Skip to main content
© Antoine

 "Any landing you can walk away from is a good one."

              SOFTWARE REVIEW: KOBOLD 2.5 BY KAKTUS
                      by Richard Karsmakers

 A few years ago some really fast file copy programs appeared  on
the  market.  I  seem to recall the first one being  First  Gbr's
"Fast File Mover",  with programs such as "Kobold" and  "Cheetah"
being  released  at some later time.  These programs all  had  in
common  that  they used highly optimized program code to  do  the
copy/move operations with highly increased speed.  Speed increase
factors  of up to 10 not at all unusual.  All this  was  possible
because A) The programmers were certainly more capable than those
at Atari,  B) They used a far quicker programming language and C)
They didn't use the Operating System a lot (if at all).

 Recently,  Kaktus Gbr (a German company) released a  significant
update to their existing "Kobold" file copier.  The fact that the
additions  are  of such major scope has warranted  this  separate
review  instead of the usual short mention in a column the  likes
of "ST Software News".

Overview

 "Kobold"  is a compact utility that presents you with a  source-
and  a  target-file  selector  that  allow  for  quick  and  easy
determination  of  files/paths to be copied and into  which  path
they  need  to be copied.  Files are copied into  the  incredibly
effective  "Kobold"  data buffer in RAM,  after  which  they  are
written  to the target destination.  Instead of  using  Operating
System  calls that read the FAT,  check where the file should  be
put,  then  write the file and update the FAT in the end of  each
file copy,  "Kobold" has the FAT already in memory and writes the
whole  thing back in one fell swoop at the end.  Speed  increases
are significant, often even plain staggering.
 Apart  from copying and/or moving files,  it also  features  the
usual  scala of file management functions  (delete,  rename,  new
folder, format, soft format, etc.).

 Wait a second. I will test something...

 (Time passes. It didn't even tip its hat as it went by)

The Test

 Yep. Wow. I am even more impressed. I just copied a large folder
containing 37 further folders and a total of 118 files  amounting
to 1.6 Mb from one hard disk partition to another.  With the  GEM
desktop it took 50 seconds to copy them, and 20 seconds to delete
them  again.  With  "Kobold" it only took 6 (!) seconds  to  copy
them,  and a mere fragment of 1 second to delete them all. That's
almost 10 times faster than GEM,  and probably the speed increase
could have been bigger if I didn't have TOS 4.04 and a very  fast
hard disk with 2 Kb clusters.
 To check whether copying to floppy disk would also be  improved,
I copied a folder with 466 Kb worth of stuff (6 further  folders,
9  files,  not much at all) to a Double Density (720  Kb)  floppy
disk, which took 128 seconds with GEM (and 20 seconds to delete).
With   "Kobold"  the  speed  increase  was  less   dramatic   but
significant  nonetheless  - 91 seconds to copy and 5  seconds  to
delete.
 Last,  but  certainly  not  least,  I gave  "Kobold"  a  heavier
assignment.  I ordered it to copy all the files on one  partition
(some 14,5 Mb of 198 folders containing 1192 files) to the  spare
space  present on another.  With verify on (for  "Kobold"),  this
took a mere 53 seconds,  and it took a bit less than 2 seconds to
delete them all again.  With verify off, by the way, it's just as
fast.
 All  copy  operations  performed here were done with  a  1.7  Mb
RAM buffer size. More RAM will probably increase speed even more.

The Programming Language

 The  thing that makes "Kobold" stand out even among  other  very
fast file copiers - including the older versions of "Kobold" - is
the  programming language it understands.  You can simply drag  a
text file on it (or specify it on the command line when  "Kobold"
is used as .TTP or .GTP) and it will process that text file as if
it was a batch file ("Kobold" calls these "jobs").
 And  the  possibilities of its programming language  are  really
interesting.

 Let's have a look at a job file I have created myself.  I use it
when  I  want to erase the disk with which I  perform  electronic
mail  at University and put the default configuration  files  and
regularly requested text files on it.
 The file was created by simply "recording" everything I did  one
time,  then define a few operation parameters and write the  file
to disk. I should wish to make clear that there is no actual need
to  actually  enter  an editor and do the  job  file  programming
yourself. At least not for this one.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

* Prepare Email Disk

DIALOG_LEVEL = 0
GEMDOS_MODE = (abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz)
VERIFY = ON
DATE = KEEP
ARCHIVE_TREATMENT = KEEP
SOURCE_TREATMENT = 0
BUFFER = 70

SOFT_FORMAT A
SRC_SELECT F:
SRC_SELECT EMAIL\
SRC_SELECT + BACKUP
SRC_SELECT BACKUP\
DST_SELECT A:
COPY OPEN_FOLDERS
QUIT

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 The  first  batch of commands defines specific  parameters  that
"Kobold" needs.  The "dialog level" is set to 0, i.e. "no dialogs
ever",  GEMDOS mode is activated on all partitions, verify is on,
the file date is the same on the target as it was on the  source,
the archive bit it kept, etc.
 The  second  batch of commands are the ones that  were  actually
recorded by me.  First it soft-formats drive A.  The disk remains
MS-DOS  compatible,  and it is much quicker as a  regular  format
because  only  FAT and directory are erased (something  at  which
"Kobold"  is  particularly  fast).  Next it  selects  the  source
partition,  "F:",  enters the folder "\EMAIL\",  then enters  the
folder  "\BACKUP\" within "\EMAIL\",  and then selects all  files
within "\BACKUP\" (i.e. "F:\EMAIL\BACKUP\*.*"). Do note that it's
not necessary to specify individial files here. If that folder on
my hard disk contains some extra files these will also be copied,
including all other folders contained in it (and their files,  if
any).  Last  but not least,  destination is set to "A:"  and  the
program is instructed to actually copy. Once finished, it quits.

 The  above example is really limited.  The programming  language
further  supports user interaction,  labels (including  GOTO  and
GOSUB!),   alert  boxes,   file  buffer  operations,  conditional
branches,  disk I/O commands (such as delete, new folder, format,
soft  format,  and of course move and copy),  variables and  even
BING (makes a sound).
 On the distribution disk you will find sample programs that  can
optimize a partition, a "DUP killer" (deletes all *.BAK and *.DUP
files  on  all partitions) and a backup  program.  These  program
sources can help you,  together with the manual, with the writing
of more specific applications that would not be possible with the
"Kobold" "record" mode (such as GOTO and GOSUB constructions).

Added Bits

 On  the "Kobold" distribution disk you get several  other  handy
utilities, such as one that checks a disk's integrity and another
one that can do a tree compare.  There's also a rather remarkable
job  timer,  a program that can launch specific "Kobold" jobs  at
certain times and intervals.

Concluding

 "Kobold"  is powerful,  very fast,  and can be trusted  utterly.
With  the added programming language,  it can become an  integral
part  of  all your file operations,  be they simple  or  horribly
complex ones. It works on any Atari, including Falcon.
 It sets you back quite a bit - it retails at 139 Dutch  guilders
-  but for that you get a program as vital to your well-being  as
offerings  the  likes of "Warp 9" and "XBoot".  If you  have  the
money,  you will certainly not be disappointed with it.  It comes
with plenty of extra tools,  and will make your life just so much
better.

 In the Netherlands, "Kobold" is distributed by:

 ACN
 Postbus 5011
 NL-2000 CA  Haarlem
 Netherlands

 In Germany you could contact:

 KAKTUS Richstein & Dick GbR
 Konrad-Adenauer-Str. 19
 D-67663 Kaiserslautern
 Germany

 Thanks to Willem Hartog for sending me a copy! 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.