Skip to main content
© Niklas 'Tanis of TCB' Malmqvist

 "The world is full of willing people, some willing to work, some
willing to let them."
                                                     Robert Frost


                OBVIOUSLY INFLUENCED BY THE DEVIL
                             PART II
                      by Richard Karsmakers

 "HMMM, THAT'S BETTER"
 Mr.  Smith  grinned smugly to himself,  opening and closing  his
front door repeatedly,  listening to the  marrow-of-bones-slicing
sound  of  its hinges the same way an orchestra  conductor  would
listen to the triangle part of a musical piece.  This was better.
More like, well, more like home.
 "POTENT STUFF," he muttered,  satisfied,  looking with appraisal
at the Instant-O-Rust™ aerosol.
 He  had barely walked back in closed the door behind him -  once
more  admiring his own work when the whine of the  hinges  caused
the hall mirror to crack in two - when the doorbell rang.
 "NOW  WHO WOULD THAT BE?" he mused,  click-clicking back to  the
door.
 When   he  opened  it  he  could  once  more  not  contain   his
satisfaction at hearing the ghastly noise.  The dog that had just
shitted  on the "welcome" doormat had rather a different  opinion
about the sound.
 "Don't  you  recognize  me?"  the  dog  said,   looking  at  him
expectantly.  Mr. Smith had seen his share of weird things in his
former,  if  you could refer to it as such,  job.  An  expectant-
looking dog wasn't one of them.
 "NO,  I  DON'T  BELIEVE  I HAVE A TALKING WONDER  DOG  AMONG  MY
ACQUAINTANCES,"  said  Mr.  Smith  after  some  painfully  silent
seconds had crawled by. "BELIEVE ME, I DON'T HAVE MANY FRIENDS SO
I'M RATHER CERTAIN," he added as an afterthought.
 The  dog  chuckled in a barkish way.  It went all  liquid  brown
stuff, then transformed itself into a word.
 "GREAT?" Mr. Smith wondered.
 "Yes,"  a mouth appearing in the top half of the "A"  spoke,  "I
should think it's pretty obvious."
 Apparently  it  wasn't.  More rather  painfully  silent  seconds
ensued.  The "A" muttered something under its breath,  then  went
all bubbly brown liquid again, transforming itself into a leech.
 Mr.   Smith  still  wore  the  by  now  familiar  expression  of
befuddlement.
 "I AM VERY SORRY," he apologized, "BUT NO."
 The  word  melted to the ground in a puddle that  looked  almost
totally,  but not quite,  like diarrhoea.  From it the form of  a
stunningly  beautiful girl erected itself,  slowly.  It  had  the
wrong colour initially, but after the proper curves and that sort
of  thing had meticulously shaped themselves,  that also  changed
into  a  gorgeously tanned skin the kind of  which  one  normally
finds  draped around awesomely lovely females.  Some of the  more
private  parts were covered by an alpine blue swimming suit  that
seemed  made almost large enough not quite to burst.  Around  her
body hung a banner that read "Miss Life".
 She  sighed.  Obviously,  the transformation had taken a lot  of
energy.
 Mr.  Smith sighed,  too.  He felt himself trying to cope with  a
feeling he had never had before.  Due to his anatomy,  or  rather
the extreme lack of any of its soft bits,  he found it  difficult
to concentrate the feeling somewhere.  He found himself  grinding
his teeth, which was something he was good at.
 "I  THINK  I  WOULD HAVE REMEMBERED YOU,"  he  said  eventually,
"YOU'RE NOT...ER...THE SORT OF PERSON ONE WOULD TEND TO FORGET."
 "I  am  Life,"  she revealed,  her voice husky  in  the  way  no
ordinary stunningly awesome girl's voice could ever manage to be,
"known by all, remembered by few."
 "AH," Mr. Smith said, "I SEE WE HAVE SOMETHING IN COMMON."
 She had breathtakingly magnificent collar bones.  He liked  that
in a girl.  If only he would have had to reap the soul of a  girl
like that once...things might have been different then.  He might
have had a soulmate - even though he had no soul for her to  mate
with.
 "Aren't  you going to invite me in?" Life said,  her voice  soft
like the velvet skin on the inside of a virgin's thighs.  It tore
Mr. Smith from his train of thoughts.
 "ER...YES,  OF COURSE," he stammered,  "DO COME IN." He  stepped
back to allow her in.  Life had done a pretty good job on its, or
her, appearance. Even the soft scent of her long blonde hair left
the impression of pine forests when it brushed him by.  Mr. Smith
caught  himself  thinking thoughts a man his age  was  no  longer
supposed to think.
 He closed the door, oblivious to any satisfaction the terrifying
cacophony  of creaking hinges might have given  him.  He  floated
behind her luscious form as it settled in a comfortable couch  in
his living room. He saw her hand sprout a wine glass, that slowly
filled itself with a dark-red liquid.
 "I hear you've retired," she said, her voice reminiscent of soft
winds brushing through summer meadows. Mr. Smith nodded his head.
 "I  also hear you've let some dim-wit mercenary annex hired  gun
take over," she added,  her voice rather too much like the  sound
of dead insect legs brushing against fallen autumn leaves  during
the onset of a gale. She sipped from her glass of wine.
 "WELL," Mr.  Smith said,  "DEATH IS THE OTHER SIDE.  HE'S  SMART
NOW.  INTELLIGENT.  QUITE  THE  CONTRARY TO WHAT HE  WAS  BEFORE,
HE'S..."
 "...quite  pacifist,  too," Life finished,  "Terence,  which  is
what he calls himself now,  doesn't actually want to kill  anyone
if he can possibly avoid it."
 The  expression  of amazed flummoxedness  on  Mr.  Smith's  face
changed into the beginning of an embarrassed one.
 "BUT...," he said,  and thought better of it. You can talk about
life,  but not with it. You can converse with the living, but not
with Life. It's like trying to speak with the dead.
 He gathered courage and tried anyway.
 "I'VE  BEEN IN THE REAPING LINE OF WORK FOR TOO LONG," he  said,
"I  CAN'T FOR THE LIFE OF ME IMAGINE PEOPLE WANTING TO DO IT  FOR
THAT LONG. NOT ON YOUR LIFE. I WANTED TO COME TO LIFE.
 Life  looked at him.  It was an accusing stare infinitely  worse
than  that of a woman whose firstborn twins you've just run  down
with  a  combine  harvester.  Good thing Mr.  Smith  had  in  his
previous  occupation  insisted on using scythes -  he  had  never
heard of combine harvesters or any other newfangled  agricultural
gadgets.
 He wondered what Cronos,  or Terence,  or whatever name the  man
had given himself, was doing now...

 Terence sat in the central hall of his new abode. In the hearth,
a  fire  was flaming away happily.  He had put up  his  feet  and
simply sat,  staring at some undefined point in space.  Sometimes
his instinct would tell him someone's soul had to be reaped -  he
would feel a peculiar absence of something which would each  time
reach  out,  execute  and  return  to base  within  a  matter  of
microseconds.
 About half an hour ago he had had to reap a wizard's soul, which
had been dramatically different.  Death has to turn up in  person
for important deaths,  or at least those deemed important by some
arcane law or other - cats, wizards and penguins. This particular
wizard,  a  wizened old man who seemed to have spent at  least  a
decade  with  one  foot  in the  grave  already,  had  not  liked
Terence's looks.  Too,  hum,  much ham on the, hum, bone, the old
mage had snorted accusingly,  just before Terence had reluctantly
decapitated  the  man with an audible TWANG of  his  sharpest  of
scythes.
 In the library,  the German-built floating library filing system
had  gone through the ever repetitive but apparently not  at  all
boring routine of removing a book, creating a new tome of history
and filling the hourglass with a specific amount of finest  sand.
This specific old magician reincarnated as a witch,  which says a
lot about the Germans' sense of humour.
 Terence got up and walked to and fro,  guilt-ridden.  He knew he
had  once truly relished the taste of death,  that he had  simply
loved killing people and any other sentient beings, preferably at
random.  He  remembered  the adrenalin rush  he  had  experienced
before pulling triggers,  pushing buttons and flicking  switches.
Now he just felt nauseated.  He tried not to think of him  having
to  be  Death for millenium after  millenium,  aeon  after  aeon.
Regular  kills could be coped with.  He had even learned  not  to
wake  up  anymore when it happened.  But wizards...he  had  never
known there were so many blasted wizards around,  nor that  there
were such an enormous amount of cats,  each with nine lives!  And
penguins...he  hadn't  realised the hole in the ozone  layer  was
killing them in such large quantities.  All these creatures found
it necessary to start pushing up daisies virtually all the  time,
making it quite impossible to, say, take a day off.
 He  had considered going on strike,  but had been afraid of  the
consequences.  'No  death' automatically meant 'too  much  life'.
Before  you  knew it,  you had inanimate objects dancing  in  the
streets,   trolleys  terrorizing  mankind.  He'd  read  about  it
somewhere, and hadn't liked it.
 This Death business,  which had seemed quite brilliant at start,
hadn't turned out for the better. And the worst thing was that he
couldn't get used to the expression in the people whose souls  he
was about to reap.
 Genuine surprise.
 He  wandered into his bedroom.  He had not yet gotten  round  to
examining former Death's wardrobe,  so he absent-mindedly  opened
its doors.
 It  was hard not to be sucked in.  It seemed like a  black  hole
compared to which other black holes looked like disco spotlights.
It was filled with dark robes, all of them identical.
 Death  hadn't  merely been unfashionable - he'd  been  seriously
defashionable in quite an utter way.  And the robes weren't  just
black.  They  were the opposite of white light and then  out  the
other way
.
 There  was only one source of light in the yawning  recesses  of
the enormous wardrobe. Well, it wasn't actually light as such, it
was  just that the deepest black of the door at the back  of  the
cupboard  was infinitely more like purest white than the rest  of
its contents.
 It was little. The kind of door on which fits a little key.
 Terence fumbled in his pockets. He found the keyring and touched
the small credit card that was attached to it. He took it out and
tried it.
 The  small  door  opened with a sound  that  sent  shivers  down
Terence's every sensory nerve.
 He had expected utter blackness beyond it.
 He had been quite right.  Except for the golden chariot with its
six flaming horses.
 He stepped through.

 "SO YOU MEAN HE'S NO GOOD AT...ER...THE JOB?" Mr. Smith asked.
 The form of the prodigiously exquisite female had been  replaced
by  that  of the talking wonder dog again.  Life  found  it  less
strenuous and, anyway, life's a bitch.
 "Not yet," the dog answered, "But he will be soon."

 "Good afternoon," a robed figure at the reigns said.
 "Hi," a red, horned figure chimed in.
 The horses didn't even as much as whinny.  Probably,  they  were
too busy just being aflame.
 "Hop in, dude," the horned little chap said, happily.
 "Yes, do,"the robed person added, rather more formally.
 Terence  opened  the chariot's door and  entered.  Its  interior
turned out to be as golden as the outside.
 Before he knew it,  both the robed and the horned figures  moved
the  reigns,  setting the chariot in motion.  Quickly  it  gained
momentum. Shortly afterwards it seemed to be floating, or flying.
He glanced out of the window to see stars rushing by.
 He picked up a leaflet captioned "Elizium Tours", published by a
company called 'Devilishly Divine Inc'.  It had a picture of  his
two coachmen on the cover.  They were both smiling broadly -  the
red one fumbling his barbed tail, the other his beard.
 Terence had actually expected music.  Bach,  perhaps, or Chopin.
Possibly even a touch of Vangelis.  He hadn't quite expected  Joe
Satriani's  "One Big Rush".  After a while,  just when  the  good
guitar bit started,  the music faded away.  A pre-recorded  voice
spoke.
 "Welcome to 'Elizium Tours', brought to you by Devilishly Divine
Incorporated,  the company that *nobody* deemed possible. We have
done all possible - and not just the *humanly* possible,  ha ha -
to  bring  you  a  tour  of which the  memory  will  last  you  a
*lifetime*!"
 The  voice  remained unheard for a while,  during which  one  of
those  typical Wagnerian bits of music was played.  When it  once
more faded away another voice spoke.
 "We are sure thou hast not yet experienced anything like this in
thy  life.  Now,  thy death will start off with the most  amazing
experience  thinkable.  Thou wilst visit the realm of  hereafter,
Valhalla, Heaven ('Or hell!', another voice yelled frantically in
the  background),  the Great Plains,  the Eternal  Honeyjar,  the
Realm of the Dead, the Dungeon Dimensions...Elizium..."
 There  was another while of silence.  As if on  cue,  the  first
couple of bars of Beethoven's Fifth were played.  Then the  voice
returned.
 "Do fasten thy seatbelts, and please refrain from smoking."
 A 'click' signalled the end of the pre-recorded message. Terence
discovered no seatbelts. Stars flashed by ever faster, until they
became nothing more than blurry lines.

 "WHAT DO YOU MEAN?" Mr. Smith asked.
 "Have you told him," the dog inquired, "about the small key?"
 "YES.  MOST DISTINCTLY. CRONOS WARCHILD WOULD NEVER DISOBEY ME."
He  was absolutely certain about it.  "I AM LIKE HIS SUPERIOR  TO
HIM," he added with confidence.
 "To Cronos Warchild you are,  yes," the dog sneered  derisively,
"but not to Terence."
 Mr.  Smith had a naturally pale complexion, partly accounted for
by  the  contrast of off-white bone on the  darkest  of  blackest
robes. Nonetheless it became rapidly paler, at which even the dog
couldn't help but gaze in intense bewilderment.
 "IF...IF...IF HE DOES THAT..." Mr. Smith stuttered.
 "...even Death may die," the dog finished for him.

 The  journey  didn't take long,  but nobody could guess  at  the
distance  the  fiery chariot had covered,  not  even  when  taken
wildly.  The  stars were no longer visible and instead there  was
something like fog - only much,  much more intense, as if someone
had put a whole world of clouds in a can.
 Terence opened the chariot door and stepped out.  The air was of
a  totally different quality,  though he couldn't quite  put  his
finger on it. There was a sign that appeared to float before him.
 Please  don't litter,  it said,  Don't urinate,  spit  or  throw
anything down. Thank you.
 "Don't forget your tour guides,  dude," a voice suddenly  called
from  above.  Terence turned around to look into the eyes of  the
horny red coachman. He had his hand extended, palm up.
 Terence  fumbled  in  some pockets and  eventually  retrieved  a
couple of thousand dollars in Monopoly money. The little red chap
took it greedily, gave his bearded colleague a good 100 bucks and
pocketed the rest, grinning inanely.
 "Have fun,  pal," the little man said, then cackled weirdly. The
chariot was turned around and began to disappear in the distance.
The bearded guy cast a last glance at Terence,  a hint of sadness
in  his  eyes.  Mere seconds later the chariot was just  a  small
fiery  speck  below,  not  much bigger than the  stars  until  it
totally vanished.
 He  was in heaven all right.  Not just metaphorically  speaking,
but quite literally.  He stood on soft clouds that required  some
getting used to in order for him to be able to walk.  In the  end
he managed.
 There was a large gate,  built in Greek style.  He approached it
uncertainly.  Why  had Death expressly forbidden the use  of  the
small  key?  Could his entering this mysterious  Elizium  perhaps
have  some vile consequences?  He didn't know.  The  unknown  had
never attracted Cronos Warchild - but it most certainly exercised
a most powerful form of incitement on Terence.  He brushed  aside
any mental obstructions and entered the Domain.
 He  entered  what  seemed  like  an  entirely  different  world,
contained  in  what might just as well be an  entirely  different
universe.  He stood amid high grass that covered a hilltop.  When
he  looked  down  he saw a small  village  where  thin,  unstable
lines  of smoke ascended from picturesque chimneys.  There was  a
forest beyond it, and more hills. Much further in the distance he
saw true mountains,  their tops shrouded in clouds and snow. When
he  looked behind him to where he had come from his  heart  froze
for an instant.
 There  was no gate,  nor anything like it.  There  were  another
small village or two,  some more patches of trees, and a blue sea
in the far distance.
 He had no idea where he had arrived.
 "Wow," he gasped.
 He also felt very different. This, so it turned out, was largely
due  to  the  fact  that his  clothes  had  changed.  He  wore  a
designer leopard-patterned loincloth of sorts.  He also found his
body changed.  It was broad and muscular, hairy where it ought to
be. Mysteriously, a hearing aid had attached itself to one of his
ears.  Obviously,  he had changed back to his old self. He didn't
know why - but,  then again, he didn't know a lot for he was paid
to fight and not to think.
 "Hmpf," he snorted.

 Mr.  Smith  was cleaning up dog shit.  He had  preferred  Life's
girl  form much more - if not for the fact that it just  happened
to be most aesthetically pleasing,  at least she didn't shit  and
wee-wee  all  over the place.  He had just finished  washing  his
spectral hands when the doorbell rang again.
 "WHO  WILL  IT BE THIS TIME?" he thought aloud as he  once  more
click-clicked to the door.
 He  opened  it and looked out.  He frowned at the sound  of  the
hinges - there wasn't any. He saw fresh grease on them. Or was it
dog's urine?
 There was nobody to be seen except for a cyclist passing by that
suddenly,  subconsciously  and for no apparent reason,  found  it
necessary to peddle faster.
 "Hey!" a voice yelled.
 Mr.  Smith looked around once more,  somewhat more intense  this
time. His astral hearing told him someone had cried at the top of
his voice - still, it had been all but silence.
 "Yo! Down here!" the voice insisted.
 Mr.  Smith looked down.  He saw nothing except for a very  small
goblin  that  was jumping up and  down  frenetically.  He  didn't
actually see it as such, for even Death has filters built in that
tell him not to believe his senses when seeing things that  don't
exist.  Tiny crying goblins were among them, right next to purple
elephants and friendly tax collectors.
 There was a brief smell of ozone,  a spell of smoke and a  short
crash of thunder.
 In  front  of  Death  stood a man that  seemed  older  than  the
universe  itself.  It  seemed  as  if  he  could  barely  refrain
himself  from  fading away.  He wore a pale blue  robe  that  was
almost  transparent  insofar that you could just  about  see  the
trees through it and him.  A beard was slung across his  shoulder
and  still brushed the ground.  On the man's hat sat  a  sundial,
around  his wrists hung several watches.  In one hand he held  an
hourglass  of an extraordinary quality even Death had never  seen
before.  Never,  that is, except for one time - a very, very long
time ago.
 "FATHER?" Mr. Smith gasped, incredulously.
 "Yes, son," the most ancient man said, his breath almost failing
to  pronounce  the words,  like an infant failing to blow  out  a
torch.
 "FATHER,  IS  THAT REALLY YOU?" Mr.  Smith repeated,  still  not
capable of believing it was really his progenitor - Time.
 The  man  nodded.  A  tear  welled up in  an  eye  but  remained
invisible - naturally transparent liquids excreted by almost see-
through people generally tend not to be all too detectable.
 "FATHER!" Mr.  Smith cried,  and embraced Time as tenderly as is
possible when you're basically a bunch of bones held together  by
a robe as dark as a black hole with broken headlights.
 Time nodded,  glancing at a couple of wristwatches nervously. He
ticked on one of them and cursed below his breath.
 "I  have little time,  son," the old man sighed,  "for the  time
being  I've been able to take some time off to take time  by  the
forelock."
 "UH?" Mr. Smith frowned.
 "I've  come  to give a timely warning,  son,"  the  ancient  man
breathed, "I hope I'm in time, that it's not yet too late."
 "WHAT ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT, DAD?"
 Time winced.  "Father,  son, father," the vintage figure panted,
"Let's not get too colloquial at this time,  we've got to keep up
appearances.  For the time being,  at least.  We've done so since
time out of mind."
 "WHAT ABOUT IT, FATHER?"
 "The new Death,  son," Time puffed,  "isn't doing well. He's got
little time left."
 "FATHER...YOU MEAN..."
 "Yes."
 "THE SMALL DOOR?"
 "They already brought him to Elizium."
 "THEY HAVE?"
 "They have."
 "SHIT."
 "Indeed."
 There was a silence as heavy as a planet.
 "THERE  GOES  MY  DREAM,  FATHER,"  Mr.  Smith  said,  "GOODBYE,
FLORIDA. GOODBYE, CONDO."
 "Death should not go there. Duty calls for you."
 "YES."
 Time glanced at a watch, then at another.
 "Oh heavens, the time!" Time exclaimed, voice filled with panic,
"Have to fly. Sort things out, will you?"
 "CERTAINLY,  FATHER," Mr. Smith said solemnly, "WE WOULDN'T WANT
THEM TO TAKE OVER, WOULD WE?"
 Time nodded, then started to fade away.
 "Bye, son."
 "BYE...DAD."
 A muted curse drifted across the borders of time and space.

 A  fresh  wind entered Terence's nostrils.  He  hated  it.  He'd
rather smell diesel fumes or toxic waste any day.  The sun played
tricks  on his hair,  like black flames of shadow moving  in  the
breeze.  He  hated the sun.  He'd much as rather have  fog,  dark
clouds and the kind of drizzle that soaks the very marrow of your
bones.  There  were  cute little birds sitting on  tree  branches
singing  positively  lovely evening serenades.  He  hated  bloody
birds singing bloody evening serenades.  He'd prefer the sound of
soiled steam engines or the cacophony of a blood-stained massacre
any time.  There were brightly coloured flowers along the path on
which he stood. He hated bright colours. He got off on drab grey,
and  there was no shade he loved more than the mixture  of  colon
contents and gastric acids.  He kicked some off them. Petals flew
off.
 So this was Elizium.  The Hereafter. It was even worse than what
mythology  had  made of it.  He had a familiar sensation  in  his
guts, the kind of feeling that told him to find something and eat
it,  even  if  it wasn't particularly  edible.  A  squirrel  just
happened to fit the bill.  A hand flashed,  followed by the sound
of a tiny neck breaking.
 He  jumped  to  alertness when he heard  the  sound  of  someone
whistling  a tune,  somewhere behind him.  It came  closer.  From
behind  a  copse  appeared a rather effeminate  chap  holding  an
apple.  He appeared not to notice Terence and came  closer.  Just
when  Terence was about to do something  rather  aggressive,  the
chap held sideways the arm with the apple and put the back of his
free hand against his own forehead.
 "To be or not to be..." he cried, "that is the question!"
 Terence looked at the man, dumbfounded.
 "To  be or not to be..." the other now repeated,  "that  is  the
question!"
 Dumbfoundness was still omnipotently present on Terence's  face.
The people of Elizium were some severely weird dudes.
 "It's not even a question," Terence remarked, matter-of-fact.
 The man looked at him in horror, utterly shocked.
 "I'm  Bill Tremblepike Junior,  the famous playwright," he  said
proudly, "and whom might you be?"
 "Terence," Terence said. He felt his name lacked something. Yes,
it lacked ambi ants.  He didn't quite know how to add it, though,
so that's what he left it at.
 The man took a snuffbox from within one of his ruffled  sleeves.
He  opened  the little shiny thing and took from  it  some  white
powder. He held it under his nose and sniffed.
 Terence had seen this before,  of course, back when he was still
alive  and had to try and find his livelihood  (and,  often,  his
American  Express  Traveller's  Cheques) in  the  slums  of  many
metropolises  around  the  universe.  People  who  sniffed  white
powder  were weaklings who could resist anything but  temptation,
people who were too futile to cope with reality and instead chose
to  flee  from it in some sort of self-styled hell  -  chop  your
breakfast on a mirror, that sort of thing.
 Obviously  the white powder had gotten to the effeminate  chap's
head  already:  He  walked  past  Terence,  nose  up,  completely
ignoring  him,  rambling  on about his father's  supposed  death,
guilt, and his mother.
 The real world,  as far as Terence was concerned,  had certainly
become  a better place the moment this guy had started his  final
voyage. If Elizium was full of fruitcakes like this he was in for
something.
 He decided to walk to one of the villages where he reckoned  the
smoke that arose from the chimneys,  in some delicate way of  its
own,  resembled belches of industrial fumes - provided you  would
let your imagination run away with them.
 The streets were empty,  as if it was a ghost town.  There was a
sound of people, however, that came from behind a door that stood
ajar.  The word "Inn" was written above it. Terence could already
imagine feeling at home here.  Any place that had an inn couldn't
possibly be too bad.
 He was about to have his opinions drastically revised.
 He walked in.  The sound of people drinking and talking  stopped
quite  instantly.  It wasn't that they disliked strangers - as  a
matter  of  fact they tended to like them a lot as  they  usually
brought  exciting  tales  from  distant  Elizian  corners.   This
particular stranger, however, wore a sufficient amount of nothing
to  be considered rude even to the weirdest and most  ill-dressed
of Elizians.
 They looked him over disapprovingly.  Suddenly,  he felt  rather
uncomfortable.  He looked down at his designer  leopard-patterned
loincloth.  The  sound of people drinking and talking filled  the
room again.
 The  gathering  of  townfolk was colourful  to  say  the  least.
Cronos' mind hadn't yet taken over fully,  so Terence  recognized
Marilyn Monroe,  Freddie Mercury, Napoleon Bonaparte, Vincent van
Gogh and Eve.  He felt slightly relieved when he saw Adam's girl,
for she wore only a maple leaf before her nether parts,  her hair
doing  a  good  job at covering various other  bits  that  needed
covering.
 "Gee," Terence said, "is Elvis here, too?"
 All  sounds  ceased  again,   and  the  people  looked  at   him
disapprovingly again.  It seemed to be a thing they liked doing a
lot.
 "Of course not," Terence muttered to himself,  "he was  abducted
by aliens."
 The girl in whom he had recognized Marilyn Monroe now came up to
him. From nowhere in particular, a draft tore at her white dress,
throwing it up a bit and displaying a lot of leg.
 "Oops," she giggled, "poo-poo-pee-doo."
 She  walked past him,  carrying with her the odour of  too  much
perfume.
 "Wait Mary!" the Napoleon clone said, "I don't want you to be my
Waterloo!" The man rushed past Terence,  out of the inn and after
her.
 "Mary's just taking advantage of Nappy O'Lion," the girl wearing
nothing but hair and a maple leaf remarked, "I guess it's a habit
that doesn't just stop when you die."
 "Would you mind speaking up, dear," the Van Gogh lookalike said,
"my hearing isn't quite what it used to be before I had my mental
breakdown."
 "Sure, Von Gogem," the First of Women sniggered.
 "Thanks Ms. Ning," the half-deaf, totally dead artist said, "And
to  return  the favour I'd like you to pose for  a  painting  I'm
doing at the moment."
 Ms. Ning blushed, flattered, and asked, "What's it called?"
 Von Gogem thought for a while.  He looked at Terence, then said,
"The Four Potato Eaters of the Apocalypse."
 "Funny name," the Freddie Mercury imitation whispered to someone
who sat nearby, "I wonder did he ssink of it himsself?"
 Von  Gogem looked sharply at the singer.  If he set his mind  to
it,  the artist heard much more than what most people thought  he
could.
 "Would  you  mind stepping  outside,  Mr.  Silver?"  the  ageing
painter said.
 The  singer  looked  at  the other with  an  air  of  arrogance,
stroking his ridiculous moustache,  then said,  "Ssure.  Why not.
Who wantss to live forever?"
 Before  he knew it,  Terence was quite  alone.  Obviously,  most
people  found  it more interesting to witness a good  fist  fight
rather  than  gaze at the loincloth that was,  to put  it  midly,
showing  rather  a lot of what were definitely  genitals  of  the
proportions he had missed when checking himself over earlier that
day.
 More  confident  of himself,  he walked outside to see  how  the
fight was going down.
 The streets were empty.  It seemed like some kind of dream where
you follow someone around a corner or outside a room and suddenly
that someone turned out no longer to be there.  The same kind  of
dream  where you try to walk home but just find yourself  walking
the  wrong  way,  the  sort of dream where you try  to  run  away
from  something  but don't quite manage to  increase  your  speed
beyond that of a leisure stroll.
 At the instant the thought had finished,  an old man came around
the  corner.  He sat in a wheelchair and looked  remarkably  much
like  Marlon Brando.  The man stopped his wheelchair just  before
Terence and looked up.
 "I'm  Don  Quattro Stagioni," he said,  his voice as  hoarse  as
rasped  limestone and as polluted with an Italian accent as  that
of your average pizza parlour boss.
 "Well,  er...I'm Terence," Terence said. Again he felt something
lacking, so he added, "The famous playwright."
 The Don fumbled his chin with one hand.  His other hand  fumbled
with something below the blanket that covered his lap and legs.
 "You're  not  dead," the Don  said,  puzzled,  "but  you're  not
exactly alive either."
 Other  people  were arriving on the scene now.  He  saw  someone
looking like Einstein,  a French woman carrying her head and Bill
Tremblepike as well.  The latter looked rather spaced out.  There
were  other people that looked as if they had been rather  famous
when they'd been alive, but Cronos' old brain was taking over too
much to enable Terence to tie them to any names.  There was a guy
dressed  in khaki colours with a ridiculous toothbrush  moustache
and lank black hair.  Another man had the same sort of  moustache
but  was  dressed in black and a bowler hat  instead.  His  shoes
seemed too large, too.
 The  Don  craned back his neck to whisper with someone  who  had
appeared  behind him.  It was a rather fat,  squat man smoking  a
thick  cigar.  Terence couldn't make out what they  were  talking
about,  but he did hear words like 'terminate', 'Death', 'threat'
and 'now'.
 A  tiny  voice in the back of his mind,  probably  part  of  his
mercenary  instincts that were taking over again,  told him  that
these people might not want to be friends.  At least not until he
was actually dead.
 The  blanket  was lifted from Don  Quattro  Stagioni's  lap.  It
revealed one of those gangster-type of machine guns.
 "Obviously,"  Terence said,  feeling his grip on  the  situation
slipping  away like an eel in a bucket of nose  excreta,  "you're
not happy to see me."

 This would have been the ideal spot to terminate the  story,  or
at  least this particular cluster of paragraphs.  As it  happens,
however,  something happened at that precise  instant.  Something
that does not warrant an empty line to be included, even.

 This was what happened.
 There  was a sudden gust of wind.  They all looked around as  if
drawn  by a supernatural force - which was probably not  all  too
far from the truth.  On the protruding,  darkly silhouetted crest
of a hill sky stood an even darker figure.  A robe flapped around
him  in  the  wind,  in his hands he held  an  agricultural  tool
usually associated with departing - in the metaphorical sense  of
the word.
 "Wow. Drama," someone whispered below his breath.
 Just  to emphasize things,  the wind increased  sufficiently  to
transform  the gently flapping of the black robe  into  something
rather menacing.
 Shivers went down a whole lot of spines.
 "Any moment now there'll be a..."
 There was a crack of lightning.  It was soundless.  By the  time
all eyes had grown used to the darkness again,  the robed  figure
had disappeared from the hillcrest.
 Death had never visited Elizium.  Not the real Death,  at least.
He just gave people a complimentary one-way ticket,  sponsored by
Devilishly Divine Inc.  He had decided today would have to be  an
exception. Either this, or they would take over.
 Elizians had no natural affection towards Death.  They had  even
considerably  less  of an affection towards the  concept  of  the
Reaper actually being in town.  All of them had met him once, and
none of them cared to have the occasion repeated.
 As if nature had held her breath all the time,  enthralled,  she
now  suddenly  decided to unleash the sound of thunder  that  had
belonged  to  the flash of lightning.  It  would  definitely  not
suffice merely to tell it was pretty damn loud.  It was the sound
of  dinosaur  herds  trampling  off,   frightened  by  continents
crashing   into   each  other  and   mountains   erupting   quite
spontaneously,  the sky filled with a squadron of  post-speed-of-
sound jets that had decided quite conveniently to break the sound
barrier at a location somewhere right between your ears.
 The  silence  that ensued was just as intense as that  which  it
followed.  No bird dared utter a sound,  no wolves dared even  to
howl.  The wind had died.  Grass lay limp,  trees stood leafless.
Around  Terence  lay a couple of people,  clutching  their  ears,
whimpering.
 "TERENCE,"  a  voice like dried bones in Sahara  sand  whispered
close to Terence's ear.  There was no reaction.  Terence stood as
immovable as a Sodomic pillar of salt. Mr. Smith laid a bony hand
on Terence's shoulder.
 "Oh," Terence said, looking around, "I thought it would be you."
 He turned a knob behind his ear.
 "That was quite a noise, it was," he chuckled, "good thing I had
my hearing aid turned down."
 Mr. Smith nodded, then looked levelly.
 "THAT'S NOT WHAT I CAME HERE FOR," he said.
 "No?"
 "NOT QUITE, NO."
 There was a tiny 'clunk' of a coin dropping.  Terence fumbled in
his pockets, only to find nothing.
 "IS  THIS  WHAT YOU'RE LOOKING FOR?" Mr.  Smith  asked.  He  had
always loved rhetorics.  Two spectral fingers held a small credit
card  before Terence's nose,  the rest of the key ring and  other
credits  card  bungling below it.  He had  always  loved  picking
pockets, too.
 Terence  stared  at the limp grass,  at a  loss  for  words.  He
experienced  a most nauseating feeling he couldn't remember  ever
having felt before. It was guilt.
 "I TOLD YOU NOT TO USE IT."
 "But..."
 "YOU DID ANYWAY."
 "Yes, but..."
 "YOU HAVE DISOBEYED ME, TERENCE. NOBODY HAS DONE THAT BEFORE AND
DIED TO TELL ABOUT IT."
 "Yes, but, you see..."
 "SHUT UP."
 Terence shut up.  It was a wise thing to do. Mr. Smith stared at
him.  Terence  had  never  thought two empty  eye  sockets  could
inflict so much wrath.
 "YOU HAVE ENTERED ELIZIUM.  YOU'VE NEARLY CAUSED DEATH TO DIE. I
HOPE YOU REALIZE WHAT THE CONSEQUENCES WILL BE."
 "Er?"
 "YOU WILL NO LONGER BE DEATH."
 "Oh."
 "YOU WILL NO LONGER BE...IMMORTAL."
 There was a pause,  in which Terence tried to think.  What  with
Cronos'  brain having devolved to its old self  again,  this  was
hard.
 "So I will...er...die, basically?" he asked.
 "NO," Mr. Smith muttered, "I'M NOT ONE WHO CARRIES A GRUDGE."
 "I've noticed that," Terence said, "you seem rather keen on your
scythe instead."
 Mr.  Smith ground his teeth. It was something he was good at. He
had missed it, really. Grinding teeth came with the Death job. He
had missed the reaping business.  Maybe things had turned out for
the better anyway.
 It seemed as if Mr.  Smith,  no,  Death,  thought long and  hard
about something.
 "BACK TO EARTH THOU SHALT GO," Death intoned.
 Terence looked up.
 Death clicked his heels twice.  There was a short period of time
that seemed to extend itself across a long one.  Terence  thought
he heard an angry,  devilish voice yelling, "Told you it wouldn't
work,  dude!".  Another voice replied,  softly, "Eye guess that's
what humans call My will."
 After that,  more sounds came. There was the sound of flames and
horses, followed by thunder that rolled across the sky. There was
the  sound  of wings beating the air fervently,  of  insect  legs
touching jar edges. He closed his eyes when the colours came, but
it  was of no avail - they seemed to penetrate his eyelids as  if
they were as transparent as the robes of Time. At first there was
a  bright yellow colour,  then thick,  red fluid  dripped  across
everything. Then the whole thing faded away into utter blackness.

 When  Terence opened his eyes he heard the echo wearing  off  of
spectral  heels  clicking.  He  though he  could  hear  a  horse,
whinnying in the distance.
 "YOU'RE BACK," Death said, "WE ARE BACK."
 "I  see," Terence said.
 He  sat  on the ground,  holding a shiny samurai  sword  in  his
hands.  There weren't any blood stains on it.  Death loomed  over
him  in  what any other person would no doubt have  considered  a
pretty threatening way.
 "BACK IN TIME,  TOO," Death said,  pride in his voice for having
succeeded   in   bending   the   fabric   of   space   and   time
sufficiently without his dad appearing to have noticed.
 "You mean I didn't kill myself?"
 Death slowly shook his head.
 "NOT YET," he said.
 "Gee," Terence said, somewhat aghast, "er...well...thanks."
 "I GUESS WE COULD CALL IT QUITS NOW."
 "Yeah," Terence said.  Cronos' mind was taking over.  Every  bit
that had been Terence was now slowly taking off.
 "GOOD LUCK," Death said. Grinning, he added, "HAPPY HUNTING."
 A spark lit in Cronos' eyes.  Or perhaps it was the setting  sun
gleaming off his hearing aid - it was hard to tell.
 "Right."
 "BYE, TERENCE."
 There was a brief lapse of silence.
 "No,  not Terence," the mercenary annex hired gun said, "Cronos,
if you don't mind."
 He  walked off into the sunset.  A poor lonesome  mercenary  far
away from home.

          THIS IS NOT THE END. IT'S JUST THE BEGINNING. 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.