Skip to main content
© Syndicate

                       LIVING A DYING LOVE
                             PART I 

               an Autobiography by Bryan H. Joyce

 
 This article was submitted by Bryan H. Joyce, author of previous 
"Tavern Stories". We considered it worth publishing as Bryan, one 
day, will surely become a celebrated writer...
 This article has appeared in "STUNN",  too,  but in a form  with 
different layout.
 Unlike  all  other articles,  no quotes have been added  by  the 
editorial staff in order to preserve the integrity of this piece.
 

 Hi!  I  am  a science fiction writer called Bryan  Henry  Joyce. 
Look,  that's me there just below the title. You probably haven't 
heard of me as I am just at the start of my career.  I am  called 
by  that  name for it is the name which I  was  given.  I  wasn't 
consulted  in  the matter,  for that is the way  in  which  these 
things   are  done.   Like  Pip  said  in  the  film  of   "Great 
Expectations",  "whether or not I will be the hero of my own life 
remains to be seen." My life started long before I was named, but 
I guess the name is a good one for I have no desire to change it.
 This  narrative is my own thoughts and ramblings on the  meaning 
of life.  Not your life.  My Life.  Parts of it will not be  much 
fun.  Life is like that,  but the bitterness always comes with an 
underlying sweetness.  Life is a process of using the good  times 
to  help  you come to terms with your own eventual  demise  (I've 
come closer than most).  Once that fact is fully appreciated  the 
true  ridiculousness of the situation can be focused  upon.  Life 
and  love are full of happiness and sadness,  but  everything  is 
full  of humour.  Sometimes too much humour.  Many moments of  my 
life have emulated a badly written sit-com.
 Hey, hasn't everybody's?
 For example, I am 29 years old at the moment. I rarely socialise 
and I'm what the unenlightened would call a computer freak.  I've 
never  had  a proper job and I'm in love with a  beautiful  woman 
who's in love with me,  yet we rarely see each other.  I was  the 
worst at English in my class, yet I'm starting to get places with 
my science fiction. I've never had any money, yet I'm typing this 
on a computer which at the time I built it would have cost nearly 
a thousand pounds to buy.
 Crazy,  huh?  But where is the humour in all that? Oh it's there 
all right,  if you like irony! I'd like to tell you about it all, 
but where do I start?
 How about the time when I was ten when I agreed with my  friends 
that the age thirty was incredibly old.  We would be better  off, 
in  a  few years time,  killing each other  rather  than  letting 
ourselves  get as old as that.  I'm thirty years old  next  year. 
It's rather a nice age to be.  To the real youngsters you're  old 
enough to respected.  To the proper grown ups your old enough  to 
be taken seriously.
 Don't we all talk a lot of crap when we're 10 years old?

                              *****

 "Look  to  the mote in thine own eye," said the  Devil  to  God. 
"Will you cast the first stone?" he continued,  then laughing  he 
added, "I think not!"

 God just shrugged and walked away. 

                              *****

 Three   of  my  loves  are  Computers,   Science   Fiction   and 
Rock'n'Roll.
 We'll  leave the computers out for the moment and make  a  quick 
comment  about Rock'n'Roll.  In their  song,  "Rock'n'Roll  Ain't 
Noise Pollution",  the band AC/DC said the most poignant thing  I 
consider  to  have  ever been said  about  rock  music;  to  wit, 
"Rock'n'Roll is just Rock'n'Roll." You can't really say more than 
that, can you?
 That just leaves my middle love,  science fiction.  Here's  what 
Frederik  Pohl said about his love of science fiction at the  end 
of his autobiography entitled "The Way The Future Was."

                              *****

 "You  don't  love a person just because  she  rewards  you.  The 
person  is rewarding because you love her.  So it is with me  and 
science  fiction.  For  the  gifts she has given me  I  am  truly 
grateful.  But I loved her on sight, giftless, and it looks as if 
I'll go on doing it as long as I live."

                              *****

 I  guess things are the same for me.  My mother tells me  how  - 
back in 1963 - at a few months old I would sit up in my pram  and 
watch  "Doctor Who" on our tiny black and white  television  set. 
Sometimes  you are drawn to a subject for no reason  at  all.  It 
just  happens that way.  I've been writing science fiction now  - 
with the occasional foray into other realms - for nearly thirteen 
years and boy are my fingers tired (groan).
 I  am finding it quite difficult to get into this  autobiography 
because I just don't really know where to begin. Life is just too 
holistic to identify starting points accurately.  "Synchronicity" 
may be a nice song by a band called the Police,  but it is a  bit 
of a bummer to trace when your writing an autobiography.
 This is not the first time I've tried to write an autobiography. 
In December of 1990 I was rushed to intensive care as the  result 
of several years of major illness.

                              *****

 13/10/84 - My novel "Starigrade" is stuck at page 108.  I  can't 
be bothered finishing it as I've an idea for another novel called 
"Herman"  about the things that happened on the CB  radio.  Don't 
think that I will finish "Starigrade" or start "Herman" 'cause  I 
don't care enough about either of them to be bothered. I feel ill 
all the time and the world is full of crap, Why, oh why do I feel 
ill all the time?  The doctor keeps on saying that it's just  the 
flu. Something's wrong and it's mucking up my life. What the hell 
is it? So much for 1984.

                   (Paraphrased from the diary of Bryan H. Joyce)

                              *****

 When I got out of hospital in January 1991, I started to write a 
fictional account of my experiences during my illness called, The 
Thirteenth  One.  It  was  so called because I had  had  been  on 
thirteen major training schemes or part time jobs.  I scrapped it 
because  it  was too depressing and personal,  but -since  it  is 
fairly accurate - I suppose that bits of it might be suitable for 
inclusion in this narration later.
 Here is an example of how depressing it was....

                              *****

 Pain.
 All consuming Pain. The sort of pain only a practising masochist 
can dream about. Red hot. Screaming. Let me die. Billion volts of 
soul-ripping gouging pain.  All personally demonstrated  in  the 
privacy of your own home.  Yes folks, for a small mystery payment 
you  too  can  have your own personal hell bound  trip  into  the 
twilight zone.  See how you squirm.  See how you sweat. Learn how 
to gasp sentences through gritted teeth.  And it's all  available 
now. Right now. Out of the blue.

                           (Opening para from The Thirteenth One)

                              *****

 This autobiography was actually started about two months ago.  I 
completed the first page and then put it aside.  Last Saturday  I 
had I phone call from Dave Burns of "Stunn" magazine.  He  wanted 
to know if I was still writing and,  if so,  why hadn't I written 
anything  for "Stunn" for ages?  I promised that there was a  new 
Tavern  story  on the way and he would receive it from  me  soon. 
That reminds me - Dave, what happened to that modem card you were 
sending?
 To  cut a long story short,  I decided that the new story  would 
take too long to finish.  Since Dave would need something to keep 
him going in the meantime, I decided that it was time to get this 
autobiography moving.
 I  think its time to take a leaf out of the Douglas Adam's  book 
("Ah,  that's where he got the word holistic!") "The Hitch-hikers 
Guide  To  The  Galaxy".  He told the story of the  book  not  by 
talking about the actual book,  (well,  not much) but by  talking 
about some of the lives it affected.  Well,  I'm going to do  the 
reverse  by talking about one of my own stories and how  my  life 
effected it.  The story in question is called "Love, Death And An 
American  Car".  It is approximately 5000 words long and  is  the 
second  of a series of stories set in the Tavern At The  Edge  Of 
Nowhere.
 Before  I get to the actually story,  I think I should tell  you 
how I became a writer. I often tell people that I became I writer 
in order to improve my appalling handwriting, but the real reason 
is not as clean cut as that.  Truth is,  it was an accident. Here 
is how it happened....
 My  mother  at one time did a bit of writing.  She used  an  old 
Adler  typewriter.  When  she gave up writing the  monster  of  a 
machine was left to gather dust in my bedroom.
 One  day - sometime in 1979 - I was walking up to  the  shopping 
centre with a friend called David when I heard an unwelcome voice 
shout to me.
 "Hey, Joyce! Come here. I want to talk to you!"
 The  voice came from somebody I had hated in school  (I'll  call 
him Jim Doe because I can't remember his real name). Actually, it 
wasn't just me who hated him, it was everybody. You probably knew 
somebody like him yourself. He wanted to fit in, but he couldn't. 
He  had  a  truly  bad  attitude,   but  just  didn't  have   the 
understanding of human nature or the intelligence required to  be 
a bully.  Instead,  the only thing he was good at was  irritating 
everybody  to  death.  He would drift from group to  group  being 
tolerated until folk got sick of him and expelled him - sometimes 
violently.
 That  day in 1979,  I groaned at the voice,  hurried my  walking 
pace  that  bit  faster and pretended that I  hadn't  heard  him. 
Unfortunately,  he couldn't be put off that easy.  He ran up  and 
slapped me on the back.
 "Hi!" he said.
 "Hi Jim." I said. My pal David wasn't so polite.
 "I've  got  something to tell you," he  said,  ignoring  David's 
rather crude remarks.
 "What?" I said.
 "I  just  want  you  to know that the next time  I  see  you  by 
yourself, I will kick your 'kin head in!"
 David made a remark that was along that line of that Jim Doe was 
a very stupid woman's private part and couldn't fight sleep.
 "I'll get you too!" he told David.
 I shrugged,  sighed,  nodded and went on my way.  Jim turned  to 
follow me and David kicked him hard on the backside.  Jim uttered 
a  few  more  threats and suddenly left declaring  that  we  were 
lucky, "Cause my lunch is nearly ready and I'm starving!"
 That incident started my writing career.  Later that day I wrote 
a  short  story on my mother's old Adler about a  guy  meeting  a 
monster in the park and the monster saying, "Come here. I want to 
talk  to you!" The story was untitled and was in three  chapters. 
The whole story fitted onto a single page.
 These days, I write them a bit longer.
 I've never ever did find out what Jim was going on about. It was 
typical of the manner in which he behaved in school. I swear I've 
never thought about that odd incident again until I came to write 
it down just now. I wonder whatever happened to Jim Doe? I really 
do hope that he eventually grew up and became likeable,  though I 
doubt it!
 No doubt,  you're wondering what this has got to do with  "Love, 
Death And An American Car"? Patience dear reader. We'll get there 
eventually.
 Having completed my first short story,  I went on (just for fun) 
to  write a Monty Python style science fiction about a  detective 
in his thirties called Sam Sponge.  It was called "The Man In The 
White Boiler Suit".  It isn't worth describing the plot here.  It 
ran  to  6  pages and I never finished it.  It  was  another  odd 
incident  which prompted the writing of that particular piece  of 
nonsense. David and I were walking my dog Daisy (God rest her) in 
a  local  park.  On  the way home,  we went past  a  large  field 
containing  one massive tree.  In the field was a man  wearing  a 
white  boiler suit.  He walked behind the tree and didn't  appear 
again.  Needless to say, David didn't see the man at all. I don't 
think I saw anyone either,  it was probably a floater in my  eye. 
The tree was well over a hundred yards away and I wasn't  wearing 
my glasses at the time.
 Sam Sponge and the "Man in the White Boiler Suit" have  appeared 
in  dozens  of  unfinished short stories  and  a  few  unfinished 
novels. After writing Sam Sponge's first unfinished short story I 
decided to have a go at writing a novel.
 Even  although I could not type  properly,  spell,  use  grammar 
correctly  or  grasp  the fundamentals  of  plot  structuring,  I 
managed over the next year or so to stretch my original one  page 
untitled story into a 102 page novel.  It had the terrible  title 
of, "A Planet Called Spoof". The main character was a younger Sam 
Sponge.  It  was a one off manuscript with not one  word  changed 
after  it  had been typed.  The  mistakes  were  horrendous.  The 
grammar  appalling  and the slapstick  plot  non-existent.  After 
failing to get it published, I decided to join a writers group.
 After   winning  last  place  in  one  of  the   writers   group 
competitions,  I  quit the group.  I did some reading up  on  the 
concepts  of  writing  fiction.  I had just  read  Larry  Niven's 
masterpiece  "Ringworld",  so  I decided to write a  proper  hard 
science  novel.   It  took  about  three  years  and  was  called 
"Starigrade".  It  ended up only about twenty or so pages  longer 
than,  "A Planet Called Spoof".  Although it was another piece of 
rubbish,  it was rubbish with a proper plot.  The main  character 
was called John Brendan.  He was an asteroid belt miner.  I liked 
him  so much that he became the hero along with my dog  Daisy  in 
one of my current projects the novel,  "Angle Park" (it's looking 
quite good so far).
 Everything  I wrote in the early years was pretty bad because  I 
still couldn't type or spell. Since it often took up to two hours 
to  type  one page,  there was not much chance of  me  re-writing 
anything.  I decided that I needed a word processor,  but  didn't 
have the money.
 At that time in my life I liked to listen to the band Meat Loaf. 
An  album appeared on the market by Jim Steinman called "Bad  For 
Good".  He was the guy who wrote all the Meat Loaf hits. I bought 
the album.  It was and still is,  bloody  marvellous!  Marvellous 
except  for one really bad narrative prelude to one of  the  best 
tracks,  "Stark Raving Love". It had to have been the worst thing 
that  I'd ever heard since Hawkwind had done their version  of  a 
Michael Moorcock piece called "Sonic Attack".  The only endearing 
thing  about Steinman's narration was the title.  It was  called, 
"Love And Death And An American Guitar" (too many and's in it). I 
liked the title so much that I changed it slightly and started to 
write a story about a guy meeting his ideal woman in a car  park. 
Thus "Love,  Death And An American Car" was born.  Three  hundred 
words into the story and I was stuck.  I wanted to write about  a 
guy   who   had  got  his  head  cut  off  and  turned   into   a 
superconductor.  How  could I connect that car park meeting  with 
the  guy with the missing head?  More importantly,  what was  the 
story  going to be about once that connection had  been  made?  I 
didn't know I decided to let the story sit for a while to see  if 
anything came up.
 About  then  I read a novel by Spider Robinson that  was  called 
"Callahan's  Cross Time Bar" or some such thing.  I  had  already 
read  some of Niven's "Draco's Bar" stories and wanted  to  write 
some bar room tales my self.  I had one small idea which I  wrote 
down in a few lines on a note pad which I promptly  lost.  Here's 
what those lines were...

                              *****

 The Abcronxuddlern grinned with needle tipped poisoned teeth.  A 
drop  of  milky poison was licked from its thin  lips  with  much 
relish.  It  extended  a massive hand on the end of  one  of  its 
almost skeletal arms, towards me. With a noise like a switchblade 
opening,  a  stumpy,  black splintered claw sprang out  from  its 
index finger.
 "Here, allow me!" It growled.
 A year ago,  I would have fainted dead away with fright, but now 
I  just smiled and handed over the green crystal bottle.  With  a 
pop of gases,  the Abcronxuddlern levered off the stainless steel 
cap from the beer bottle and handed it back.

                              *****

 Seven years later, I came across those few lines again and wrote 
the first of the Tavern stories.  I also discovered the  original 
300 word version of "Love,  Death And An American Car", but now I 
knew  how  to write the story.  I was unable to write  it  before 
because  it was a tale from the Tavern,  but I hadn't known  that 
because I hadn't yet invented the Tavern! More about that later.
 As  I  wasn't getting anywhere with Sci/Fi,  a change  of  style 
seemed imminent. What would the new project be?
 I  researched  the market and discovered that Stephen  King  was 
probably the richest writer on the planet.  It was time to  write 
my first horror novel.
 The new novel was called "Herman". I'm not going to tell you the 
plot here because it's never been done before and I'm using it in 
the new Tavern story (entitled "The Jawman").  When it reached 80 
or 90 pages,  I scrapped it supposedly because it was too violent 
and had too much swearing.  In reality, it was scrapped because I 
was  feeling  far  too ill all the time to  be  bothered  writing 
anything.  I  told myself that writing would be much easier if  I 
got that word processor that I was thinking about. I went out and 
bought a Commodore 64. Big mistake!
 The software was "Mini Office".  The C64's memory was so limited 
that by the time I had loaded "Mini Office",  there was only room 
left for about a dozen pages (actually, I don't think it was even 
as much as that) and there was no spell checker.  Example of  the 
C64's  limitations - during the course of writing this on  my  PC 
I've moved a block of text bigger than the maximum document  size 
allowed by the C64's memory.
 While the C64 is an okay computer,  you can't type novels on  it 
particularly without a disk drive, extra memory or a printer. The 
lack  of  a spell checker was a disaster.  It had been  the  main 
reason for buying the thing in the first place. I had to find out 
more about computers.
 Since  I  was on the dole,  I went and asked if  there  was  any 
computer related training schemes about.  There was and I went on 
one.  Not straight away though. It took 3 months of mucking about 
before  I got a phone call from someone called John (we ended  up 
good  friends) at the local Employment Training Centre.  Could  I 
start tomorrow? You bet ya!
 The  computer department was in the process of being set  up  so 
their wasn't a lot happening.  Resources were 3 Apple Iie's and a 
BBC B. There wasn't even a full time tutor. John did the tutoring 
as  well  as  his  main  job simply because  he  had  a  love  of 
computers.  The  important  thing - for me - was  the  chance  to 
discuss computer related topics with like minded people.
 After a few months I got a second-hand computer called an  Atari 
520  STFM.  The FM bit on its name stood for Frequency  Modulator 
which meant that it could be attached to a TV just like the  C64. 
It had a single-sided floppy disk drive and loads of memory  when 
compared  to  a  C64.  John had let me use his  own  ST  on  many 
occasions and helped me to raise the money to buy the second-hand 
ST.
 The  new  computer was great!  It was  wonderful!  It  could  do 
anything.  But  it still didn't have a printer and I didn't  feel 
well enough to want to do any writing anyway. 
 Nearly a year went by.  I doubled the memory capacity of the  ST 
up  to  one megabyte and fitted a double-sided  disk  drive,  but 
still didn't do much other than play games or muck about.
 Then  around the second week in December of 1990 my life was  to 
change  suddenly  forever.  It was a Monday and I felt  very  ill 
indeed.  By Tuesday night, I was in surgery for several hours. It 
was supposed to have been an exploratory, but when they opened me 
up  it was found that my pancreas was apparently not  working  at 
all.  The flesh had rotted and the resulting extremely  corrosive 
slime  was  irritating  my other organs.  What  was  left  of  my 
pancreas had swollen up and looked dead. A lot of it was cut away 
and  my other organs had to be cleaned.  In the bowel is a  valve 
which stops the excrement from coming up from the intestines  and 
into the stomach. I had been so violently sick that the valve had 
jammed  open and my stomach was full of excrement.  In  order  to 
deal with these things they had opened me up from my groin to the 
bottom of my ribs.
 By  midnight,  it  was certain that I was going to  die  and  by 
parents were rushed out to the hospital.  I flatlined on the  ECG 
machine several times, but didn't die for more than a few seconds 
at a time.
 When  I  pulled through the operation by a  narrow  squeak,  the 
doctors told my parents that I would probably be in a coma as the 
trauma  would have been too much.  When I didn't go into a  coma, 
they then said that it would be several days before I woke up and 
I might be a vegetable. Wrong again! A few hours later, I woke up 
in intensive care annoyed that I couldn't find my glasses.
 Everybody was amazed except me!  As I had been wheeled into  the 
operating theatre the night before,  I had made up my mind to  do 
something.  I was so determined to do this thing that death would 
have been a great inconvenience.  When Death came for me,  I  did 
like Flash Gordon and told it to, "Zark Off!"
 The  operation scar was very large and looked like two  bits  of 
raw steak that had been sewn together.  To the left and right was 
two  holes  in my abdomen through which large pipes  carried  the 
poisonous fluids out of my body.  There was about six drips going 
into a network of taps which went into my left arm and by way  of 
a long internal tube went more than a foot into the blood vessel. 
The  ECG  heart machine worked through three pads stuck  onto  my 
chest. There was a probe clipped onto my right index finger. What 
it did was to shine a light onto the skin and measure the  amount 
of  redness that bounced back.  With that information,  it  could 
work out if there was enough oxygen reaching my blood stream from 
the oxygen mask that I was wearing.  On top of all that, a urinal 
tube was also in position.  Just as well. It would be a long time 
before I could go to the toilet again.
 What  follows  is  a  drastically  re-written  excerpt  from  my 
unfinished novel the Thirteenth One.  All the fictional bits have 
been  taken  out and what remains is very accurate.  Bits  of  it 
might seem to you to be very contrived and in places  theatrical, 
but  it  was  originally written directly  after  coming  out  of 
hospital when the pain was all too fresh in my mind.  I  wouldn't 
have written it in such a manner today for I am detached from  it 
by  two  years.  You'll  have to forgive  the  intensity  of  the 
excerpt.  If I had toned it down then you would never be able  to 
understand  why the experience had such a profound effect  on  my 
life and, by obvious association, my writing.

                              *****
 
 That morning I was confused,  melancholy, nauseous, dizzy, jumpy 
and had a splitting headache. The pains in my stomach and chest I 
put down to stress or nervous tension.
 It was December 1990 and, though I didn't know it at the time, I 
was dying.
 Walking to work that day was miserable. It was pouring down with 
freezing  cold  rain  and the north wind  was  howling  something 
chronic.  The last time I'd been out in weather so foul had  been 
about  eight  years ago when myself and David had hired  a  cheap 
caravan at a site down at Berwick upon Tweed in January.
 What a holiday that had turned out to be! We had planned to do a 
cycling  trip of the numerous historical sites using the  caravan 
as a base.  It started off straight away as a lousy trip and  got 
worse  in  a  hurry.  We almost didn't get there at  all  as  the 
weather was so bad.  On arrival, we got snowed in. The roads were 
blocked for a week.  The caravan's water pipes froze  solid.  The 
gas  only  worked when it felt like it and the caravan  park  was 
crawling with cops all week because one of the locals who  stayed 
there all year round had disappeared under strange circumstances.
 Turns  out that the guy had taken a short cut across the  frozen 
lake and fell through the ice.  It had frozen over the top of him 
and snowed on top of that.
 I  really shouldn't have gone to work that day as I felt  really 
bad. I had been feeling pretty bad for a long time, but was worse 
than usual because I was also really depressed.  At the weekend I 
had asked out a woman friend whom I had known for a long time and 
fancied something rotten. I was sure she would have gone out with 
me,  but she said no.  Not only that,  she no longer wanted to be 
friends  with me when she found out that I thought about  her  in 
THAT way. I've never had any luck with women.
 By  3  O'clock that day,  my head was throbbing  like  a  virgin 
inside a prostitute.  I'd had enough for one day.  It was time to 
go home.  Little did I know that it was going to be three  months 
before I would be back.
 On my way home,  I went to the corner shop and bought twenty low 
tar cigarettes because they didn't sell low tar in tens. Although 
my  head  was still throbbing and I felt as depressed as  it  was 
possible to be without actually being suicidal, I bought a bottle 
of strong wine and took it home.
 That evening,  my pal Andy came over to see how my date had went 
at  the  weekend.  I explained that it hadn't and he  watched  me 
drink my wine. Later, I want back to the shop for a second bottle 
of  wine.  I  was feeling so ill that I decided not to  open  the 
second  bottle  and instead went to  bed  early.  Before  falling 
asleep  I  lay in the dark listening to the rush of blood  in  my 
ears,  the  drum beat of my heart and thought about woman  for  a 
long time.  Nothing rude,  mainly it was thoughts about wasn't it 
time I thought about getting a proper relationship.  By proper, I 
meant for longer that the usual two or three months.  After  all, 
it  was 1990 and I was 27 years old.  Depressed I rolled over  in 
bed and eventually fell into a tormented sleep.
 Next day I awoke at four in the morning feeling truly  terrible. 
I toyed with the idea of reading from my note pad at the side  of 
the bed.  It was there so that I could write down any interesting 
dreams  that I might have.  In the nearby cupboard,  was  half  a 
dozen similar notebooks filled with assorted dream bumf.  Now and 
again I'd get an idea for a story, but ninety-nine times out of a 
hundred it would turn out to be meaningless claptrap.  I  decided 
not  to  bother and just lay there for some  hours  feeling  very 
sick. 
 The pain didn't start until almost seven in the morning. When it 
hit  it went from zero to a billion volts of pain in  about  five 
minutes.  It felt like I had a large white hot rock sitting under 
the  V of my ribs and had been kicked in the stomach by a  horse. 
For  years  I had experienced such pain every now  and  then.  It 
usually  only  lasted a few minutes.  The pain  had  always  been 
unbelievable, but it had never been as bad as this before.
 I lurched to the bathroom.  Whilst I was sitting on the toilet I 
was violently sick into the bath.  The pain in my gut managed  to 
do  the impossible and double in intensity.  It was then  that  I 
realised that I wouldn't be going into work that day.
 Back in my room,  I tried to get dressed and failed. The pain of 
moving  about  was just too much for me.  I sat on my bed  for  a 
while.  I toyed with the idea of banging on the wall or floor  to 
attract  somebody's attention but decided  against  it.  Sometime 
later I lurched down stairs and into the living room.
 "Could  you  walk me to the medical centre?  I  think  I've  got 
appendicitis."  I  said to my father who looked  shocked  at  the 
sight of me.  I was sure that it must be my appendix.  In a telly 
program  seen  years ago,  somebody had said the pain  caused  by 
appendicitis  was  the  worst kind of pain  there  was.  My  pain 
couldn't get any worse, could it?
 "It doesn't open till nine O'Clock.  The phones are manned  from 
the  back  of  eight.  I'll see if I can  get  you  an  emergency 
appointment," my father said.
 I guessed from the look on his face that I didn't look too good. 
I  was slick with cold sweat.  By looking in the mirror over  the 
fireplace,  I found out that I was as pale as death. Stupidly, my 
only thought was that I looked like an android like Mr DATA  from 
the new "Star Trek" shows.
 Waiting that hour for the phone call was torture.  There was  an 
emergency appointment at eleven O'clock. There was no way I could 
wait until then so I insisted to be allowed to phone my work  and 
tell them that I wouldn't be in today. Having done this, I waited 
until ten to nine and set out with my father and someone else - I 
can't remember who - to walk the quarter of a mile to the medical 
centre.  They wanted me to get a taxi but I wouldn't hear of  it. 
Why  I insisted on walking I'll never know,  the pain was so  bad 
that I found it difficult to talk.
 The green prefab of the medical centre was normally only a  slow 
walk  of less than five minutes away.  We took more than  fifteen 
minutes to get there.  The walk was in silence. I was too much in 
pain  to  realise just how upset my father was (and  whoever  the 
other person was). Half way there, I wished that I'd let them get 
the  taxi  to run me there.  By now I was really shaking  and  my 
skin,  which  had been slick with sweat,  now felt as if  it  was 
covered  in a thick layer of heavy icy moss.  I had a bad  moment 
when I started dry retching, but it was over quickly.
 When we got there,  I had to wait for about ten minutes for  the 
doctor.  My own G.P.  wasn't available so I was taken by  someone 
else.
 The  Doctor seemed quite concerned about me.  He took  his  time 
examining  me and then had a word with me about what I'd been  up 
to  the  day before.  He considered carefully before  hitting  me 
straight between the eyes with the truth.
 "You've got a stomach bug." He said.
 For years,  every time I'd felt like death warmed up and dragged 
myself  off to see a doctor,  he usually told me that I've got  a 
bug or a bad dose of the flu. Each time I was told this, I felt a 
great sense of relieve for I had increasingly begun to think that 
there  was  something  seriously wrong with  me.  This  time  his 
explanation did not calm me down.
 "Nobody feels like this, with only a stomach bug!" I said.
 "Stomach bug.  It's doing the rounds just now.  A real  stinker. 
It's giving lots of people a fright.  That and the bottle of wine 
that you had last night. That's all that's wrong with you."
 "But I wasn't drunk last night."
 "Probably a bad bottle of wine on top of the bug."
 "Have you...got a sick bag? Think am going to be...."
 As  I vomited,  I brought my hand up to my mouth.  Yellow  gunge 
spurted with force from between my fingers.  A lot of it  managed 
to splash upwards onto my glasses or go down both the sleeves  of 
my 'yuppy' coat.
 "Sink! Behind you!" He said calmly.
 I spun round and leaned over the sink.  My glasses fell into the 
sink.  The  next blast of vomit was so forceful that  it  bounced 
back  out  of the small stainless steel sink and hit  me  in  the 
face.
 Stupidly,  I was vividly reminded of a sequence near the end  of 
the novel I'd written called "Starigrade".

                              *****

 ...the last thing John Brendan remembered was the  creature.  It 
opened it's leathery black mouth to take another bite out of  the 
rock.  The  beam from the tumbling laser fired into the  animal's 
mouth.  The  result was as unpredictable as it was  unbelievable. 
First the Starigrade's mouth slammed shut.  Wouldn't  yours?  The 
creature  seemed  to shrivel in upon  itself.  Then  it  suddenly 
bloated  out  to more than twice it's previous  size.  The  mouth 
opened wide.  As the creature tried to turn itself inside out, it 
began to cough.  It coughed light.  Bright light.  All  consuming 
light.  The ultimate purifying flame. It coughed Starlight. After 
a split second of orgasmic pain, there came the eternal darkness. 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.