Skip to main content
© Dave 'Spaz of TLB' Moss

 "Q: Why aren't blondes good cattle herders?
  A: Because they can't even keep two calves together!"


     THE QUEST FOR THE PURIFICATION OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
                             PART IV
                     (AND THE LAST ONE, TOO)
                      by Richard Karsmakers

 By  now you should know that I started studying English back  in
September 1991.  During the first months of this academic  career
already  I  found out I was making lots of mistakes where  I  had
naively thought none existed.  I had been mixing up words,  words
with the wrong meanings and wrong plural forms.  I'd been  making
lots  of  other mistakes,  too,  so it's safe to say that  I  had
committed  blasphemy  against what I consider to be  the  richest
language mankind possesses.  I decided the time was ripe to bring
all that to a halt.

 My purpose behind writing this series was twofold.  Basically  I
hoped to make you all aware of English, and most particularly the
proper way in which it is written.  Also,  I hoped I'd get better
at it myself if I tried to tell you how it was done.

 No doubt to the considerable joy of many of you out there,  this
will  be  the final part of the series.  I've noticed  that  this
columns  each time turned out to be the last one I had to  write,
and that I also disliked doing it more and more. I do ST NEWS for
fun,  I want to write for fun.  That's why this will be the  last
occurrence  of  this series,  also because I  don't  think  it'll
continue to fit in our new "Multi Media" setup (see "Editorial").
 During  the  last two years I have made notes of  all  kinds  of
things  that I was still wanting to write  something  about,  and
that's why this last occurrence will have a miriad of topics, all
discussed  rather  more briefly than usual.  I  hope,  with  this
column, to have contributed a small something to better awareness
of English.

 Rather  important  note:  To  many of you this  column  will  be
boring. If you are one of these many, then quit now. Pressing F10
will do the job.  You can also try UNDO,  I believe,  or  Escape.
There are no fun bits to be found at all this time.


All but

 To many non-English people,  "all but" may seem restricted to  a
meaning of "everything else except".  However, "all but" actually
means "almost". This issue of ST NEWS was all but finished when I
still had to do this column.
 If  you want to use "everything else except" then you'd have  to
use "everything but", like the band (Everything But The Girl).

Counting time

 The English really have a weird sense of counting. Not as warped
as  that  of the French ("three and two times twenty")  but  just
about.  For example,  a true British person would not say "half a
year". Rather, he'd use "6 months" instead. Similarly, they would
say "18 months" to "one and a half year".  Full years are treated
normally.

Verb/noun differences

 Especially  when  hearing some English verbs and  nouns  spoken,
they  may  seem  rather  identical (even  though  they  are  not,
actually).  Such  may happen with words like "contrained"  ("made
(sb) do sth by strong (moral) persuasion or by force",  not to be
confused with "restrained",  i.e.  "held back" or something)  and
"constraint"  ("sth  that  limits  or  restricts").  There  is  a
difference  when  these words are spoken  (voiced  and  voiceless
ending respectively),  but when written the differences are  even
more important.
 Usually it is easy to remember what is the verb and what is  the
noun. The past tense of the verb ends with "ed", the noun on "t".
There are more verb/noun combinations like this.

Amid & Among

 Some may thing that there's a difference between "amid"/"amidst"
and "among"/"amongst". Well, there isn't. They're both variations
of the same.

To Wake up or not to Awake

 Especially  to foreigners such as myself the difference  between
these  verbs  is difficult.  "Awake" means "(cause  a  person  or
animal to) stop sleeping",  and "wake up" means "stop  sleeping".
Do  note  the subtle differences:  You cannot wake  up  somebody,
you'd have to awake them.

Loose Chose

 To some it can be difficult to keep track of when to use  "lose"
and when "loose", when to use "chose" and when "choose".
 Well..."loose" is either an adjective ("loose women",  "the  cow
was loose on the road",  "to have loose bowels") or an  idiomatic
expression (like "all hell's breaking loose", "let it loose (from
sth)").  Do  note that "loose" is never a verb,  so "I  loose  my
keys" is kindof impossible.
 With "choose" it's different.  "Choose",  for starters,  is  the
present tense form of the verb "to choose",  to be used with  the
1st and 3rd forms of the present tense.  The past tense and  past
participle  have  the  form "chose"  and  "chosen"  respectively.
"Choose" has an "oo" like in "school", "chose" has an "o" like in
"rose".

Flesh and Mutton

 After  1066,  a lot of French influences penetrated the  English
language.  Hundreds  of  English words are actually in  some  way
derived from French (i.e.  Latin).  Especially a lot of  culinary
terms came from the French.
 Whereas  the  Dutch  just  about call  anything  off  an  animal
"flesh",  the  English have a wide variety of words  for  various
kinds  of  "flesh".  For starters they never called  it  "flesh",
actually,  but use "meat".  And then there are separate kinds  of
"meat",  like  "veal" (flesh from a calf used  as  meat),  "pork"
(from a pig) and "mutton" (from a sheep).

Versus

INQUIRY & ENQUIRY

 These nouns are both the same.  It should only be noted that the
Americans say "inkweri" rather than "inkwaieri".

INNOCENT & INNOCUOUS

 Innocent means "not guilty" or "harmless",  innocuous just means
"harmless".  Innocuous (the "c" is pronounced as a "k") is to  be
used  with sentences like "this is an innocuous  drug",  innocent
more like "he is innocent; he did not commit that crime".

MANDATIVE & MANDATORY

 Mandatory means "required by law;  compulsory" (as in the Slayer
song "Mandatory Suicide").  The word "mandative",  although I  am
certain I encountered it somewhere, does not exist.

DESPERATE & DISPARATE

 These  adjectives means "feeling or showing great  despair"  and
"so  different  in kind or degree that they cannot  be  compared"
respectively.   Metallica   are   disparate,   Guns'n'Roses   are
desperate.

DISCOMFITED & UNCOMFORTABLE

 The  first  means "to confuse or  embarrass",  the  latter  that
you're  not  feeling  comfortable.   You  see  there's  a  subtle
difference.  You would not be discomfited by a chair,  though you
could feel quite uncomfortable in it.

PROFANITY & PROFUNDITY

 These mean "profane (i.e. rude) behaviour, especially the use of
profane language" and "depth (esp of knowledge,  thought,  etc)".
"Maggie"  disk  magazine  used to be  full  of  profanities,  now
they're rather more filled with profundities.

BESIDE & BESIDES

 "Beside" means "at the side of; next to", "compared with" or (in
"beside  oneself")  "having lost someone control because  of  the
intensity  of the emotions one is feeling".  "Besides" means  "in
addition to" or "except (sb/sth); apart from".

EVOKE & INVOKE

 The  first means "bring to mind (a feeling,  memory,  etc)"  or,
formally,  "produce or cause (a response,  reaction,  etc)".  The
latter  means "use as a reason for one's action" or  "summon/call
upon".  So  if you invoke the muses that may evoke a  feeling  of
inspiration.

AFFIRMATIVE & CONFIRMATIVE

 Despite their looks,  these words are not antonyms  (opposites).
Rather,  they  both  mean the same,  i.e.  "having said  yes"  or
something like that.

UNCOVER & DISCOVER

 These  words  used to overlap in meaning  in  17th-19th  century
literature. "Discover" would be indicating the act of uncovering,
also   physically.   Later,   "discover"  became   reserved   for
discoveries, great things that are found out, that sort of thing.

PECULIAR & PARTICULAR

 These  words also used to overlap in earlier  literatury,  where
"peculiar" meant the same as "particular".  "Peculiar" these days
has connotations with "strange, odd".

Not

 Noisome  does  not  mean "full  of  noise",  rather  "offensive;
disgusting; stinking".
 Adulterate does not mean "to commit adultery on sth/sb",  rather
"make  (sth)  poorer  in quality  by  adding  another  substance;
dilute".
 Something made with high arts is not artificial, rather artful.
 Something  that  is  not  credible  is  not  incredible,  rather
incredulous.

Hyphens

 The  following  few examples should make it clear  when  hyphens
have  to  be  used:  court-martial  (compound  word),  son-in-law
(compound  word),  South America,  all-but-dead (compound  word),
much-talked-about  (compound  word),   attorney   general,   pre-
Raphaelite  (prefix and proper name compound),  pre-and  post-war
Europe,  the Bush-Gorbachev summit (two proper named compounded),
seventy-three  (compound numbers) and re-elect (prefix ends  with
the same letter that the word starts with).

Capitals

 The days of the week,  the names of the months, and proper nouns
(names of countries, people, etc.) are to be written with initial
capitals.

DerogaTalk

 If you really want to let people see how much you look down upon
the world of other computer systems or music,  etc., you might do
wise to learn by heart the following handy pseudonyms:

 clones        - clowns
 compatibles   - contemptibles
 amiga         - amoeba
 grunge rock   - crunge ruck
 MTV           - eMpTyV
 windows       - windoze

Palindromes

 On  an Internet metal mailing list I recently came  across  some
palindromes I would really like to share with you:

 SATAN, OSCILLATE MY METALLIC SONATAS

 SEX AT NOON TAXES

The Answers to the previous issue's "singular quiz"

 The  answers  to the previous issue's 'singular  quiz'  are  the
following: Axes, oxen, sons-in law, potatoes, piccolos, attorneys
general,   lieutenant  colonels,  opera,  indices,  teaspoonfuls,
messrs.,  men-of-war,  menservants,  oboes, cherubim or cherubin,
crises,   data,   cannon,  addenda,  agenda  (though  agendas  is
acceptable too),  phenomena, mesdames, pelves, paymasters general
and brigadier generals.

 This is the last line you'll ever read of this column. 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.