Skip to main content

 "If God exists his name must be Murphy."
                                             Anon (in the gutter)


                           CD REVIEWS
                      by Richard Karsmakers

 Yes,  ST NEWS is multi-media now so this is the first occurrence
of  an article featuring a collection of reviews of CD and  other
music carriers.  Some of them are a bit older,  I have to  admit,
but some of them aren't.  This is the biggest of the new columns,
containing reviews of CD's recently purchased or sent to me  that
aren't too old yet. At least not really.

BANISHED - DELIVER ME UNTO PAIN

 Peaceville  is a very active company.  They're doing  what  they
call  "progressive  avant  garde  metal"  (My  Dying  Bride   and
Anathema),   funkier   music  (Kong  and  Tekton  Motor   Corp.),
experimental noise (G.G.F.H.  and Ministry of Noise),  archetypal
hard  rock (Pentagram) and psychedelic sixties on acid  of  sorts
(Ship  of  Fools).  But  let's  not  forget  bands  like  At  The
Gates,  Darkthrone and the rather image-driven chaps of Autopsy -
straight-in-the-face death metal.  This latter genre recently got
added a new American band. They are called Banished.
 And Banished,  it has to be said,  might not be highly  original
but is actually rather nice indeed.  There's the usual  heartfelt
grunt,  more  changes of tempo that you can hurl a drumstick  at,
and  effectively  simple riffs.  I think their drummer  is  quite
capable,  and  "Deliver  me  Unto Pain" - I can  tell  this  from
experience  -  is  great to have in the  background  when  you're
studying  for  an  Old Irish  exam.  Banished  has  something  of
Entombed, a tad Obituary, and a Death aftertaste. What more would
you want (except for the "Deaf Metal Sampler", that is)?

CARCASS - THE HEARTWORK EP

 I  read  somewhere  that  Carcass  new  album,  "Heartwork",  is
actually pretty brilliant.  I wouldn't know, for I haven't got it
yet  nor have I bothered to go to the local CD shop  and  listen.
However,  I  did get around to buying "The Heartwork  EP",  a  CD
single   featuring  one  of  the  "Heartwork"  tracks  plus   two
unreleased  songs.  I  always tend to be a bit  quicker  with  CD
singles  and  bootlegs,  as  these are usually  available  for  a
limited  time only.  I can always get "Heartwork" when the  price
has  gone  down.  It  might take a while -  I  haven't  even  got
"Necrotism  -  Descanting the Insalubrious" yet  (their  previous
album).
 Anyway, what of this EP?
 It is clear that Carcass have evolved.  Hardcore die-hards  will
probably  consider it selling out,  but I actually think  they've
improved a good lot. If I ever get "Heartwork" I am bound to play
it  more  often  than "Symphonies  of  Sickness".  Production  is
genuinely heavy. It sounds altogether quite OK.

CRYPT OF KERBEROS - WORLD OF MYTHS

 When attending a Metal Market early this year,  I came across  a
booth  manned  by a few Frenchies.  They turned out  to  be  from
Adipocere Records, a small indenpendent label specialising in all
kinds of underground-ish metal. I also met a friend, who took out
the  "World  of  Myths"  CD and told me this  was  some  new  and
progressive death metal that was worth checking out.
 About once or twice per year I can't restrain myself and get out
to buy a CD I have never heard of.  This was the case with  Crypt
of Cerberos.  I knew this bloke.  He was into Pan-Thy-Monium  way
before I was.  His taste was excellent.  I decided to risk it. It
was actually quite cheap too.
 Crypt  of  Kerberos  is a six  member  outfit  from  (surprise!)
Sweden.  The  thing that strikes you first is that they  actually
have  at least one pretty brilliant guitar player,  evident  from
the  first  few seconds on.  The music itself is  standard  death
metal  with  many speed  changes,  pseudo-technical  drum  rhythm
changes and that kind of thing.  I personally don't like the  way
the keyboards are used - if you look at bands like Pan-Thy-Monium
and Phlebotomized the keys on "World of Myths" are meaningless by
comparison.
 Having  said that,  I still think the album is better  than  the
average  death  metal  band.   They're  technically  gifted   and
compositions are quite good,  but they lack something that a band
like Pan-Thy-Monium has in abundance.

DEEP PURPLE - LIVE IN JAPAN

 In  1972  Deep  Purple released the legendary  "Made  in  Japan"
double  LP (single CD),  probably the best live rock  album  made
ever,  which  effortlessly left behind it  semi-legendary  trials
such as Iron Maiden's "Live after Death",  Kiss'  "Alive!",  Thin
Lizzy's "Live and Dangerous" and Yngwie J.  Malmsteen's "Trial by
Fire: Live in Leningrad" (ahem). We were quite lucky to get it in
the first place,  actually, for if it hadn't been for Deep Purple
bass player Roger Glover's enthusiasm upon hearing the  recording
quality it would have been released in Japan only under the  name
"Live in Japan".
 Roger was pretty enthusiastic altogether. It got released world-
wide  at budget price,  and it was a killer.  "Made in Japan"  is
definitely  the album no Deep Purple fan should ever be  without,
with "In the Absence of Pink:  Live Knebworth" and  "Machinehead"
breathing down its neck at a fair distance.
 Simon  Robinson,   director  of  the  Deep  Purple  Appreciation
Society, writer of all those interesting CD sleeve notes on "Live
in London", "In Concert" and "Skandinavian Nights" and instigator
of  Connoisseur Collection CD's such as "Ritchie  Blackmore  Rock
Profile I & II",  "Gemine Suite" and the most excellent  "Rainbow
Live  in Germany 1976",  has apparently succeeded in letting  EMI
release "Live in Japan".  In this case,  however, "Live in Japan"
features  the three almost complete concerts taped in Japan  from
which "Made in Japan" was made.
 For sixty Dutch guilders you get a three-double CD with over 200
minutes' worth of music. Sound quality is the same, even though I
think  "Made  in Japan" had a somewhat better  bass  mix.  Twenty
minutes  of "Space Truckin'" pass by three times - what  more  do
you want?!
 It's  an  incredible CD,  and relatively  cheap  too,  featuring
encores such as "Black Night" and "Speed King" as well.  To  make
the  whole  thing  even  better  they've  thrown  in  a  lavishly
illustrated booklet written by Deep Purple expert extraordinaire,
Simon Robinson himself.
 A  shame  it  doesn't have the "Black Night"  version  from  "24
Carat Purple" and "Singles A's & B's".  I'd have preferred  that,
as  well  as the omitted "Lucille",  instead of rehashes  of  the
tracks  that can be found on the original "Made in  Japan"  (most
particularly that version of "Space Truckin'"). All in all it's a
great  release,  but  not  perfect.  Worth  getting  nonetheless,
certainly at its price.

DRUG FREE AMERICA - TRIP: THE DREAMTIME REMIXES

 Peaceville  don't limit themselves to death metal and that  kind
of thing. As a matter of fact some of the stuff they do is pretty
close  to  the  stuff I hate (i.e.  house) and  a  few  of  their
offerings I wouldn't ever think of playing twice.
 Drug Free America is an interesting band that comes pretty close
to the stuff I don't like.  Not too close, luckily. Before I tell
you  something  about the music on their  debut  CD,  "Trip:  The
Dreamtime  Remixes",  I  would first like to tell you  the  story
behind the band.
 Drug  Free  America  consists of two people who met  in  a  drug
rehabilitation  clinic.  They  were  given  experimental  therapy
which,  thus  goes  the legend,  awarded them with the  power  of
telepathy  and  the  talent of distilling  sounds  patterns  from
extraterrestrial  factors (including aliens).  Perhaps this is  a
rather desperate attempt at a unique image,  but when you  listen
to the CD you quickly realise that it might very well be true.
 Some  of the things tread the razor's edge of  house.  They  all
have  a pretty firm rhythm,  but lack the brainless quality  that
makes  house  so  loathsome  to  me.   It  seems  this  band   is
experimenting a lot with sounds and rhythms,  not just talking to
a beat (as a matter of fact there are no vocals at all).
 I found the CD unexpectedly worthy of my attention.

GODSEND - AS THE SHADOWS FALL

 Godsend,  a solo project of the Norwegian Gunder Audun  Dragsten
with  the  aid of Dan Swano (vocals) and Benny "Edge  of  Sanity"
Larsson  (drums) as session musicians,  is probably  the  saddest
band I've ever heard.  Not because they're bad but because  their
music  radiated sadness into the existing  multiverse.  The  nine
tracks  that  pass  the listener by -  produced  as  crisply  and
brilliantly   as  Metallica's  "Metallica  -  vary  from   slower
masterpieces  of  tearjerking  doom  to  somewhat  more  up-tempo
material. The thing that makes all of what you hear so profoundly
affecting are the vocals. No grunt here, but a deep and sonorous,
booming  voice  that  works itself into  your  brain  and  really
doesn't want to get out at all.
 I  think Godsend can adequately be described if I tell you  they
have  the  song themes of Anathema  (lost  love,  sadness,  rain,
leaves falling in autumn),  the drums of Metallica (only  slower)
and the vocals that so far I only heard on some of the tracks  of
Isengard  (see review below),  whereas sometimes  they  transform
even into something that made me think of Pink Floyd.  One  song,
"Walking  the  Roads  of the Unbeheld" is the  weirdest  of  all,
sounding  a  bit  like R.E.M.  intermingled  with  Pearl  Jam  or
something. But it's short.
 Godsend  may  perhaps not be godsent,  but are  surely  a  fresh
breath of death,  doom and pity through the wafts of most of  the
genre.

ISENGARD - VINTERSKUGGE

 Isengard  is a solo project of Fenriz,  drummer of  the  "unholy
black  metal band" Darkthrone.  They are from Norway!  I got  the
promo  CD sent to me,  so the finished product might not  contain
half  of the stuff found on that - like "Chapter Two  -  Isengard
Demo 1989 August,  Spectres over Gorgoroth",  for example,  which
has  bad sound quality that could even put most modern  demos  to
shame.  Then  again,  the finished product might have them  after
all.
 Isengard,  like Darkthrone,  tries to break through the barriers
of  (death) metal.  Not with volume or anything,  but with  sheer
bizarreness of their songs. "Vinterskugge" (which I believe means
something like "Winter's Disappointment" in Norwegian) starts off
rather excellently with the title track. The singing is unusual -
no grunt but even a bit operaic - but not bad at all.  The second
song,  "Gjennom Skogen Til Blaafjellene", is an instrumental that
is quite good,  too,  but after that they start to rip. The music
gets a lot faster at times,  and vocals transform themselves into
something not unlike those of G.G.F.H.'s Ghost.
 Production could have been better,  I feel,  for it sounds quite
meagre  indeed.  "Vinterskugge" is an album that you  can  really
crank  up  the volume of without feeling the bass  drum  in  your
bowels,  unlike "Metallica" for example.  Musically the album  is
quite innovative and very enjoyable, but the vocals are sometimes
a bit too distorted for their own good.  It's a mixture of  Black
Sabbath and something new, with a touch of G.G.F.H. at times.

METALLICA - LIVE SHIT: BINGE & PURGE

 Well,  Metallica finally released their first official live  CD.
As  a  matter of fact they've also thrown in two live  videos  on
three  tapes.  Well,  what do you get for the  approximately  250
Dutch  guilders you have to part with in order to get it  in  the
first place?
 It's  a sortof large cardboard flightcase-design box  containing
three video tapes,  a triple-CD, a 72-page full-colour booklet, a
San  Diego  Snake Pit pass (a trifle useless) and a  'Scary  Guy'
(skull)  stencil.   The  CDs  feature  a  full  concert  off  the
"Wherever"  tour,  in  total amounting to almost 180  minutes  of
footage  taped at five gigs at the Sports  Palace,  Mexico  City,
Mexico (February 25/26/27 and March 1/2 1993). Set list: Disc 1 -
"Enter  Sandman",   "Creeping  Death",   "Harvester  of  Sorrow",
"Welcome Home (Sanitarium"),  "Sad but True",  "Of Wolf and Man",
"The Unforgiven",  "Justice Medley",  "Bass & Guitar solo" (quite
different from other sets,  and no drumsolo!),  disc 2 - "Through
the Never",  "For Whom the Bell Tolls",  "Fade to Black", "Master
of Puppets",  "Seek and Destroy",  "Whiplash",  disc 3 - "Nothing
Else  Matters",  "Wherever  I May  Roam",  "Am  I  Evil?",  "Last
Caress", "One", "Battery", "The Four Horsemen", "Motorbreath" and
"Stone  Cold  Crazy".  The first two videos  feature  a  complete
concert (190 minutes) from the Sports Arena,  San Diego,  January
13/14  1992.  Set  list:  Video 1 -  "Enter  Sandman",  "Creeping
Death",  "Harvester of Sorrow", "Welcome Home (Sanitarium)", "Sad
But  True",  "Wherever I May Roam",  "Through  the  Never",  "The
Unforgiven",  "Justice Medley", "bass and guitar solo", video 2 -
"The Four Horsemen",  "For Whom the Bell Tolls", "Fade to Black",
"Whiplash",  "Master of Puppets",  "Seek & Destroy", "One", "Last
Caress",  "Am  I Evil?",  "Battery" and "Stone Cold  Crazy".  The
third  video  contains  a gig off  the  "Justice"  tour,  Seattle
Coliseum,  Seattle,  on August 29/30 1989.  It is a complete (130
minute)  concert  with "Blackened",  "For Whom the  Bell  Tolls",
"Welcome  Home (Sanitarium)",  "Harvester of Sorrow",  "The  Four
Horsemen",  "The Thing That Should Not Be",  "Master of Puppets",
"Fade  to Black",  "Seek & Destroy",  "...And Justice  for  All",
"One", "Creeping Death", "Guitar Solo", "Battery", "Last Caress",
"Am I Evil?", "Whiplash" and "Breadfan". Vertigo order number 518
725-0.
 The  quality  is excellent.  The CDs sound almost as  if  you're
right  smack  in the centre of a Snakepit,  and  the  videos  are
capably directed.  The whole package makes memories come back  in
large numbers - if you've been to either or both of the  "Damaged
Justice"  and "Wherever I May Roam" tours.  There is not much  to
say,  really. It's just a somewhat heftily priced but nonetheless
excellent package that no true Metallica afficionado should claim
to be without.  It's worth the price,  even if you have to  spend
the following couple of months really cutting down on  everything
including the bare essentials such as food, clothes and soap.

MORTA SKULD - AS HUMANITY FADES

 We  should feel lucky that this album got released at  all,  for
the  American  band Morta Skuld have split a while ago  and  have
only  recently  come back together to release a  new  album,  "As
Humanity Fades".  The original line-up of Dave Gregor (vocals and
guitar),  Jason Hellman (bass),  Jason O'Conell (guitar) and  Ken
Truckenbrod  (drums)  has laid down 12 tracks (2 less  on  vinyl)
which are firmly set in the death metal vein but with an  unusual
ingredient somewhere lurking in the depths of their compositions.
I  can't quite put my finger on it;  perhaps it's the  amount  of
riffs  they've thrown in,  or perhaps it's the bass  that  sounds
different from other bass sounds (to say the least).
 "As  Humanity Fades" contains great death metal that I  am  sure
most lovers of the genre will get to grips with most firmly. It's
got  the necessary aggression,  the "hey we look like a bunch  of
really  strong and macho dudes" pictures on the CD liner,  and  a
magic ingredientnot to be specified in more detail.

MY DYING BRIDE - TURN LOOSE THE SWANS

 When  I first bought the CD I had my doubts.  I think there  are
two  causes  for this doubt:  First,  it starts with  the  rather
unusual  and atypical "Sear Me MCMXCIII" (a rehashed  version  of
"Sear Me" played only on violin and piano),  and second it  lacks
the instant appeal of their previous CD, "As The Flower Withers".
Some  months  have  come and gone,  and the CD  has  been  played
multiple more times. All my doubts have gone. The album has grown
on me in equal only to Pan-Thy-Monium's albums, mentioned below.
 There's plenty more violin on "Turn Loose the  Swans",  probably
because violinist Martin is now a full-time member of the band. A
good  development,  I think.  Also,  vocalist Aaron abandons  his
deathly  deep  grunt  now and  again,  creating  an  even  better
contrast of sounds on the new album.  "Turn Loose the Swans"  has
some true gems of doom, like "The Snow in my Hand" and "The Crown
of  Sympathy".  As  a  whole,  however,  with  the  exception  of
aforementioned  instrumental that kicks it off,  "Turn Loose  the
Swans" is an album thoroughly worthy of purchase.  My Dying Bride
are still the leading exponents of what Peaceville labels  "avant
garde metal". An excellent offering.

MY DYING BRIDE - I AM THE BLOODY EARTH

 My Dying Bride release quite a lot of EPs.  This is probably the
least interesting of them,  as it actually only contains one  new
track, "I Am the Bloody Earth". The other two tracks contained on
it are "Transcending (Into the Exquisite)" and "Crown of Sympathy
(Remix)".  The  first  is a 134 bpm mix made up of old  My  Dying
Bride  song  elements  by Steve Dixon,  main  man  of  Drug  Free
America.  It's not actually bad and still quite heavy,  but  it's
not  the  way My Dying Bride is.  The latter is a  remix  of  the
existing  song,  basically with intro and outro changed  and  the
drums sounding different (not necessarily better).
 The title track is a good one,  though,  and is the only  reason
why  you  would want to buy this CD single unless  you're  really
into the band such as me.

NIGHTFALL - MACABRE SUNSETS

 When I heard the Nightfall track on the Peaceville "Deaf  Metal"
sampler I knew I just had to have the real thing.  It was one  of
the  very best tracks on said sampler,  and it combined My  Dying
Bride  with perhaps rather more innovative guitar work and a  lot
of  aggression  instead of sadness.  "War Metal" is  what  it  is
called,  this music created by the Greek band that was voted last
year's "Band of the Year" by Greek "Metal Hammer"  magazine.  And
quite justly,  it may be said.  Their debut CD was already  quite
good,  but  "Macabre  Sunsets"  takes  everything  just  so  much
further.
 I have to say it takes a bit of getting used to.  First I didn't
like the other tracks at all.  Only the track I  knew,  "Enormous
(The  anthem  of Death)",  held any beauty for  me.  But  when  I
listened  a few more times the CD grew on me.  And now I am in  a
state  of  bliss  and horror.  Bliss because I  really  like  the
sounds,  the  unusual  compositions,  and  Efthimis  K.'s  grind-
through-the-marrow-of-your-coffin   voice.   Horror  because   my
girlfriend hates it probably more than she before hated  Obituary
and  Entombed (and she hated that pretty much).  So whenever  she
pops  out  for a while I insert the CD in the player and  let  it
rip.
 I have tried to analyse what I like about Nightfall,  apart from
the  fact that the more you listen to it the better  it  gets.  I
have reason to believe it may be the unusual guitar  parts,  that
are played like sortof an extra voice,  a wail almost,  on top of
major  parts  of the melodies.  Really  eerie.  Really  haunting.
Really great.
 Because I already bought the CD before I got the promo,  you can
win  the  promo if you send in a postcard to  the  correspondence
address  before  October  1st 1994 with on it the  reply  to  the
following  question:  What  is the title of the  Nightfall  debut
album?  Don't expect the answer in this issue of ST NEWS,  by the
way.

PAN-THY-MONIUM - DAWN OF DREAMS

 This is most certainly by the distance the most brilliant  album
I've  bought in the recent five months or so.  From the  starting
notes  of the 20+ minute epos to the end of the last song it's  a
relentless,  almost orgiastic attack of exceptional  experiMETAL.
The use of saxophone and utterly excellent use of keyboards  make
this album stand out among all similar efforts in the death metal
genre.  No  band is heavier,  few grunts are deeper  (except  for
Phlebotomized),  and all of it does not degenerate into a load of
sonic mess that your ears can barely make sense of.
 Words fail to explain the feelings that speeds through my entire
body when I listen to this album. The riffs are simply brilliant,
keyboard  fills  haunting,   instruments  down-tuned,  sax  parts
unconventional,  production superb, and the whole thing is just a
total and complete joy to listen to.  These guys seem exceedingly
inspired, pushing away the boundaries of the genre and creating a
totally  unique and supreme sound.  If you like death  metal  but
you're  a tad bored with what most of the bands in the genre  are
doing, Pan-Thy-Monium is the band to check out.

PAN-THY-MONIUM - KHAOOHS

 "Khaoohs" is the second album released by Pan-Thy-Monium.  After
listening to it many times I still don't think it's quite as good
as  "Dawn  of Dreams",  but by any other standard  it's  still  a
supreme CD. On the contrary to their debut, "Khaoosh" does have a
track listing.  There are a dozen tracks on the CD,  none as long
as   the  epos  present  on  "Dawn  of  Dreams"  but   impressive
nonetheless. Most of the tracks still tread the boundaries of the
usual to the unusual,  one track even featuring sampling and  the
like,  and  another  containing  ramblings in  what  is  probably
Swedish  but  sounds  more like Finnish.  If you  like  "Dawn  of
Dreams" you'll have no trouble liking this one,  even though it's
not quite the same.

PARADISE LOST - SEALS THE SENSE

 Like with "Shades of God",  the release of "Icon" eventually got
acompanied by an EP.  In this case it features two existing songs
("Embers  Fire" and "True Belief") with one new song  "Sweetness"
and a live version of "Your Hand in Mine".  As a whole I tend  to
dislike there being more than one old song on there - the "Shades
of God" EP ("As I Die") had one old song,  two new songs and  one
live  performance.  "Seals the Sens" is only of interest to  true
fans.  "Sweetness"  is  a  quite  average  song,  not  very  well
produced,  and  "Your  Hand  in Mine"  (recorded  in  Germany  in
September last year) lacks a real live feeling.
 I have mixed feelings about this.

PHLEBOTOMIZED - PREACH ETERNAL GOSPELS

 At  the  annual "Festacle" organised by the  three  major  Dutch
Heavy Metal Student Societies, I met this bloke who turned out to
be  one  of the guitarists of a Dutch band  named  Phlebotomized.
When  I told him of ST NEWS he was more than willing to  give  me
their current mini CD, "Preach Eternal Gospels".
 Let  me start right off with the proclamation that it's  a  more
than excellent CD.  It's severely heavy,  with slow segments  not
unlike My Dying Bride and faster pieces like some of the best  of
Pan-Thy-Monium,  with added keyboards providing a haunting sound.
People who say death metal is dead really don't know what they're
talking  about.  Bands  like Phlebotomized are a  fresh  waft  of
killer wind through the death metal lands.  Even so, I think this
mini CD could have been better if,  for example,  the mix had had
more violin prominence.  Most of the time this instrument is  too
far in the background,  and there is only one instant where  part
of   a   song  has  an  uncanny  resemblance  to   Skyclad   with
appropriately audible violin parts.
 If  you're  interested  in  getting  more  info,  write  to  the
following address (add Dutch stamps or IRCs please).

 Phlebotomized
 c/o Jordy Middelbosch
 Symfonielaan 16
 NL-3208 SE  Spijkenisse
 The Netherlands

 The CD is marketed by Malodorous Mangled Innards Records:

 M.M.I. Records
 c/o Markus Woeste
 Heerstr. 77
 D-58553 Halver
 Germany

SATRIANI, JOE - SEE THAT WIZZARD PLAY GUITAR (sic)

 I always try to get a bootleg recording of each tour that I have
actually  witnessed  a concert of.  Some months ago  I  bought  a
bootleg  CD of a Joe Satriani performance in England  early  last
year,  but the other day I came across an even better offering in
the  shape of this "See that Wizzard Play Guitar" double CD  that
the credits even claim was recorded at Vredenburg, Utrecht, where
I saw the Master play in person.
 The  venue  date  listed on the  CD,  however,  is  most  likely
incorrect.  It lists the date as February 2nd 1993 at Vredenburg,
Utrecht,  at which date Satriani was probaby playing in  Scotland
somewhere.  So either the date is faulty or the concert was taped
in Scotland.
 Anyway, the quality is near-commercial and this time it's a full
concert,  from "Satch Boogie" to the encore "Rubina".  The second
CD  is filled up with five tracks that could already be found  on
the "Guitar Killer" bootleg (and probably one or two others), but
I guess that's OK. The two CDs amount to over 140 minutes of good
quality music.
 Much  in  the way "San Jose '88" (complete concert)  and  "Paris
1990"  (complete concert minus one encore and the bass-and  drum-
solos) were the best quality reasonably complete versions of  the
two  previous  tours,  "See  that Wizzard  Play  Guitar"  is  the
definite  "Extremist" tour bootleg.  If you're looking  to  catch
again  the  atmosphere  of a recent  Satriani  concert,  look  no
further.  Certainly  don't  bother getting  "The  Extremist  Tour
1993" (single CD, recorded in England), which is neither complete
nor of such good quality.

SODOM - GET WHAT YOU DESERVE

 Sodom  have  probably released their meanest  CD  so  far,  with
utterly straight-between-the-eyes heavy drumming of an aggression
I  can't recall ever having heard with this band.  This might  be
caused by the fact that Chris Witchhunter (who played drums  from
the very beginning up to the previous album,  "Tapping the Vein")
has  been  replaced by one Atomic Steif who seems to get  off  on
very  fast  and very loud drumming.  Ever since  guitarist  Frank
Blackfire left to join Kreator (after "Agent Orange"),  Sodom has
lacked  the  melodious approach so evident on  the  albums  after
"Obsessed  by  Cruelty",   and  "Get  What  you  Deserve"  is  no
exception. Drums are more aggressive but the guitars too, causing
a definite lack of melody.
 "Get  What  You Deserve" is very much like "Tapping  the  Vein",
though  its  production  is perhaps a bit  less  heavy.  Back  to
basics, it offers 16 shorter songs, a notable exception being the
instrumental   and   oddly  melodic  "Tribute  to   Moby   Dick".
Compositions  aren't extraordinary at all,  not if compared  with
their  two prime albums,  "Persecution Mania" and "Agent  Orange"
(again,  said  instrumental  being an exception).  The  at  times
almost  terrifying speed known from their first EP has  returned,
but somehow those really old songs were a lot more catchy.
 Many  of the lyrics,  especially those of the Gemans songs  "Die
Stumme  Ursel"  and "Erwachet!" are about sex.  The lyrics  as  a
whole  strike  me  as a prototype  example  of  unrhythmic,  also
lacking rhyme.  On top of that, Tom Angelripper sings that in his
ny now familiar and totally unmelodic way.
 I  like  the album,  but probably most because  not  getting  it
would  have rendered my complete Sodom collection  complete.  You
have  to  be  in the mood to listen to  it.  A  masterpiece  like
"Tribute to Moby Dick" and the rather OK cover of Venom's classic
"Angeldust" make the album worth while.  They're probably nice to
see  live - it's easy to imagine violently thrashing fans  during
some of the really fast and aggressive songs.
 The  "Sodom"  entry  in the  "Kerrang!  Heavy  Metal  Direktory"
mentions  that  the band never succeeded in breaking  beyond  the
German market. I think they won't ever, not with masterworks like
"Persecution Mania" lying years back.

UNLEASHED POWER - QUINTET OF SPHERES

 A  friend  of  mine got this CD - which I  understand  might  be
pretty  hard to lay hands on - and borrowed it to me so  I  could
have a listen too. What we have here is a fairly innovative band,
probably to be classified within the progressive rock genre. They
consist of some Danish and American members I seem to recall, and
they have a pretty excellent drummer.
 The  problem  with Unleashed Power,  which  was  something  that
friend of mine had also noticed,  is that all songs sound somehow
a bit alike. I tried to listen to what causes that to happen, and
I  think it's probably yhe singer.  First of all the  vocals  are
mixed  rather too soft,  and the vocal qualities  linger  between
Fates  Warning and Bryan Adams.  I don't like the vocalist  much.
The other band members are rather capable I think.
 I don't really know what to say about this.  If you can find  it
you  might  want  to  have a listen and  see  if  it  warrants  a
purchase.

VAI - SEX AND RELIGION

 I already spent some space on this particular CD in the previous
issue  of  ST NEWS,  but it seems that I  have  perhaps  somewhat
underestimated  the growing power that it turned out to  have  on
me.  Hence this kind of re-review,  as I think the CD deserves  a
better  review due to the unexpected True Beauty of some  of  the
songs.  I'd  like  to resort to the somewhat  unprofessional  but
otherwise handy list of songs.
 "An   Earth   Dweller's  Return"  is  a  short   and   bombastic
instrumental.  In  the record shop I only listened to this  song,
assuming it was sortof representative of the rest. It wasn't. The
only bad thing about this song is that it's too short.
 "Here  & Now" is a nice song with reasonable singing  and  great
guitar work,  especially the solo.  If it has been my decision, I
would have made this the single instead of the quite horrid "Down
Deep into the Pain".
 "In  My Dreams With You" is quite an OK song,  a bit  less  than
"Here & Now" and a bit of a clich√© ballad perhaps.  Similar  goes
for the fourth song,  "Still my Bleeding Heart", which is made up
for by the excellent guitar solo.
 "Sex  & Religion" is a positively vomit-inducing song,  to  such
extent even that I have my CD player skip it each time. It really
has too little guitar,  to many Bon Jovi singing bits,  and a lot
of  religious crap along the lines of "why can't you love god  in
your  bed" and "jesus christ is in your bed  tonight".  Terrible.
One  of  the  worst songs ever done by Steve Vai as  far  as  I'm
concerned.
 "Dirty  Black Hole" is one of the mediocre songs.  Singer  Devin
Townshend  screams  way  too much and there  isn't  quite  enough
guitar work.
 "Touching  Tongues"  is  an instrumental  with  sitar  and  most
beautiful  guitar  work,  one of my few real  favourites  on  the
album. Devin finds it necessary to scream during one instant, but
it's kept within limits.  This song could have been off  "Passion
and Warfare".
 "State of Grace" is rather good but much too short  instrumental
about which I can't really say a lot more.
 "Survive" has a beautiful chorus, but a horribly screaming intro
and perhaps it's a bit too funky for my taste.  It has some  nice
guitar moments and even some humour near the end.
 "Pig"  has  a lot of truly exquisite guitar work with  fast  and
impressive  guitar  solo bits between the  singing.  The  singing
rather too often transforms into screaming,  which is a bit of  a
shame.
 "The  Road to Mt.  Calvary" isn't actually too bad  but  doesn't
have much to do with music at all and has rather an enormous load
of screaming.  God (who does not exist), I hate this Devin dude's
singing.
 "Down  Deep Into the Pain" might be a song about the miracle  of
birth  but it's the worst track on the CD - and despite  that  it
was  elected to be the single and video.  The singing revolts  me
and  the  composition as it stands doesn't relate to me  at  all.
It's  a shame that a few good guitar moments are wasted  on  this
track.  The last few moments are no doubt literary sufficient but
have nothing to do with music.
 "Rescue  Me  or  Bury  Me" is  an  truly  beautiful  song,  from
beginning to end. There is a lot of subtle guitar work, including
some acoustic, as well as totally awesome solos. Devin even sings
properly.  This is made of the same kind of material as "For  the
Love  of God".  Really quite lovely.  And because it's  the  last
track on the CD it always leaves a good impression.
 Concluding,  it  can be said that Steve Vai is still one of  the
very,  very best guitar players to roam this earth.  Almost every
note  he  plays is brilliant from a technical  or  sheer  musical
point of view.  It is a thorough shame that he found it necessary
to  get  such an extreme singer (or a singer  at  all).  I  would
rather  have  preferred them throwing  "Here  &  Now",  "Touching
Tongues"  and  "Rescue Me or Bury Me" on a CD single  so  that  I
could have saved the difference in money.

VANGELIS - BLADE RUNNER ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK

 I  don't think I would ever have come across this particular  CD
if  I hadn't been subscribed to "Direct",  the Vangelis  Internet
mailing list run by Keith Gregoire.  News of this release already
reached me early December, and from that moment I went a-huntin'.
 "Blade Runner",  cult scifi movie and favourite of many  people,
was released in 1982.  Vangelis did most of the music score,  but
the  eventual  Original  Soundtrack never  got  released  due  to
contractual  dispute.  Only a few tracks,  most notably the  "End
Titles Theme",  were released on the 1989 Vangelis compilation CD
"Themes".  There was an Original Soundtrack, actually, but it was
an  orchestral  version of some American  orchestra  playing  the
stuff that Vangelis had originally done on synths.
 The "Blade Runner Original Soundtrack" is a limited edition "not
licensed for public sale".  Only 2,000 numbered copies have  been
made  (mine is #431).  It has been said that,  actually,  it's  a
bootleg  of sorts.  Perhaps it is - especially the  deep  booming
sounds so characteristic of some Vangelis compositions sound  ill
mastered,  a  bit distorted.  Then again,  perhaps it's not -  it
surely looks professional and well-researched including an 8-page
booklet filled with comments and supposedly rare pictures.
 What matters is that I have it.  And I like it.  Even though  it
tends to plod along without attracting a lot of attention -  like
so many soundtracks do - it's pretty brilliant. Some of the songs
are  true  Vangelis  masterpieces ("Main  Titles  and  Prologue",
"Blade  Runner Blues",  "On the Trail of Nexus 9" (if  you  don't
mind a bit of Arabian chanting),  "The Prodigal Son Brings Death"
and,  of course "End Titles").  "End Titles" is actually  several
minutes longer than the "Themes" version, too.
 All  in all the CD features almost 73 minutes worth of music  of
which   only  three  songs  (forties-style  bar  music   thingies
amounting to about 10 minutes) are not worth your while.
 The CD is made in the EEC by a label called "Off World Music". I
got mine through US import, though, through a company specialised
in soundtracks called Screen Archives.
 Although  I  highly doubt whether they still  have  some  copies
lying  around,  you can always inquire at the  address  below.  I
recall having paid US$ 32-34 for the CD,  excluding postage,  but
in  the  mean  time some companies are asked  something  like  in
excess of US$ 50.

 Screen Archives
 c/o Craig Spaulding
 P.O. Box 34792
 Washington, D.C. 20043
 United States of America
 Tel. 202/238-1434

 Some  more  or less interesting phone numbers (all in  the  USA)
that  you might try if you fail to obtain any at Screen  Archives
are:

 Footlight Records (New York City, lower Manhattan): 212/533-1572
 Intrada (San Francisco): 415/776-1333
 STAR (Harrisburg, PA.): 717/656-0121
 Disc Connection (West Los Angeles): 310/208-7211

VARIOUS ARTISTS - DEAF METAL SAMPLER

 Have I already told you I really like Peaceville? And that's not
at all because they are one of the very few companies that  deems
ST NEWS worthy of review material and press releases, but because
they  have  the  tendency to release a lot  of  sampler  CDs.  In
general these set you back about ¬£3 (or 10 Dutch  guilders),  for
which  you  get around 70 minutes  of  representative  Peaceville
music, often including the odd few exclusive tracks.
 The  latest featuring in their sampler department is  the  "Deaf
Metal  Sampler" (after their previous  Dreamtime  sampler,  "Head
Your Mind").  Again you get almost 75 minutes worth of music.  In
this  case  it's  all  death  metal  that  is  released   through
Peaceville's Deaf label. There's tracks of At The Gates, Impaler,
Vital  Remains,  Morta  Skuld  and Banished,  as well  as  a  few
exclusive tracks by Dissection, Maimed and Eucharist from Zweden,
Chorus  of Ruin from England,  Nightfall from Greece  and  Doomed
from the States. Actually, all of the tracks are quite good, with
a  few  tracks sticking out (Vital Remains,  Chorus of  Ruin  and
Nightfall)  and  a  few I like rather  less  (Pitch  Shifter  and
Prophecy of Doom). One of the tracks, "The View" by Eucharist, is
incredibly  fast and might very well have the fastest drummer  on
earth  (though  I  suspect it may very well be  a  drum  computer
judging by the speed of the drum fills).
 If  you're  into this kind of music there is  really  no  reason
(certainly  not  price-wise) why you shouldn't  get  this  album.
Except for one or two tracks it's really cool too.  I have in the
mean  time bought two of the albums of which tracks are  featured
on  this sampler,  and I have to say that the  sampler  generally
turns out to have the best track. You can't go wrong with this!

 And finally...

 Thanks  need to be given to a few people and companies who  made
some of the stuff here possible, most important of which are Andy
and  Dinger  at  Peaceville and Severine  and  Philippe  at  Holy
Records. Cheers, guys! 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.