Skip to main content
© Dieu of Hemoroids

 "Under brooding skies and watchful eyes
  On convulsive seas of false urgency
  We walk empty corridors in vain..."
                                         Fates Warning, "No Exit" 

                       THE LADY WORE BLACK 

                      by Richard Karsmakers

 
 Inspired  by  Queensrÿche's  "The Lady  Wore  Black",  music  by 
Gandalf and Vangelis, and a Female. 


 When he topped the hill something like awe struck the  poet.  It 
was  as  if he suddenly heard the soft vibrations of  an  ode  to 
beauty,  a  ballad  to  nature.  A cool wind  touched  his  face, 
bringing  with  it the soft scent of  spring,  the  fragrance  of 
budding  trees and roses,  drifting beyond his senses as the  sun 
spread  its glorious rays across seemingly endless  pastures  and 
meadows.  It  seemed to be playing tricks with shadows like  dark 
flames probing at his hair.
 The poet sighed deeply.  This was a sight for sore eyes,  a view 
that  could lift the spirits of the  dullest  hearts.  Tastefully 
positioned  hills sloped as far as the eye could reach as  though 
a  frozen green sea of land and grass;  a light mist hung in  the 
air, as if delicately placed to mimic the dream visions of a true 
Goddess.  Voices  seemed to whisper enchantingly amid the  trees, 
beautiful  colours of green and gold reached the most inner  part 
of  the poet's being.  Shimmerings as pure as those  of  diamonds 
caught his eye as dew-covered boughs heaved and bowed placidly in 
the gentle morning breeze.
 He  had  never  seen the world portrayed in all  its  grace  and 
virtue like this.  Not before.  It seemed like magic, the kind of 
magic that only a beautiful spring morning with a soft breeze and 
a light mist can invoke.
 When  he listened more carefully he could hear a brook  flowing, 
somewhere.  He descended from the hill top, almost being absorbed 
physically  into this palpable magnificence,  the almost  uncanny 
grandeur  of  everything around him.  He felt the force  of  life 
flowing  into his lungs with every breath,  he felt his  nostrils 
tickling in a teasing,  almost exciting way. He stifled a leap of 
sheer happiness.
 There it was.  Just behind a copse,  a rivulet trailed off  into 
the mist-covered meadows.  Its water was clean,  inviting him  to 
touch  it,  almost  luring him into drinking it.  Fish  swam  and 
jumped energetically,  the clearness of the water reflecting  off 
their silvery skins.  The little river's bottom was covered  with 
rocks  and the occasional water plant.  It was as pure as  liquid 
diamond.
 He knelt down,  closing his eyes so he could absorb the sound of 
rushing water better.  If he would lie down he knew he could doze 
off  in  the early morning warmth of the sun,  listening  to  the 
water and the birds.  Sleep for hours in an almost majestic  kind 
of peace and harmony.
 He  kneeled down to drink.  The water was bright,  catching  the 
light  from the sun and casting it back in a  thousand  different 
directions.   It  played  tricks  with  those  enchanted  by  its 
appearance of simple serenity.
 The  poet bent over to drink.  The liquid tasted pure,  cold  as 
ice.  He closed his eyes, feeling the water going down every time 
he  swallowed.  He savoured the sensation that sent shivers  down 
his spine.  He drank to his heart's content. It seemed to refresh 
his body and spirits.

 When  he opened his eyes again he noticed the mists had  somehow 
extended themselves.  They now floated gently at a short distance 
above  the  water  as if they were  living  entities,  afraid  of 
touching the water but instead probing, progressing, moving as if 
by some preternatural force.
 He suddenly saw a reflection, barely visible behind the pink and 
brown blur of his own,  in the constantly transforming surface of 
the water.
 When he looked around, startled, he saw nothing but a piece of a 
black robe vanishing in the mists that had gathered  tremendously 
in the last few seconds. He erected himself, seeing the mist move 
across his feet gently,  enfolding his  legs.  Probing.  Sensing. 
Conquering.  There were no flowers to be seen here,  but the  air 
nonetheless smelled of roses even more than it had before.
 He looked up to the sky only to see great,  threateningly  black 
clouds march across it as if gathering strength for some kind  of 
momentous occasion.  They rumbled,  turned, whipped, ocassionally 
formed  shapes  of huge bulging monsters that  dissolved  moments 
later.
 The  sun had been covered completely by now;  it seemed to  hide 
itself reluctantly.  The mists intensified, moving quicker around 
the  poet  as  the breeze increased  to  a  light  wind,  tugging 
somewhat at his clothes.
 Who was that person,  that mysterious reflection of which he had 
caught a hazy,  distorted glimpse in the water?  Why did the  air 
suddenly smell of roses even though there were none?
 Around  him  the silence grew.  Even the sound  of  the  rivulet 
seemed to be dampened by the lingering mists,  the birds suddenly 
no  longer  seemed to want to perform their lovely  serenades  of 
spring.  Perhaps  they were afraid - or perhaps they were  merely 
respectfully silent,  awed by something yet unknown.
 A very soft sound could be heard now.  It seemed to come towards 
him like the waves of a sea,  sometimes intense, something barely 
audible.  It sounded like music. Whistling, perhaps. It came from 
the  direction  where he had guessed the  mysterious  person  had 
disappeared to.
 Careful  so  as  not  to walk  into  anything  shrouded  in  the 
perpetual mists,  the poet started walking in the direction where 
he guessed the sound came had to come from.  He quickly  relaised 
he  was  walking in the right direction,  for  the  sound  became 
clearer,  more beautiful,  clearer.  As he had thought before, it 
was the sound of someone whistling.  The melody seemed, if he had 
to  put  his finger on it,  contain sadness as well  as  infinite 
grace.
 The countryside had changed. Where he had earlier walked through 
seemingly  endless  pastures  and meadows  with  some  occasional 
trees,  there was now a dense forest that was only interrupted by 
sharp  pieces of rock protruding from the torn earth towards  the 
grey sky, reaching like reaching ligaments, twice a man's height. 
The poet heard the whistled tune ever clearer now.  It seemed  to 
be right ahead of him. An irresistable urge took control, an urge 
to  find out who the person was that whistled,  what it was  that 
caused this sudden dream,  this sudden change of landscape,  this 
sudden wind, the dark sky. The smell of roses.
 Then he saw Her.

 On a fallen tree not far away sat a Lady clad in black, with Her 
back  turned to him.  She had pulled back the hood of  her  robe, 
revealing  long  dark  hair that fell  freely  around  Her  proud 
shoulders.  The  expression that radiated from Her body was  very 
much  like the tune that arose from Her lips -  infinite  sadness 
and  grace,  as if she were lamenting a tremendous  loss  greater 
than any mortal could ever have endured.
 She did not see him yet,  nor did he see anything but Her  back. 
But  Her silhouette on the fallen tree made his breath  stick  in 
his chest. A great sadness took hold of him, he knew not why.
 He  got closer,  trying to make no sound that could startle  the 
Lady.  She continued her sad tune, as though She was not aware of 
anyone being around.
 There  was no mist near Her,  as if the thin film of clouds  was 
alive  and hesitant to touch Her or even come close to  Her.  The 
trees  loomed high above Her shape;  beyond their tips there  was 
nothing  but darkness.  The whole world seemed to be in  darkness 
but for the bit around her.  The gathering clouds in the sky  had 
made night of day, as if nature no longer mattered.
 He  noticed  the  smell  of  roses  intensifying,  his  nostrils 
perceiving every tiniest of scents as if in some higher state  of 
awareness.
 He  came  yet closer and found the mists parting  at  his  feet, 
forming  something like a path before him - leading to  the  tree 
that the Lady sat on.
 Before  he  knew it,  he was in the same enclosure as  the  Lady 
and her tree.  They were now surrounded by a wall of trees on all 
sides.  It had the appearance of a prison - only this prison  had 
been  made to keep the world outside from harming that which  was 
inside.
 He would have sworn there had not been a tree where he had  come 
from,  but now there was. The forest seemed alive, throbbing with 
some ancient sense of purpose.  He looked around  him,  realising 
he  should  feel threatened  but,  strang  enough,  didn't.  From 
somewhere deep inside, a feeling of inner peace gently spread out 
to the most remote parts of his body like a powerful and  totally 
beautiful drug.
 When  he  suddenly  noticed the sound  of  leaves  and  branches 
brushing  against each other in the wind he suddenly realised  he 
no longer heard Her whistling.
 He looked at Her, to find Her looking at him.
 Her face was as if carved by a Great Sculptor's hands, a modern- 
day  Michaelangelo.  Her  jugular bones protruding enough  to  be 
seen,  Her eyes were of deep soulful grey,  like jewels amid  her 
complexion  that was silken and white like purest velvet spun  of 
milk.  Around  the stunning splendour of Her face hung  beautiful 
hair,  curled, long and as raven and as pure as a the blackest of 
starless nights. The kind of hair, loose like the wind, that make 
you wish you were a brush. The kind of hair you would want to let 
flow  through your hands lovingly,  hair you would want to  brush 
from Her face, clear away from Her eyes. Her mouth had delicately 
formed  lips that glistened in a light he could not  discern  the 
source of.  He was so absorbed gazing at Her face and  incredibly 
black hair that he began to stutter an apology but ended halfway, 
not  being  able to produce anything more but a  sigh  that  sent 
goosebumps across his back and arms.
 He  had  written  poems  about  beautiful  women  draped  across 
priceless  couches in exquisite clothing.  He had  composed  love 
songs to the most magnificent Goddesses of the heavens above;  he 
had described their silken skins,  the softness of their breasts, 
the deep serenity of their glorious eyes,  the intoxicating taste 
of  their lips,  the tantalizing smell of their  breath.  He  had 
conceived  poems  that  brought colour to the  cheeks  of  Queens 
Supreme  and  had  lamented woeful partings  of  loved  ones.  He 
thought he had seen everything that was beautiful on earth.
 But one glance at this Lady was more than all he had ever  felt, 
more than he had ever considered any mortal capable of feeling.
 Emotions of death and birth, joy and sadness of a thousand lives 
surged  through  his being,  increasing with every  beat  of  his 
heart. This was the kind of Woman you'd like to learn French for, 
the kind of Woman that could have made a peaceful phylosopher  of 
Atilla the Hun.
 He   staggered,   not  quite  knowing  how  to  cope  with   the 
overwhelming emotions that took hold of his frail inner self.
 Before  him  sat  a Woman more beautiful than  anything  he  had 
beheld  before.  Here  sat an ancient  Acropolis,  a  magnificent 
Gothic  Cathedral,  the most proverbially bewitching of  Paradise 
Birds,  the proudest of Lionesses,  the sweetest of French Wines, 
the most delicately tuned of Violins, a brightest of Suns, a most 
impressive of She-Dragons, a High Queen of High Elves.
 She looked at him, smiling a lovely smile of purest sadness.
 He sank to his knees, quite incapable of doing anything else. He 
gazed  at  Her  with an instant and  deeply  sincere  feeling  of 
adoration and devoted love.
 There  was  no escape.  He didn't want to  escape.  Earth  would 
crumble if he would ever have to tear his eyes away from Her, the 
heavens  would  split  and the universe would be  reduced  to  an 
insignificant piece of emptiness with no reason for any mortal to 
live.  He would dwell in darkness if She would turn him down.  He 
felt  with  every fibre in his body that if he was ever  to  part 
with  this  Lady  again,   life  would  be  less  than  a  hollow 
shell  of  nothing.  The singing of birds would hold  no  beauty. 
Mists   lingering  across  green  meadows  would  cause   instant 
depression.  Odes to Aphrodite would be meaningless. Music or art 
of any kind would never again hold any value for him. The biggest 
mountain  would  not be high enough to surpass  his  sorrow,  the 
deepest sea not deep enough to drown his grief. He was so full of 
love for Her that it made tears leap at his eyes.
 She looked away from him,  as if remembering something that tore 
open old wounds that were revealed deep within the centre of  Her 
soul.
 His  entire  being cried out mutely to Her,  body  language  and 
supernatural  signals  being the languages of the  universe  that 
this Lady in Black understood like no other.
 He  felt peace and rest flow through him when She looked at  him 
again,  quite suddenly.  It was immediately followed be a feeling 
as he was being quartered,  made love  to,  born  and 
withering  away - all sensations combined in but a fragment of  a 
second that he spent in intense agony and profound pleasure  that 
he could not help but sense in all aspects with every cell in his 
body. He felt as if steel lances were driven through every muscle 
in  his  body,  as  if he was being burned in  the  middle  of  a 
supernova,  tortured  horrendously  by Evil lords - but  he  also 
experienced the feeling of the accumulated love given by  mankind 
since Eden, the first step on another planet, a thousand orgasms, 
the  intricate  scent  of  thousands  of  rare  and  intoxicating 
flowers.
 She arose from her tree like like in a dream.  The poet tried to 
reach  out  but couldn't.  He wanted to walk  but  found  himself 
unable to do so. She was warning him, which he felt very clearly. 
Being able to love Her would have its price,  the heaviest  price 
for any mortal to pay.
 She  did not speak a word.  The trees parted as She walked  off. 
The  spell  had vanished.  He found himself  capable  of  walking 
again. She  had set him free,  free to chose for himself what  to 
do.  Go home and be without this Lady for the rest of his life  - 
or go with her and pay the price.
 His heart leapt, his soul cried out, his cells writhed in agony. 
Whatever the price was,  he was prepared to pay.  All his life he 
had  dreamed  of  this,  wished for this  to  happen.  The  price 
mattered not. She was all that mattered.

 He  followed her to a small wooden cabin that lay partly  hidden 
by dense undergrowth.  A slow drizzle had started falling but  he 
felt  none  of it.  Drifting on clouds of  overwhelming  love  he 
followed Her shape,  spellbound again.  He adored Her  footsteps, 
beheld with adoration the odd leaf that was brushed aside by  Her 
feet as She strode by.  He worshipped the way in which She  moved 
as  if motion itself was but a means designed for Her to be  even 
more  inexplicably ravishing than She already was.  Some  way  or 
another,  he felt as if the entire universe revolved around them, 
as if their movements were swinging the earth and the planets  in 
their perpetual orbits around the sun.
 Everything seemed utterly unimportant all at  once.  Everything, 
that is, except for the two of them.
 It seemed as if he heard bells tolling in the distance.
 All  his senses succumbed to the overwhelming sensation he  felt 
throughout  his body,  the feeling of  deep  desire,  admiration, 
affection  and  lust.  He  wanted to be one  with  this  creature 
mentally and physically, no matter what the cost.
 Forever.

 Outside,  the gathering power of the rain thundering on the roof 
of  the  small wooden cabin remained unnoticed  while  they  made 
passionate love,  crying cries softened by the mists, loving like 
mankind had never been able to love before. They melted together, 
merging  their  minds and bodies  together  indefinitely,  losing 
themselves  in  the  forever  increasing  whirlwind  of  passion, 
soaring  through the edges of heaven,  ornamenting  their  golden 
love with the most beautiful gems.
 They  became one with the trees,  the forests,  the  lands,  the 
world,  the seasons,  night and day,  deserts and polar caps, ice 
and  steam,  all Gods that had ever arisen,  all beauty that  had 
ever existed in the greatest empires past and future.  When their 
tongues met they kissed the gates of heaven.  When they held each 
other they embraced immortality.
 This was not something earthly, not even something heavenly - it 
was something that could only be of equal status with the  stars, 
with the galaxies.  It was something that could not be  surpassed 
until eternity, not even until the very end of all, when time and 
space themselves collide.
 Their  combined  desire  was as  insurmountable  as  a  mountain 
touching  the  sun,  as intense as the Krakatau  making  love  to 
Venus,  as hot as the centre of a thousand galaxies'  supernovas, 
as vast as all the earth's oceans combined.
 Something that could make Death come alive, or die.

 When the poet woke up,  the first thing he smelled was the scent 
of roses lingering through the small wooden hut.  His entire body 
felt  pleased like it had never felt before.  His head rested  on 
the pillow like it had never rested before.  In a peculiar way he 
felt tired but wonderfully alive at the same time.
 The  sun shone brilliantly,  its rays almost touchable  as  they 
fell  through the floating dust above the bed on which  it  shone 
through a broken window.  Through the cracks came the warm  smell 
of summer,  carrying with it the fragrance of thousands of  other 
flowers.
 She  looked  even more incredibly beautiful in the rays  of  the 
rising sun that fell on the gentle curves of Her naked body.  Her 
eyes  were closed,  Her breathing soft and  regular.  He  brushed 
aside a strand of her raven hair and kissed Her cheek.  His  lips 
tingled with the sensation of that skin of purest velvet.  He had 
the  feeling of death and birth again,  the feeling of  a  planet 
crashing  down  on him and a Woman giving him the kiss  of  life. 
Still.
 He had to lie down.
 They  had spent several months together.  His first sunset  with 
Her had been the dawn of a new life altogether different from the 
pale  death  he  had hitherto had the audacity  of  calling  'his 
life'.  She had never spoken a word,  but Her eyes had spoken  of 
worlds unknown,  experiences unsurpassable by dreams or  reality, 
love unattainable by mere mortals.
 They  had seen the sun rise and set many times,  they  had  seen 
rain fall and dry.  They had heard the trees grow buds, the grass 
become long,  the forest animals raise their offspring.  They had 
felt each other's touch,  each time celebrating it by  harvesting 
each other's love to the full.  He realised he had hitherto  been 
as  unacquainted  with  true love as a blind man  would  be  with 
colour,  a  deaf man would be with midsummer serenades.  The  sun 
rose  in  her  eyes,  her loins sang songs  of  love  mixed  with 
absolute  sadness.  She  was a Lady he would need  death  for  to 
forget, more beautiful than love itself.
 He wanted to know what lay behind Her. Who She was, what the was 
reason was behind the infinite sadness that seemed to have a firm 
hold on her.  Was She a Goddess? A Fairy Queen? The embodiment of 
Beauty?
 He would try to read the story of her life from the soulful grey 
of  Her eyes,  seeing only tales a mortal would never be able  to 
understand.  Every  day  he would try to  find  words  pertaining 
beauty  and  love that were suitable enough to describe  Her  and 
what they felt for each other.  Every day he would wonder at  Her 
sadness more. He would plea Her to talk, beg on his knees for Her 
to divulge her secrets,  regardless the cost.  Each time he would 
bring it up She would cry. Each time he saw the tears in Her eyes 
it  had  felt  as if Her love  was  flowing  away,  unsalvageably 
seeping into the cabin's wooden floor.
 In the end She couldn't keep it from him any longer.
 They both paid the price: Mortality and immortality. 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.