Skip to main content
© Dave 'Spaz of TLB' Moss

 "Q: How does Michael Jackson pick his nose?
  A: From a catalogue."
                              Joke courtesy of the Dixie Flatline 

              THE FALCON CHRONICLES OF YOURS TRULY 

                         by yours truly
                           (Guess who)

 
THE FIRST MUSINGS - FRIDAY, AUGUST 21ST 1992 - LATE AFTERNOON. 

 I've  just been to the Düsseldorf Messe in Germany where I  have 
seen the first revealing of the Atari Falcon 030  (thanks,  Math, 
for  allowing  me to drive with you!).  To say that  I  had  been 
drooling  from just about every pore and other cavity in my  body 
would be an understatement: I almost wet my pants - the Falcon is 
any  computer freak's dream,  and I the thought  of  exaggerating 
here has not even crossed my mind.
 The  Falcon  030  is to computers what "Terminator  II"  was  to 
special  effects,   what  the  invention  of  the  wheel  was  to 
transport,  what  the  pyramids were to the  Pharaohs,  what  Joe 
Satriani is to guitar playing, what Teri Weigel is to some Monaco 
prince  and,  to  use Sam Tramiel's  slightly  less  illustrative 
words, "what the ST was to computers in 1985".
 Of course you have also read various things about the Falcon  in 
the computer press in the recent half year or so - you'd have  to 
be  pretty  off  the world and out of touch with  Life  (and  the 
Universe,  and Everything) if you hadn't. Some of the things have 
been true,  some have been false.  Let me therefore tell you  all 
about the Falcon 030 (henceforth to be called simply Falcon) in a 
nutshell.

 (Imagine top half of empty peanut here.)

 The hardware.

 The  Falcon  boasts a Motorola 68030 CPU running at  16  Mhz,  a 
Motorola DSP 56001 Signal Processor (runs at 32 Mhz),  all the ST 
custom  chips in one (called Combo) and the Blitter (runs  at  16 
Mhz now).  It can have 1, 4 or 14 Mb RAM. It has an internal 3.5" 
1.44 (High Density) disk drive in its 1040-lookalike casing, with 
a  65  Mb  2.5"  IDE-interfaced  internal  hard  disk   optional. 
Interfaces  include  an SCC port (like in TT and MEGA  STE  LAN), 
video  (VGA),  TV,  MIDI  (in/out),  joysticks (just  like  STE), 
cartridge  slot (identical to ST),  internal expansion bus  (like 
MEGA ST),  modem, printer (only bidirectional this time), SCSI-II 
(hard disk - I'm not certain whether you can use the old Megafile 
drives though),  stereo headphones out, stereo microphone in, and 
a  DSP Port (although it is quite unclear so far what you can  do 
with it but it'd probably make you drool if it was).

 The video specs.

 I've heard it said that all video modes can be displayed on  any 
TV  or monitor,  with only the picture quality getting better  or 
worse  depending on the bad-ness of your video device.  This  may 
not  be  true.  Anyway,  according  to the  specs,  we  have  the 
following resolutions: VGA 640x480 with 256 colours from 262.144, 
VGA 320x480 with 65.536 colours,  VGA 320x480 with 32.768 colours 
(with overlay bit),  RGB/TV 768x480 with 256 colours from 262.144 
(interlaced),   768x480  with  65.536  colours  (interlaced)  and 
768x480  with  32.768  colours  (interlaced  with  overlay  bit). 
'Overlay  bit' means that,  in addition to the computer  picture, 
you can have any TV or video screen image on top of it or in  the 
background  by  means  of a Genlock device.  Of  course  it  also 
supports  the ST video modi,  including the monochrome modus  (as 
well  as the TT ones with the exception of the TT high res  one). 
As  the Falcon has a VGA connector you need a small plug  to  use 
old  Atari  monitors  but this is supposed to be  sold  with  the 
Falcon at no extra price. Hardware scrolling is supported for all 
modi  (including ST mono?) and the border can be switched off  by 
software (i.e. hardware overscan modus).

 The sound specs.

 You  thought  the video specs were sortof OK,  well  here's  the 
sound specs.  Of course the thing is ST compatible as well as STE 
compatible so that the thing starts off with the YM soundchip and 
the STE/TT030/MEGA STE stereo 8 bit PCM DMA sound.  That's OK, of 
course,  but  wait  until you get to know what the  Motorola  DSP 
56001 can do:  8 channel 50 Khz (i.e.  better than CD quality) 16 
bit  DMA  sound!   This  means  true  quality  music.  Using  the 
microphone  input port you can just record it straight  into  the 
Falcon  (which has a 16 bit AD converter in the DSP) and you  can 
play it back just like that (because, incidentally, it also has a 
16 bit DA converter built (in the DSP?) as well). The nice thing, 
also,  is that playing all that stuff costs zero processor  time
For the non-technos among you:  You still have the 68030 left for 
100% to do really interesting things with.

 Some more miscellaneous stuff.

 It has a real-time battery-backed clock.  It has 512 Kb ROM  (it 
is not yet certain whether it will have MultiTOS on ROM  though), 
a  space is ready to plug in an MC68881/68882 math  co-processor, 
an  internal  RAM  bus and it has a new keyboard  chip  that  can 
handle  300 DPI mice (the normal one you'd use is 100  DPI).  Its 
TOS  is supposed to be TOS 4.0.  It has an internal mono  speaker 
built in (because VGA monitors don't support sound).

 (Please imagine lower half of peanut shell here. Thank you.)

 I've seen demos with amazing quality pictures being superimposed 
on each other and all that usual horny demonstration stuff. Whoa! 
I've heard this chap distort his voice without any hardware  add- 
ons (except for a plain microphone).  I've heard CD-quality music 
being  played by a  Harddisk-Recording-and-Playback-System  (only 
additional hardware required: A hard disk. It's all software). It 
was  really  (I'm really sorry for having to  use  the  following 
word,  but  it  really fits here in my  humble  opinion)  f@*king 
awesome.

 What about the software?

 Well,  of course the thing is ST-compatible to a certain  extent 
(which is supposed to be fairly large). Of course, this instantly 
makes vast amounts of software available, and...
 Hey ho. Wait a minute. I'm sounding like an Atari sales brochure 
here. Let's revise this. 
 At  the  moment  only demos could be  seen,  together  with  the 
Harddisk-Recording/Playback  program  (which was  made  by  Lynet 
Systems Ltd.).  Eclipse (yes!) are working on some Falcon  games, 
however, and I've already seen a smooth looking Llamasoft release 
looking  like  an  incredibly souped-up  "Attack  of  the  Mutant 
Camels"  (and,  indeed,  called that).  Also,  a British  company 
called  Mirage  (where Julia "Microprose" Coombs  now  works)  is 
developing a Falcon-specific space adventure called "Space  Junk" 
(due for release in 1993).  So far the certain bits. In the field 
of rumours I've heard that Hisoft should be developing a  drawing 
program for the thing,  whereas someone else (in Germany,  I seem 
to  recall) is developing a soundtracker for  the  machine.  I've 
also  heard that The Exceptions (TEX - or at least some  of  'em) 
will work together with the Respectables on some first demos  for 
the machine!
 And,  with  ST NEWS working on it,  what more is there  to  wish 
(ahem)?

 According to the guy who distributes my virus killer in  Germany 
it is vitally important that I get one of these machines  pronto, 
i.e. by mid September I should have one at home. I can't wait. In 
the  mean  time  I've already heard  several  people  proclaiming 
they'll  sell their ST and buy a Falcon instead  (Marc  Freebury, 
Math Claessens, Kai Holst and possibly Bryan Kennerley so far). I 
really  can't blame them - and they haven't even seen  the  thing 
(which  would be even more prone to cause instant ST-selling  and 
Falcon-buying).
 Please take my word:  The Falcon is a miracle machine. Sell your 
ST while you still can.  Get a Falcon a.s.a.p.  You won't  regret 
it.  I've  heard a price of US$ 1000 quoted for a 4  meg  system, 
though it is not sure whether this is with or without a  built-in 
hard  disk.  The Falcon looks set for a decade of success -  demo 
groups that left the ST are getting interested,  software  houses 
are developing stuff and yours truly will surely get one!
 More details to follow...
 
MORE THOUGHTS - SUNDAY, AUGUST 23RD 1992 - EARLY AFTERNOON. 

 I've just been on the phone with Stefan,  who visited the  Atari 
Messe  yesterday with Timimanikin.  He was very impressed by  the 
Falcon  but  will  wait  with  a  purchase  until  his  financial 
situation  looks better and,  even more  importantly,  until  the 
Falcon 040 will be released. Eclipse's Marc Rosocha mentioned the 
Falcon  040 to me on Friday as well,  stating that "it will be  a 
machine quicker than the quickest PC".
 Stefan added an interesting thing to this:  The Falcon 040  will 
run at 60 Mhz!  Of course,  it will also have the Motorola  68040 
chip built in instead of the 68030.
 Suddenly my urge to get a Falcon 030 has mellowed down a bit.  I 
wonder how much more expensive the Falcon 040 will be and when it 
will be released. I'll probably also check out what you'd have to 
do to a Falcon 030 to get it upgraded to be a Falcon 040...
 More to follow!
 
MORE THOUGHTS VOLUME II - MONDAY, AUGUST 24TH 1992, AFTERNOON

 This  morning  I  called Atari Benelux and inquired  as  to  the 
release date and all of the Falcon 040.  I also inquired what the 
differences between the Falcon 030 and the Falcon 040 would be  - 
apart  from the obvious things such as the 68040 and the  60  Mhz 
clock rate.
 Well,  Mr. Wilfred Kilwinger (Software support) told me that the 
thing  will have a full external VME bus (I don't know what  that 
means, but it's big and all and the TT and MEGA STE have it too), 
some  more DSP,  some more cards,  some more graphics and  a  lot 
bigger  case  with  separate  keyboard.   And,  he  added  as  an 
afterthought, it will be approximately three times as expensive.
 I have therefore decided not to desire a Falcon 040 and  instead 
to  go for the 030 just like I intended.  I mean I like a bit  of 
extra speed but I don't need the rest, really.
 In  the mean time I doubt whether I will be able to sell my  old 
Mega  ST  with TOS 1.6/1.0 switchable,  as I suppose some  of  my 
favourite   games  ("Super  Sprint",   "Bubble   Bobble",   etc.) 
probably won't work on the Falcon. Also, it's a German one that I 
probably couldn't sell easily here in the Netherlands.
 More due very soon.
 
AND YET MORE - TUESDAY, AUGUST 25TH 1992, LATE MORNING

 This  morning  I  called Kilwinger  at  Atari  Benelux  (again). 
Yesterday  I had gone to bed with some questions that nagged  me. 
Could you for example still connect your old hard disks (say  the 
Megafile  series) to the Falcon?  What version(s) of the  machine 
would  be available?  And what would the blimmin' thing  actually 
cost?
 The  answers  I  got were  the  following:  "Not  yet,  but  two 
companies  are building an ACSI<->SCSI converter so it should  be 
no problem then", "We don't know about the Netherlands yet but in 
Germany the thing will for now only be available in a 4 Mb  model 
with  a  65 Mb hard disk built in" and "In Germany it  will  cost 
around 2300 German marks".
 Now  that was some really interesting news.  The price does  not 
include  a  monitor.  Still,  one helluva price for such  a  mean 
machine.
 I  don't  suppose I'll write more here until  I'll  actually  be 
able to touch my own Falcon on my own desk.
 
SO I WAS WRONG - THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 10TH 1992, LATE AFTERNOON

 Yesterday  I called Atari to see whether anything  exciting  was 
up. As it happened, nothing exciting was up but Mr. Kilwinger did 
tell  me  that  he could send me some general Falcon  info  if  I 
wanted.  Of  course I told him to chuck it in the mail pronto  so 
that,  in case the postage system didn't screw up, I could get my 
hands on it today.
 The postage people didn't screw up.  I got it.  I now know  some 
more things I am just craving to tell you.

 For  starters it seems that Atari have learned from  their  past 
desasters (i.e.  the STE and TT).  Both times 'round, the problem 
was lack of software.  They've found a very clever way of solving 
it: Including some software with the machine!
 Calappt.
 A  personal information  manager.  Diary,  alarm,  import/export 
data, that sort of stuff. Sounds naff but, hey, it's for free.
 Procalc.
 Sounds  even  naffer  than the  other  one.  It's  a  calculator 
(surprise!). Might it be that Atari wants to push the Falcon as a 
serious machine?
 System-Audio-Manager. 
 This sounds more interesting - at least to me.  It allows you to 
record  sounds and connect them with Operating System  functions. 
Opening  a  window  might then be  accompanied  with  "Zonk",  or 
booting with "Welcome Earthman".  A nice thingy.  Probably  costs 
you a bit of memory to have resident, though. 
 Clock.
 A talking clock!  Rather superfluous,  of course,  but it's  the 
kind  of stuff that makes non-Falcon-people's mouths  drool  when 
you demonstrate it at your local computer club.  Atari claims  it 
won't slow the system down. 
 Landmines.
 Atari  is obviously set to do the Falcon as a  serious  machine, 
judging  by  the  overall naffness of the  actual  games  they'll 
include. For more info, see "Breakout".
 Breakout.
 Atari  thought:  "Hey,  we have some old licenses lying  around! 
Let's  make  incredibly souped-up true colour stereo  CD  quality 
music
 versions of them!"
 So they did. For more info, see "Landmines". 
 Audio Fun Machine.

 Now this sounds genuinely interesting again. It's a program that 
makes full use of that nifty little DSP thing inside the  Falcon. 
All  you  need  is  a microphone and  off  you  go,  echoing  and 
reverbing and chorussing and equalizing and bitch fending  (er... 
pitch bending)!

 Concluding, no matter how impressive the Falcon as a machine is, 
the  software  titles  enclosed with the  machine  are  not  very 
impressive except for one or two of the titles that deserve to be 
called "quite interesting".

 The  Atari  leaflet  also mentioned some  software  to  be  made 
separately  (and  which  should  be  available  at  the   release 
already).  Digital  Arts has "Retouche Professional CD"  for  the 
Falcon,  Compo  has the "That's" series as well as  a  Compo/Sack 
80386-based  MS-DOS emulator.  Matrix has a video digitizer  that 
utilizes the Falcon's 32,768 colour mode,  Trade It has  software 
and  hardware allowing 3D animations on video.  Llamasoft  has  a 
beta  version  of "Attack of the Mutant  Camels".  Last  but  not 
least, the picture processing program "AIM" (from the Polytechnic 
of Delft, Netherlands) will be available in a Falcon version.

 The documentation also mentioned "MultiTOS" (pre-emptive  multi- 
tasking with adaptive priorization, piping and the whole shebang) 
as system software.  As they mentioned "TOS on ROM" and neglected 
to  put "on ROM" behind "MultiTOS" we'll just have to  assume  it 
will  be supplied on disk (which is not too bad as I  suppose  it 
can be installed on hard disk as well).

 So  far  the  software.  The leaflet also  mentioned  some  more 
hardware  bits  that were sortof unknown so far  (at  least  they 
were unknown to yours truly).  The MIDI ports,  for example,  now 
have their own interrupts (not via the keyboard processor).  With 
little  external hardware you can fax and modem with  the  Falcon 
(no  expensive  external modem needed).  The SCSI II port  has  a 
maximum data transfer rate of 4 Mb/second;  the internal IDE hard 
disk bus has one of 3 Mb/second (the old DMA reached a maximum of 
1.3 Mb/second).  The Dutch Falcons will also have the 65 Mb  hard 
disk built in and 4 Mb of memory,  and their price will be around 
2700 Dutch guilders.  The custom chip I previously called "Combo" 
turns  out  to be called "Combel".  Other custom  chips  are  the 
"Videl"  (soft  scrolling,  overlay  mode  and  all  other  video 
functions),  the  "SDMA"  (does the sound DMA)  and  the  "CODEC" 
(which has the 16 bit AD/DA converters in it).

 Now I'd like to look more extensively at the video modi, as they 
were sortof complicated (or at least seemed to be) before.
 It seems that some modi are reserved strictly for VGA  monitors, 
and  others  strictly  for  TV/monitor  (SC  1224  and  SC  1435, 
composite video).
 The  video system is quite flexible.  With VGA monitors you  can 
(among others) have 320 or 640 pixels horizontal,  and 240 or 480 
pixels  vertical.  You can also select 1,  2,  4 or 8 bit  planes 
(corresponding  with  2,  4,  16 or 256 colours possible  on  the 
screen  at  the same time).  All combinations are  possible  with 
these values!
 With so-called broadcast monitors (i.e. TV and non-VGA monitors) 
you can have (among others) 600 or 400 pixels horizontal and  200 
or 400 vertical - again with 1,  2,  4 or 8 bitplanes. With these 
broadcast  monitors  you can specify an overscan of  up  to  20%, 
making  a  resolution of 768x480 the best you can get  (which  is 
quite enough if you ask me).  The palette is 262.144 colours  (so 
there's plenty of colours to pick from).
 All possible resolution combinations (excluding the 640x480  VGA 
one,  as  the  bandwith  would be too  big,  or  not  enough,  or 
whatever) can support true colour.  This means that you  suddenly 
get 16 bit planes, i.e. 65536 colours on screen at the same time. 
You  have  no colour palette then,  by the way - it  works  quite 
differently.
 Short  explanation of this true colour mode:  You can  assign  a 
colour  value to each pixel,  the format  being  RRRRRGGGGGGBBBBB 
(yes, 5 of each except for green that has 6). This mode is called 
the  slideshow  mode,  in case you were  interested.  It  is  not 
supported by the VDI.
 Why the six greens?
 Well,  you can switch off one of the greens (the last one) which 
then gets down to 15 bits per pixel with the green being replaced 
by an overlay bit which allows titling and genlock effects.  This 
allows 32,768 colours to be used.  This 15 bits per pixel mode is 
supported by the VDI, by the bye.
 All  in  all,  the  stuff mentioned here already  gets  down  to 
literally dozens of different resolution possibilities,  some  of 
which  are the ST ones and the TT ones (the latter excluding  the 
TT high res one).

 I guess I will now really not write further stuff until I get my 
hands on one of these amazing machines!
 
WRONG AGAIN - THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1ST 1992, EARLY AFTERNOON
 

 It  seems that I have to wait for the Falcon yet.  The  deadline 
before  which  this  German guy had to supply me  with  a  Falcon 
passed  last night at 00:00 hours,  so I guess I've  been  conned 
once  more into believing things.  I guess most software  company 
managing  directors  (with  the  exception,  so  I've  heard,  of 
Microdeal's John Symes) are just a load of tossers who make  lots 
of hollow promises.
 But I digress.
 Today I obtained the latest "DBA Magazine",  a brilliant fellow- 
Dutch  disk magazine made by (tada!) the DBA.  I would  not  have 
mentioned  that  here if it hadn't been for the  fact  that  they 
mentioned  some more bits about the Falcon that I  either  didn't 
know or had forgot to mention in one of my earlier revealings  in 
this article.
 I will make a short addendum summary here.

 *   All the Falcon's RAM is fast RAM (16 Mhz), unlike the TT.

 *   HiSoft  will be doing a Falcon drawing program called  "True
     Paint".  This is not the program I had mentioned earlier  in
     the  'rumours' department,  as the would-be author  of  that
     particular rumoured program knows nothing about this and was
     as flummoxed at hearing about "True Paint" as I was.

 That's all,  really,  but I did not want to reveal more. I could 
have  told you about the new Falcon XBIOS routines but I  decided 
against  that  for  two reasons:  1)  The  documentation  is  not 
definite  yet  (at  least  so told  me  Mr.  Kilwinger  of  Atari 
Benelux), and 2) It's rather useless information for 99% of you.
 
THE LAST BITS THEN? 

 So  my German distributor is certainly not very  trustworthy  to 
say the least. I think I'm going to be involved in some law suits 
here (all intiated by me).
 Next  time  ST  NEWS will be released I will  certainly  have  a 
Falcon. I will no doubt write more about it then.
 
AS A MATTER OF FACT... - MONDAY, OCTOBER 19TH 1992, EARLY EVENING

 Before  I  leave you all I would like to say some  more  things. 
Atari  reckon the Falcon should have sold about 200,000 units  by 
the end of 1993 - in the UK alone. Unfortunately the machine will 
also  be  sold  in a  1  megabyte,  no-hard-disk  version  there, 
retailing at £499.  The real version (let's pray that NOBODY BUYS 
THAT OTHER ONE
) should be available at £899.
 One last bit about my German distributor: He contacted me at the 
day  of a new deadline and we agreed to postpone the deadline  to 
November 15th. We'll just have to see.
 
DEFINITELY FINAL LAST BITS - THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12TH, AFTERNOON

 This  afternoon  I was called by the German  distributor  of  my 
virus killer. He reckoned the Falcon would not be available until 
March  at  the earliest,  so he decided to pay  me  my  royalties 
instead.
 So things seem to have turned out not too bad.  The Falcon  will 
have to wait another day.  It has been delayed,  by the way,  not 
because it wasn't finished but because all shopkeepers will first 
want to get rid of all their STs and ST software in stock  during 
the  Christmas  sales  (which will basically mean  they  will  be 
selling  dated machines to the audience,  basically screwing  the 
consumer - tough shit).
 Politics make me vomit. 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.