the screen.
 The  interesting bits I hinted at just now consist of a part  of
the screen that can be divided in up to four parts (of  different
size  and shape) that can scroll individually in  any  direction.
The graphics are 4-plane,  and it's all smooth.  Not too  bad,  I
guess.
 The graphic artists responsible for this are Scorp and Zeus, the
coder  is called The Shadow (have they never heard of The  Shadow
of the Dynamic Duo?!) and the music is off "Wings of Death".

Art of Code 1

 The  Art  of  Code has two screens on the second  disk  of  this
megademo.  This  first one is called "Knuckle  Buster  II".  This
aroused me considerably, as I was the person who liked that piece
of  music in the first place and got Mad Max to do it on  the  ST
(be it without tempo changes).  The only thing that this demo has
in  common  with the TEX "Knuckle Buster" demo  (wasn't  that  is
"Cuddly" or something?) is the fact that you hear music while you
can see (a) musician(s) on the screen.  The graphics are not very
good, but the music (a TCB Tracker piece) is very adequate.
 The screen consists of a drawn mixing panel,  a loudpspeaker and
a TV screen.  The lower bit of the screen features a scroll text.
Pressing CONTROL flicks the on/off switch on the mixer and on  it
goes. On the TV you now see three musicians playing the music. It
made me think of the Commodore 64 "Thrust Rock Concert" I  really
liked. A nice screen, thus.
 The  most  original thing about this  screen,  however,  is  the
graphics of the scroll - i.e.  the font.  It is made of seemingly
random  characters cut out of a newspaper - different  styles  of
characters  on  a  piece  of  paper  each.   Very  original,  and
remarkably readable.
 The  code  in  this screen was done by  a  chap  called  Philip,
graphics by Franiz and composition by Equalizer.

Art of Code 2

 This screen is less appealing to the beholder than the other Art
of Code screen. It is basically a 3D vector graphics screen (line
figures,  with  no  hidden faces) with a vertical  text  sentence
scroll in the background during the less complex shapes.  Ever so
often, the text scroll vanishes and more complex 3D shapes appear
on the screen (which also move in more than 1 vbl).
 Code by Doodah.  Font and music ripped from TEX (well,  at least
they get the credit).

Cybernetics

 This  screen  didn't work with me.  For a flash of a  couple  of
milliseconds,  I  saw a large "Transbeauce II" logo and then  the
whole system reset. Well, this eventually lead me to discover...

The Reset Screen

 Like all reset screens nowadays do,  this screen features  texts
that  thank all people who contributed to the demo (at  least  to
the second disk).  It seems to have been done by our good  friend
M-Coder, the best non-OVR programmer in France.
 It's a kind of colour shock screen with text appearing on top of
it,  screen by screen. The colour effects are good and get better
and  better,  but  transformations between the  effects  are  not
smooth. Tut tut, Mr. Coder!
 The font was off Algernon, the music by Mad Max (sigh).

Defcon 4

 It  looks  as  if the names of crews are  getting  stranger  and
stranger by the day...
 Another virgin screen here - i.e.  the first more or less decent
screen done by yet another new French crew.  It seems that France
is crawling with demo crews at the moment, which probably account
for  most  of  the success of Parties such  as  Transbeauce  that
nobody  outside  France  ever gets to hear  off  until  they  are
finished and the party demos are distributed.
 This  Defcon  screen is rather OK,  I guess.  It looks  good  at
least.  The screen is divided in two parts.  The lower border has
the shape of a train moving very fast to the left, coming back at
the right,  moving to the left, etc. This train is the French TGV
(Train Grand Vitesse), the fastest European train. On top of that
train  a scroll text runs - thank God is runs a lot  slower  than
that train.  Most of this scroll text is in French. I am not sure
whether this is good,  but it might not be too bad as the  French
are usually bad at English...
 The rest of the screen (i.e. the normal screen size) is occupied
by a rather large D4 logo drawn on stone that is bouncing up  and
down.  It  looks cool,  and I guess it's 4 planes as  well.  Five
tracking sprites spelling T,  R, A, N, S and II are moving around
that large shape,  sometimes in front of it and sometimes  behind
it.
 Looks OK to me, this screen.

Equinox

 This screen consists of two parts. The first part is quite lame,
and consists only of text sentences scrolling up,  a  Transbeauce
logo at the top and an Equinox logo at the bottom.  Nothing  much
goes on here. So press space...
 And you're in the second part of this demo coded by Al Cool  and
Checksum.  This consists of so-called bobs - a text scroll  where
each character is made up of balls. There's a starfield behind it
all, and the scroll text eventually starts rotating and flipping,
effectively making it totally unintelligible.

Holocaust

 This screen is, oddly enough, called "Original Demo". Let's hope
they meant this in jest.
 The  music is certainly original.  It is one of the  tunes  that
virtually  nobody has ever used in a demo,  probably for  obvious
reasons: Mad Max' mediaeval "Dragonflight" music.
 The rest of this screen, I'm afraid, is less original. There's a
lower  border  with VU-metres in  it.  These  VU-metres  actually
indicate  volume by scrolling a whole line of the screen in  both
horizontal directions.  Further,  there is a disting "HC" logo at
the upper part of the screen,  a scroll text in the middle and 12
tracking sprites (2 planes?) on top of it all.

M.C.S.

 I  still don't know what the name "MCS" stands for,  but  all  I
know is that this screen is called "WALLS".  This is actually  an
acronym for "What A Lame Little Screen".  Well,  it's not too bad
actually.
 First  of all there are Starballs.  These are exactly  like  the
TNT-Crew's  starball screen in the "Union Demo",  with the  least
amount  of balls.  On top of that,  M.C.S.  put 4-layer  parallax
scrolling  'grass',  rasters,  a  screen-wide-bouncing-distorting
Transbeauce  II logo,  and a text that types  itself.  Both  side
borders are completely removed as well.
 All code by The Hooligan. Music by Mad M...no. I am not going to
say that name again.

Megabusters

 Quite an orignal screen, this one. You'll love it if you're into
making love,  flowers, and dope. Well, let's not exaggerate here.
You'll probably like it if you're into flowers.
 This screen is divided in two parts.  The lower bit is  occupied
by a scroll with a rather eye-piercing font. It is made of normal
characters covered with flowers. This is quite difficult to read,
actually.  The rest of the screen consists of a piece of graphics
around which balls start to me.  First there's 10,  then 20,  and
then you loose count.  It's one of these screens where the  balls
just keep on coming and coming (the oldest ball is never  removed
though,  so we all know it's a trick with multiple screens).  The
added  effect here,  however,  is that these balls  increase  and
decrease  in size and move behind and in front of  the  mentioned
bit of graphics.
 Code by Djaydee (or something like that),  grrrr by Grizzo.  You
can guess yourself who the music is made by.

Misfits

 The  Misfits  should  actually be called CILWVUM  (this  is  not
Welsh,  but means "Crew In Love With VU-Metres").  You'll see why
in the next paragraph.
 First there's a short,  rather OK intro picture.  'Short'  means
that it disappears (too) quickly.  Then the actual screen starts.
The music is "Comic Bakery" by M(SENSORED)X. On top of the screen
there's a logo with rasters.  In the middle there are two strange
creatures at each side with a text scrolling up between them.  On
the  lower  part  of the screen (though  not  the  lower  border)
there's the hottest bit of this screen (you're right:  VU metres)
with  a  "TMF"  logo  scroll  with  standing  mountains  in   the
background between them.
 Coding by Joker, graphics by O-Bewan.

Outlaws

 This  is  technically possibly the worst screen  on  the  second
disk,  now  I come to think of it.  All it has is a  rotating  3D
starfield,  a distorting (heavily distorting) "The Outlaws"  logo
and a scroll.  No borders open or anything.  A chap called JPP is
responsible for this - he has a lot to learn, I am afraid.
 The  scroll text contents deserves the award of  "Worst  English
Ever In A 1991 Scrolltext".

Silvers

 This  screen starts off with a tiny scroll line and  music  (the
"Prehistoric  Tale"  game-over tune).  Then this is  replaced  by
more, i.e. the real demo screen.
 On  that  screen there's a top border scroll  with  rasters  (16
shades of grey) in the background.  These flicker quite  awfully,
unfortunately.  Below  that,  there's a vertical scroll  of  what
first  seem  to be abstract signs but that later turn out  to  be
characters.  This  is  very hard to read,  and contains  all  the
'greetings'.  All code by Cram,  and all graphics and the  scroll
text  by Dr.  C.  I guess these guys must be  English,  as  their
scroll  text  is pretty damn  brilliant.  Apart  from  that,  the
scrolltext  writer  likes  Metallica,   Slayer  and  Megadeth   -
guarenteerd  symptoms of high sanity that are but seldomly  found
in France...

T.B.C. (The Black Cats)

 This demo consists of two screens,  the latter of which is  very
funny  indeed.  But let's not spoil the fun yet and first do  the
first part.
 This consists of a screen built up of three parts.  The top part
has  a  top-and- side-border-scroll with a  Robocob  font.  Looks
good.  The  lower border contains a barrel scroll with  greetings
and the like. The rest of the screen (most of the normal size) is
taken  of by a large Transbeauce II logo,  on top of which  a  3D
line  vector shape (hidden face) moves.  There is only one  shape
there, which does not change.
 All  code by Sharpman,  graphics by Emulator and music  by  that
silly German with the long hair and the tendency to drink shampoo
("Enchanted Land" level 1 music).
 The  second part of this demo is quite funny,  and is  based  on
some scanned pics taken from the famous cartoonist Marcel  Gotlib
(Dutch: Koos Voos, German: Peter Pervers, etc.). Funny, and a tad
naughty. The sound effects accompanying the effects are brilliant
and well fitting. More of this next time!

T.S.B.

 Coder  Disk Zapper and graphics artist Judge Dredd put  together
this one. It looks quite hectic, but I'll try to put it down here
for you to form a picture of it anyway.
 There are 3 large VU-metres in the background (yawn).  There's a
bigscroll (1 plane) going horizontally on top of  that,  mirrored
in the load of rasters below. Those rasters function as a kind of
landscape  (doesn't  scroll,  though),  from  behind  which  also
appears  a giant vertical scroll (one plane).  As the  characters
are  more than a screen in height and only part of the screen  is
visible  this is impossibly difficult to read.  From what  I  was
able  to read of it,  it consisted more of a list of  members  of
T.S.B.,  of  which most had the remark "(SWAPPER)"  behind  their
name.
 Hm.
 The music in this screen, I'm positive, was not made by that odd
German with the even odder hairdo - it is very short and does not
wrap.  So most of the time spent looking at this demo is spent in
divine  silence (you can listen to your own music on the  stereo,
for example).

Voyagers-Enigma

 Many  of  the screens on this disk  has  VU-metres.  Thus,  this
screen  could hardly be an exception to this rule  and  therefore
isn't. But at least these guys have done something quite original
with it. Basically, it has three small blocks that emulate little
screens  with scrolling backgrounds and a scrolling text  through
them.  These move up and down according to the music volume.  The
music,  now I'm at it,  is not made by Mad Max and is very  good!
There's six different pieces of music, as a matter of fact, which
can be selected by pressing F1-F6.
 The bit of the screen above the VU metres alternately displays a
"Transbeauce" and a "Voyager" logo.  Below the VU metres you  can
see an Enigma logo, well drawn, that wobbles and dists.
 Below that,  there is a text that types itself. This happens too
slowly  so  that even I didn't read all text (this  is  quite  an
achievement for them as I nornmally read all scroll texts and the
like). It uses a good font that looked familiar, though.
 The best bit about this screen was the music.

Concluding

 I really hope that the first disk of this demo is a lot  better,
for  otherwise  I am afraid that this demo will even  rank  lower
than  the "Lightning Demo" (the Pendragons may be uninspired  and
freaky,  but their programming talents are more evident).  I hope
to  be able to offer the review of the first disk in the next  ST
NEWS
 issue, when I will have had time to visit someone who has an
ST on which it works.
 I am sure all contributors meant well, but I am afraid that they
do not have the class of the Overlanders or the demos compiled by
the Delta Force and The Lost Boys...

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.