Skip to main content
© Dave 'Spaz of TLB' Moss

 I: Eh,  hi officer,  um,  we had a flat tyre back there,  do you
think you guys can get us out?
 P: No, that's not my job, my job is not to help your fucking ass
out.
 I: I mean, ah, you know, I don't have any other way to get home.
 P: That's not my job, asshole.
 I: Well, eh, could you tell me what you job is?
 P: Right now my job is eating these donuts,  or maybe...eh, wait
a minute, aren't you...
 BLAM.
 BLAM.
 BLAM.
 I: Yeah.
                                                       Body Count


A THIRD ATTEMPT AT THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE DISK MAGAZINE ROUNDUP!
                             PART 1
                      by Richard Karsmakers

 In  ST  NEWS  Volume  7 Issue 2 the  predecessor  to  this  disk
magazine roundup appeared - the penultimate roundup.  In Volume 8
Issue  2,  over one year later,  a panultimate version  appeared.
This  time it's just the third one.  Nothing pen-or  pan-ultimate
about it,  it's just as up-to-date and extensive as possible (and
maybe post-pan-ultimate or something). And, likely, this is still
not the last you'll see of it,  what with my intention to publish
updated versions of this article about once a year.
 I  have  refrained from trying to include all  online  magazines
(like  the  hundreds of different Net Digests,  to name  but  one
common  class of examples),  and instead only included  the  ones
that  may  be  of  interest  to  general  ST  users  and  fiction
afficionados.

 Anyway, now for this newly incarnated roundup. The first version
contained "over *fortytwo*" entries, the Volume 8 Issue 2 one had
86. Again there has been a bit of growth, so that all in all this
third  occurrence lists 121 entries,  of which 40 are  references
to on-line efforts.
 Thanks need to go to Dave Mooney and John Weller of "STEN" (even
though  they  r.i.p.) for the original idea back in  '91  or  '92
somewhere,  and  a  lot  of other people  (mainly  disk  magazine
editors  and  e-zine list compiler John Labovitz)  whom  I  can't
possibly all start mentioning here. Cheers to all you guys!

=================================================================
 Status:   Mentions  whether  the  magazine  is  Public   Domain,
  shareware, commercial or whatever else is possible.
 User interface:  Does the mag have a user interface of its  own?
  if so, what's it like (very briefly)?
 Latest issue:  The latest (or last) issue of the magazine.  This
  particular  information is limited to my own knowledge  and  it
  therefore not infallible at all!  Better, perhaps, to interpret
  this as "latest known issue".
 Address:  The address (standard mail address and/or email) where
  the editorial staff may be contacted.  If the magazine is  dead
  this is considered irrelevant.
 Health:  Is the magazine still being released or has  it,  let's
  euphemize, passed away already? Interestingly, there are also a
  few in-between possibilities.
 Language:  What language is (or which languages are) used in the
  magazine?
=================================================================

=================================================================
                        AAUSAC - NASA MAG
=================================================================

AAUSAC

 A  disk  mag by the Association of Atari Users  in  Schools  And
Colleges. It is put together by a chap called Terry Freedman, and
its  aim is to bring together teachers and lecturers who use  the
Atari in their work.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes. An old version of the Newsdisk shell.
 Latest issue: Number 1.
 Address: 45 Douglas Road, Goodmayes, Essex, England.
 Health: Alive?
 Language: English.

Access Magazine

 This  magazine  gives access to a behind the scenes  glimpse  of
people  and place you've always wondered about,  while  revealing
all they can discover about the world of entertainment (and  they
claim  to be rather good at this).  They provide you with  up-to-
date  info  on  everything from the supernatural to  the  art  of
cooking. It's said to be very diverse, but no hands-on experience
here.  It's  bi-monthly,  and  its editor is  Shirley  Bragg.  It
started early 1994.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: None.
 Latest issue: Not known.
 Address: Email access@ambassador.com.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

ACUSG

 A disk magazine that came from a London Atari ST user group.  At
least  2  issues are known to have come out,  but  they  probably
ceased  existing  after  Volume 1 Issue  2.  Articles  were  tiny
(displayed in dialog boxes,  for crying out loud), and accent was
put on programs that could be run from the shell.  The last known
issue (i.e. Volume 1 Issue 2) was released in June 1987.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes. A custom one that was, let's face it, bad.
 Latest issue: Not certain; probably Volume 1 Issue 2.
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: English.

Admirables Mag

 A Finnish disk magazine with a demo'n'hacking  atmosphere.  Nice
music (some of it ripped), nice demos, nice graphics. Quite a lot
of stuff is offered,  among which also quite a load of  articles.
The  editor seems to be Claff Moron of the Admirables.  This  may
(hopefully) not be his real name (no offence intended if it is!).
 It  is very confusing in all to know that this seems also to  be
the  name  of a French magazine that was born  dead,  again  with
Claff  Moron  in  it?!?  Not even  someone  connected  with  this
magazine seemed to be able to explain this satisfactorily.  Maybe
I'm just stupid.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes. A custom one. Quite slow.
 Latest issue: Number 3.
 Address: Kotimaenkuja 4, 27230 Lappi TL, Finland.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Amateur Computerist, The

 A  sortof  regular  computer magazine,  covering  all  sorts  of
different  computer-related  subjects.  Starting  with  Volume  4
numbers 2/3,  it's become available in electronic form instead of
the  usual paper-only one.  It's an American magazine  edited  by
Ronda Hauben and is mostly devoted to Internet-related  subjects.
Not a real computer magazine in general, despite its name.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: None.
 Latest issue: Volume 5 Issue 3/4 (summer/fall 1993).
 Address: Email au329@cleveland.freenet.edu.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Amazine

 A  disk  magazine that used to be made by the  demo  coders  Mad
Vision  (who  seem  to be  French,  Belgian  and  English).  User
interface  used  to consist of a menu where you  could  type  the
number of the article you want to read. Later issues had a mouse-
driven menu.  Quality of English varies considerably depending on
who  authored  a particular article.  Loads of  humour  (BBS  and
internet-sourced  material).  Strictly Underground  and  probably
fairly illegal. One of its earliest issues was reportedly sent to
F.A.S.T.  (the  Federation Against Software Theft) by  MicroMart.
Very  odd.  In January 1993 Mad Vision left the ST scene and  the
magazine was taken over by the Hemorhoids.
 Status: Public domain.
 User interface: Yes. A custom one.
 Latest issue: Issue 4.
 Address:  Used to be Mad Vision W.H.Q.,  BP 19, B-4030 Grivegnee
  1, Belgium.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Armadillo Culture

 An ASCII Internet magazine, described as "the excremeditation of
a  hyperactive  Armadillo's opinions,  and other  stuff."  Sounds
really interesting,  not?  It contains stuff about music,  books,
stories, the works. The lyout is a bit chaotic, which is a bit of
a  bummer  because  that's the only thing  aesthetic  an  on-line
magazine can offer.
 Status: Public domain, on-line.
 User interface: No.
 Latest issue: Issue 6.
 Address:  2857  Foxmill  Rd..  Herndon,  VA  22071,  USA.  Email
  sokay@mitre.org.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Atari Digest

 These  are  messages  and  discussions  taken  off  UseNet   and
consequently  edited.   It  is  primarily  focused  on   American
interests,  and  a treat for the technically interested.  If  you
have a look at their 'latest issue',  below,  you will see it's a
number that suffices to let you know how long they've been  going
on and at what approximate frequency it appears.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: No.
 Latest issue: Last documented one is 206. Probably more.
 Address: Not known.
 Health: Probably still alive.
 Language: English.

Atari Explorer On-Line

 When,  early  1992,  a  magazine called  "Z-Net"  (Cf.)  started
working  together closely with the regular paper magazine  "Atari
Explorer", this on-line magazine was founded. Most of the "Z-Net"
staff  went  to work for this mag  afterwards.  Around  New  Year
1992/1993 Ron Kovacs resumed publication of his  "Z-Net".  "Atari
Explorer On-Line" went on with a new editor, Travis Guy.
 This magazine, incidentally, if often referred to just as 'AEO'.
It's   sortof  bi-monthly  and  contains  lots  of   hot   inside
information  as far as Atari is concerned.  They also do  special
extra dedication issues. Sometimes they get very big with lots of
information and renditions of entire Genie Roundtable  Convention
stuff. Quite incredible.
 When you have a subscription to AEO,  you automatically get  the
Atari Programmer's Journal,  a somewhat more technical compendium
sort of thing that is released once every few months or so.  This
also  includes UUencoded source material at  times.  Additionally
you also get special Jaguar-related issues and "AEO News" issues.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: No.
 Latest issue: Volume  3  Issue 10 (July  2nd  1994);  the  Atari
  Programmer's Journal latest incarnation is issue 4 (March  31st
  1994);  the Jaguar Edition latest issue is #2 (May 27th  1994);
  the latest AEO News issue is #4 (June 18th 1994).
 Address:  Email aeo.mag@genie.geis.com. Internet subscribers can
  request a subscription at stzmagazine-request@virginia.edu.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Atari Power Entertainment Online

 This   is  a  monthly  online  addition  to  the  "Atari   Power
Entertainment"  magazine.  It's  about Lynx and  Jaguars,  and  I
believe the first issue was released in April 1994.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: No.
 Latest issue: April 1994.
 Address:  APE Newsletter, 2104 North Kostner, Chicago, IL 60639,
  USA (send a letter here and you'll get a free ish of the actual
  magazine with an added subscription form). The email address is
  c.smith89@genie.geis.com.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Atari Star

 A  new  disk magazine about which nothing is known  except  that
it's supposed to have released its first issue on March 30th  and
that  it contains sections on computer-related and  non-computer-
related stuff,  interviews with authors and more.  It's  probably
English.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Not known.
 Latest issue: Issue 1.
 Address: Not known.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Atari United!

 Or  "AU!".  A  special preliminary issue  was  released  through
STeve's  Software  at  the  Glendale Atari  Show  in  the  US  in
September.  It  offers news,  reviews,  press  releases,  program
demos,  public  domain  software and any other  information  that
might be of interest to owners of Atari TOS computers.  It has  a
custom  interface  written by Bry Edewaard  and  Scott  Ettinger.
Compatible with any ST/TT/Falcon,  uses any 80-column resolution.
Managing  editor  is Gordie Meyer.  It  explicitly  permits  user
groups  to  republish  its material provided  credits  is  given.
Articles  are  extensive and  well-written,  and  bonus  archives
containing ZIP archives filled with goodies are also found on the
disks. All articles are in one file that is loaded on startup.
 Status:  Commercial (4 issues per year,  US$ 4,95 a piece or US$
  16,00 a year).
 User  interface:  Yes,  a  custom one that's  quite  smooth  and
  entirely GEM-driven.
 Latest issue: Issue 2 (Winter 1994).
 Address:  P.O.  Box 1982,  Ames,  IA 50010-1982.  Email  account
  number biblinski@delphi.com.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Athene

 I   have  never  seen  this  on-line  magazine.   For  sake   of
completeness I have included it here.  Until its 'death' in March
1991  it seemed to focus primarily on fiction,  and seemed to  be
quite like "Quanta" (Cf.).  It was a monthly publication,  edited
by  Jim  McCabe.  After  its death it seems  to  have  gone  into
"Intertext" (Cf.).
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface:  No.
 Latest issue: March 1991, the seventh issue.
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: English.

Auto-Mation

 A  British  (?) disk magazine that started  late  1993.  Initial
impression have been quoted by a PD library to be "very good  and
worth a look anyway". No hands-on experience.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User Interface: Not known.
 Latest issue: Volume 1 Issue 1.
 Address: Not known.
 Health: Probably alive.
 Language: Probably English.

Bad Subjects

 A  magazine  (quote) "intended to promote radical  thinking  and
public  education  about the political implications  of  everyday
life.  We offer a forum for rethinking American 'progressive'  or
'leftist' politics.  We invite you to join us and participate  in
all  aspects of Bad Subjects." Topics you might find in here  are
"Beverly  Hills  90210",  poetry slams,  popular  music  and  the
culture of addiction.
 Wowee!
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: No.
 Latest issue: Not known.
 Address: Email badsubjects-request@uclink.berkely.edu.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Big Night Out Magazine, the

 An English magazine, colour only, edited by Paul Bramwell of The
Corruption  Software Group.  It contains lots of short  articles.
Cute music, nice demos.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes. A custom one.
 Latest issue: Number 2.
 Address: 28 Woodlands, Seaham, Co. Durham, SR7 0EP, England.
 Health: Alive?
 Language: English.

Bits and Bytes Online

 An  electronic  (online)  magazine for  text-based  life  forms,
published  at  irregular intervals,  but 2 or 3 times  per  month
approximately. The editor is Jay Machado.
 Status: Public Domain, online.
 User interface: No.
 Latest issue: Not known.
 Address:  1529 Dogwood Drive,  Cherry Hill, NJ 08003, USA, email
  jaymachado@delphi.com.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Church ST User

 This disk magazine which arose somewhere in 1991 or 1992 is  set
up  by the Reverend Joe Clemson.  Its intent is the forming of  a
forum  for the mutual support of the Atari ST in Christian  Work.
It features Public Domain software,  and tries to promote the  ST
in PC-dominated pious circles.  To give you an indication of what
it  costs,  a subscription to the three 1992 issues  cost  £3.50.
It's mainly aimed at the UK (which is probably infidel enough  to
warrant extra spiritual care).
 Status: Commercial (sortof).
 User interface: Not known.
 Latest issue: Issue 5.
 Address:  33 Cromer Avenue,  Low Fell, Gateshead, Tyne and Wear,
  NE9 6UL, England.
 Health: Alive?
 Language: English.

CIP ST

 This  was the magazine of a German user group,  done  by  editor
Ulrich Veigel.  The last documented issue that got out was  issue
4, of May 1988. The program has an own shell which consisted of a
large  program  in which all articles  were  integrated.  Article
loading times,  thus,  were nonexistent. Loading the program took
quite long, though (it would, wouldn't it?).
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes. A custom one.
 Latest issue: Number 4.
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: German.

Core

 A  literary  internet magazine that  concentrates  on  featuring
quality short fiction,  poetry and essays.  It started in  August
1991  and it usually doesn't exceed a size of about 30  Kb.  It's
editor is Rita Marie Rouvalis.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: None.
 Latest issue:  Volume 2 Issue 4 (April 1993).  Due to  busy-ness
  Rita  hasn't done much lately,  but she'll get back to  it  she
  says.
 Address: Email rita@eff.org.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Crash

 A  description of this magazine goes like "A guide to  traveling
through the underground.  Alternative travel stories,  hints  and
tips". And that's all that is known, except for the fact that the
editors are John Labovitz, Miles Poindexter and Nigel French.
 Status: Public Domain, online.
 User interface: No.
 Latest issue: Not known.
 Address:  519 Castro #7,  San Francisco,  CA 94114,  USA,  email
  johnl@netcom.com.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

CSC

 Nothing known about this,  except for the fact that at least one
issue was made and that it's in French.
 And that it actually exists, of course. Or maybe existed.

Cyberspace Vanguard

 This  online  magazine  carries news and views  of  the  Science
Fiction and Fantasy universe.  Its editor is T.J.  Goldstein, and
the  first,  preview,  issue was released in December  1992.  The
first  real  issue was Volume 1 Issue  1.  It  features  reviews,
articles,  columns, interviews, news, etc., and is spread through
at  least  23  countries  on  six  continents.  It  is  published
approximately bimonthly,  but the editor would eventually like to
do it on a monthly basis provided enough people help with it.
 Personally,  I think this is one helluva brilliant  magazine.  I
have  never  seen so much hot news and stuff (also  about  future
films  and books in general) in one go.  No true  fantasy/science
fiction fan should be without this. If he/she has email, that is.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: No.
 Latest issue: Volume 2 Issue 2 (March 31st 1994).
 Address: Email cn577@cleveland.freenet.edu.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Daily Error

 Probably abortive attempt at a great magazine, said to be French
and the replacement of another magazine (name unknown). It looked
too much like I demo, is claimed.
 Their pre-issue/demo was released around 1991.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Very custom, yes.
 Latest issue: The demo.
 Address: Irrelevant.
 Language: English.

DargonZine

 This  is  yet another on-line magazine.  Its  editor  is  Dafydd
Cyhoeddwr  (I'm  not  sure  whether this  name  should  be  taken
seriously  though,  though  I think this is considered  a  fairly
standard name in Welsh or Irish).  Focuses primarily on  fiction.
It  does stories written for the Dargon Project,  a  shared-world
anthology similar to (and inspired by)  Robert  Asprin's Thieves'
World  anthologies,   created by  David "Orny" Liscomb in his now
retired  magazine,  "FSFNet" (Cf.).  The Dargon  Project  centers
around a medieval-style duchy called Dargon in the far reaches of
the   Kingdom of  Baranur on  the world named  Makdiar,  and   as
such contains stories with a fantasy fiction and  sword'n'sorcery
flavour. It surely sounds very inspired. The magazine seems quite
prolific at times, what with 1990, for example, seeing 11 issues.
Quite irregular, it started in 1988.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: No.
 Latest issue: Volume 7 Issue 1 (February 14th 1994).
 Address: Email white@duvm.Bitnet.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

DBA Magazine

 A  widespread,  very  popular Dutch disk magazine  with  a  user
interface akin "Maggie" (the new version). "DBA" had this kind of
menu before "Maggie", they claim. Custom music, nice menu, smooth
working,  multiple musical pieces,  good graphics, intuitive, OK.
They write in English but one of the submenus is devoted to Dutch
stuff which makes it stand out among the others. They tried doing
monochrome versions,  but they're still colour-only so it  seems.
Issue 4 is a compilation of stuff that appeared in issue 1,  2, 3
and  5  (yes,  strange chronology but  true  nonetheless).  Their
recent issues - up to issue 9 - have taken up two disks.  Issue 9
was  the first attempt at Falcon compatibility and Issue  10  was
Falcon only (and supplied on 1 HD disk).
 The  only thing not totally perfect about "DBA" is that  perhaps
many  of  its articles are a bit bland and the English  tends  to
have  its own biorhythm where general good quality is  concerned.
They have different fonts but don't support text styles.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: A smooth and nice-looking custom one.
 Latest issue: Issue 10 (May 1994).
 Address:  Postbus 506, 9200 AM, Drachten, the Netherlands. Email
  gertk@ttgk.textlitho.nl.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English, with one column in Dutch.

Digital Disk Magazine

 Multi-format (ST/Amiga/PC) magazine, proclaimed non-elitist (you
don't  have to be in a demo crew),  offering coverage  of  topics
such  as Network News,  Digital  Art,  68000  tutorial,  Software
Reviews and,  yes,  short stories.  All different formats have  a
core of the same articles with added platform-specific stuff.  It
also offers PD programs and music modules.  It is distributed  as
"Magic Shadow Archiver" file,  and its editor is Steve Hill.  The
first  issue  was  released  August 1993.  As  of  issue  4  it's
subscription only, which will set you back £8 for 4 issues or £20
for 12.
 Status:  Public Domain before Issue 4,  sortof commercial  after
  that.
 User  interface:  A GEM interface,  not too brilliant  and  very
  slow.
 Latest Issue: Christmas 1993.
 Address:  85 Ceres Road,  Plumstead,  London, SE18 1HL, England.
  Email sh1aoy2@greenwich.ac.uk.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Digital Games Digest

 A  modem  magazine that concentrates on games  reviews  for  all
formats (including PC,  ST, Amiga, handheld, consoles, etc.). Its
editor is Dave Taylor.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: None.
 Latest issue: Unknown.
 Address: Email taylor@limbo.intuitive.com.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Discbox

 A disk mag that took a 'new' approach to the concept, by showing
the  articles  as "Degas" pictures through a  slideshow  program.
Articles were extremely brief,  and about 40-50 pics (i.e. screen
pages) appeared in one issue.  Lots of the screens were dedicated
to ads for the people who put it out, which are the Prophecy P.D.
Library folks. Colour only.
 Status: Commercial.
 User interface: No. Well, maybe 'yes' - a slideshow program.
 Latest issue: Not known.
 Address:  1,571  Dumbarton Road,  Scotstown,  Glasgow  G14  9XE,
  Scotland
 Health: Possibly dead. Not entirely certain, hence the address.
 Language: English.

Disk Magazin

 A short-lived initiative by Timo Schmidt,  who after that became
one  of the staff writers of "Maggie" (Cf.) for  a  while.  "Disk
Magazine" was published in German,  and had a user interface that
was, certainly by today's standards, very clumsy to work with.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes, a custom one.
 Latest issue: Not known.
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: German.

Disk Space

 Though  still  suffering  from the odd bug  in  its  fresh  user
interface,  "Disk Space" is a promising disk magazine that  we're
likely  to  hear  more of in the  future.  Its  editor  is  Jason
Reucassel,  who has nothing against publishing lots of fiction in
his mag - good idea!
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes. A custom one.
 Latest issue: Issue 2. This is quite old by now, actually.
 Address:  10 Stewarts Way, Marlow Bottom, Marlow, Bucks SL7 3QL,
  England
 Health: Alive?
 Language: English.

Disk Times

 A Finnish disk magazine, but thank God (in whom I don't believe)
it's written in English.  It used to be produced by the Universal
Coders (UNC), but they either seem to have renamed into Armade or
these new guys have taken over.  Lots of humour and  stuff,  good
soundtracks (they use tracker music).  Some people find it a  bit
childish, though.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes. A custom one like a large rotating drum.
 Latest issue: Volume 1 Issue 5.
 Address: Unknown.
 Health: Alive?
 Language: English.

Dizzy Diskzine

 This  is not so much a regular disk magazine as a sort of  disk-
based  (non-official)  Dizzy Games helpline.  The  'magazine'  is
updated  once every couple of months and includes all cheats  and
solutions  to  the Dizzy games ("Treasure Island Dizzy"  and  the
other Dizzy Codemasters games). They're done by Chris M. Banham.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: None. Just text files.
 Latest issue: Not applicable. Latest 'version' unknown.
 Address: 36 Chestnut Avenue, Euxton, Lancs PR7 6BS, England.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

DNT Papers

 Although  the  editorial  contents  are in  French  as  well  as
English,   this  mag  leaves  a  good  impression,   even  though
everything seems a bit slow (between screens,  'calculating' when
going  up  or down a page,  etc.).  It's made by  the  DNT  Crew,
consisting  of two chaps that call themselves Flips  &  Pips.  It
only  runs on colour.  As of the third issue the  user  interface
is  a lot better.  The fourth issue proclaimed the  mag's  death,
but then came issue 5. So they're undead or something.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes, a custom one.
 Latest issue: Issue 5.
 Address: 5, Bis Rue de Planchepaleuil, F-63200 Rion, France.
 Health: Alive, or undead maybe.
 Language: French and English.

Erotica

 A new defunct American porn magazine with a mediocre ST  medium-
res  shell,  offering  nudy  pics  and  sex-phone  stories,  like
vibrator reviews and sex book reviews.
 Status: Pubic Domain.
 User interface: Yes, GEM oriented thingy.
 Latest issue: 2.
 Address: Irrelevant.
 Health: Died during The Act.
 Language: English.

Fair Play

 A disk magazine that I only read something about. No details are
known,  but the user interface is said to be crap,  the  articles
few (something like 10) and its directory scattered (source: "RTS
Track").

Falcon Magazine

 A  weekly  but unfortunately rather  short-lived  disk  magazine
especially for the Falcon.  The first issue came out on June 28th
1993. Its editor was Jos van Roosmalen. The first two issues were
text files on disk,  less than 50 Kb in size, and the rest of the
disk was filled with various source material and programs.  It is
a shame that this magazine ceased to exist so quickly, because it
was a most excellent way to get the best from your  Falcon,  even
though  it  was  written in Dutch.  Issue 3 (mid  July)  saw  the
introduction of a GEM interface,  but it was very sloppy  (though
"MultiTOS" compatible!).
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: No.
 Latest issue: Issue 3.
 Address: Not important.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: Dutch.

F.A.S.T.E.R.

 The magazine that started everything with regard to a neat  user
interface  - one of the very earliest ST disk  magazines,  having
started  somewhere  in the autumn of 1986.  It  was  Canadian  of
origin, and I seem to recall that some of the earliest issues had
a  set  of English articles and their  copies  in  French.  Later
issues  were English only.  They were the first that had  a  user
interface,  and  they  survived  only a bit more than  a  year  -
probably because they were commercial, which tends to make things
more complicated than they need be .  Last known issue was Volume
2 Issue 4, and I'm pretty sure that's the final one too.
 The "F.A.S.T.E.R." user group still lives on, so it seems.
 Status: Commercial.
 User interface: Yes. A custom one (the first one).
 Latest issue: Volume 2 Issue 4.
 Address: No longer relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language:  Used to be French and English. Later issues were only
  in English.

Fiction Online

 This  magazine  was launched in spring 1994 and  features  short
stories,  chapters of novels,  acts of plays and  poems.  Initial
contributors  are associated with the Northwest  Fiction  Writers
Group  of Washington,  DC.  It will also publish works  by  other
authors and welcomes submissions from the public.  The editor  is
William (Bill) Ramsay.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: None.
 Latest Issue: Issue 1 (Spring 1994).
 Address: Email ngwazi@clark.net.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

FSFNet

 This  was the forerunner to "DargonZine" (Cf.).  It has  in  the
mean time ceased publication. A total of 11 issues appeared under
editorship of "Orny" Liscomb until 1988. No hands-on experience.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: No.
 Latest issue: Issue 11.
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: English.

Funhouse

 This is,  hold on, "the cyberzine of degenerate pop culture". It
started in March 1993, and is written and edited by Jeff Dove. It
covers a wide variety of topics, some of which are music reviews,
concert  reports,  and books examined.  A most  excellent  online
magazine,  and don't let the name fool you into thinking  they're
not at least halfway seriously interesting.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: No.
 Latest issue: Volume 1 Issue 4 (April 1994).
 Address: Email jeffdove@well.sf.ca.us.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

GEnieLamp Atari ST

 This is the resource magazine covering the Genie (BBS system) ST
RoundTable.  It  offers all information that could  otherwise  be
found  on  Genie,  comprising an enormous  amount  of  up-to-date
information. It is weekly released in ASCII format, but uses some
sort  of  indexing system within the text.  Sometimes  it  offers
pictures as well. It is published by T/TalkNET, and the editor is
Bruce Faulkner.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: No.
 Latest issue: Volume 3 Issue 67 (June 17th 1994).
 Address: Email genielamp@genie.geis.com.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

GRIST On-Line

 This is a journal of electronic network poetry, art and culture.
It's  eclectic,  and will be open to all the language and  visual
art forms that develop on the net. It's an ASCII text file edited
by John Fowler.
 Status: Public Domain, on-line.
 User interface: None.
 Latest issue: Not known.
 Address:  Columbus Circle Sta.,  P.O.  Box 20805,  New York,  NY
  10023-1496, USA, email fowler@phantom.com.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Guildsman, The

 This  is yet another modem magazine spread as  text  file,  this
time being the Journal of Gamers' Guild of UCR.  It is devoted to
role-playing games and amateur fantasy/SF fiction.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: None.
 Latest issue: Not known.
 Address: Not known.
 Health: Probably alive.
 Language: English.

HP Source

 A disk magazine that (also) payed attention to STOS programming,
the  successor to "STOS Bits" (Cf.).  It also payed attention  to
"GfA Basic" and assembler,  and had a much neater user  interface
than its predecessor.  The editor, Leon O'Reilly, decided to call
it quits after issue 2 as he considered it wasn't perfect enough.
Rumours have it that it was intended as sortof an undead "Maggie"
(Cf.) but "Maggie" suddenly went undead all on its own so there.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes, a custom one.
 Latest issue: Issue 2 (released at Ripped Off Convention 1992).
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: English.

HotWired

 "Wired"  is a regular paper cyber/network/whatever  magazine  in
the United States that's incredibly cult and trendy and loads  of
other  good  adjectives (including  "yuppie",  according  to  its
adversaries).  To stay in touch with what it is doing and get  an
interesting  weekly  news mailing,  "HotWired" is  the  thing  to
subscribe   to.   Subscribe  by  sending  a  message   containing
"subscribe hotwire" to the email address mentioned below.  It has
almost  8,400 subscribers (!),  with hundreds added  about  every
week. For help, send "help" instead. End your message with "end".
 With this mail server it is easy to get the full back issues  of
the  real  "Wired" magazine too - all you have to do is  get  all
individial  articles  and  glue them  together.  And  the  actual
"Wired"    is   to   computer/cyberspace   hobbyists   and    all
intelligent  beings  what  "Atari Explorer Online"  is  to  Atari
phreaks.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: None.
 Latest issue: Volume 1 Issue 13 (July 22nd 1994).
 Address: Inforama@wired.com.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

ICTARI

 According  to  an  ad  I  read  somewhere:  "Are  you  an  Atari
programmer? It does not matter which language you use, whether it
be STOS,  assembler,  C,  or whatever takes your fancy,  you  nee
ICTARI,  the  Atari  ST  Programmer's  Disk  Magazine."  Features
sources and ideas for novices and experts alike.
 No hands-on experience.
 Status: Public Domain?
 User interface: Probably yes.
 Latest issue: Not known.
 Address:  ICTARI,  The ATARI Programmer's User Group,  c/o Peter
  Hibbs, 63 Woolsbridge Road,    Ringwood,    Hants.,   BH24 2LX,
  England.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Inc Magazine

 A  disk mag offered by the Incoders,  a demo crew  from  Sweden.
Made by a bunch of real enthusiasts,  but once said (I quote)  to
have  "the effect of a bunch of schoolkids leaping up  and  down"
(source:  "STEN" disk magazine roundup).  Articles were short and
its appeal was limited. One of its writers, one Mr. Cool, went on
to "DBA Magazine" after "Inc Magazine" folded.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes, a custom one.
 Latest issue: Not known.
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: English.

Indy Magazine

 In  mid  1994,  the latest hot thing,  presumably  with  monthly
intent. Little is known about it, however, at current, other than
that it is released by a union of German crews calling themselves
Independent  (some  70  people  in  total,  with  some  excellent
graphics persons).
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Probably yes.
 Latest issue: None yet, except for the demo.
 Address: Unknown.
 Health: Being born.
 Language: Most likely to be German.

Inside Info

 A  bi-monthly  disk magazine published by the  New  South  Wales
section of "ACE" (Atari Computer Enthusiasts).  It's basically  a
magazine  for members,  so it includes meeting minutes and  stuff
like that. Looks OK, especially if you want to stay in touch with
down under.  Has a good shell, but you have to wade through a bit
too much before you can get down to the actual reading.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes, the "Infodisk" shell.
 Latest issue: Issue 69.
 Address:   20  Blairgourie  Circuit,   St.  Andrews,  NSW  2556,
  Australia.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

InSoft Disk Newsletter

 A US disk magazine.  Nothing is known about the amount of issues
that  have  appeared,  and not even if the only  issue  of  which
notice was made (an August 1986 one) was indeed the first one.
 Status: Probably Public Domain.
 User interface: Probably. Not certainly.
 Latest issue: Not known.
 Address: Irrelevant.
 Health: Dead and decomposing.
 Language: English.

Interleave

 A rather excellent disk magazine with literary tendencies  that,
unfortunately,  folded  after  two cult issues that  appeared  in
1991.  Its  editor  was  Tom Zunder,  who  filled  the  mag  with
"software,  music,  films and sex". What more would one want? Tom
continued  writing  for "STEN" (Cf.) and "ST NEWS"  (Cf.)  for  a
while, but was never heard of afterwards.
 Status: Licenceware.
 User interface: The S.A.N.D. shell.
 Latest issue: Number 2.
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: English.

InterText - An Electronic Fiction Digest

 Like its predecessor,  "Athena" (Cf.),  this magazine is devoted
to  publishing  fiction - lots of it.  It's  a  network  magazine
edited by Jason Snell, and has so far come out bi-monthly (except
for  four  month gaps between V1N1 (March 1991)  and  V1N2  (July
1991).  The  first issue was released around March 1991.  It's  a
rather excellent magazine, capably edited and all.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: None.
 Latest issue: Volume  4  Issue 4  (July/August  1994,  the  19th
  issue).
 Address: 21645 Parrotts Ferry Road, Sonora, CA 95370, USA. Email
  jsnell@ocf.berkeley.edu.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: English.

Jag!

 "Jag!" is an on-line Jaguar-dedicated magazine in German.  I  am
not sure when it started exactly,  but probably around the end of
1993 or in January 1994.  Half of it is about Jaguar game reviews
and  all kinds of interesting stuff,  the other half consists  of
advertisements.  It's released every two weeks, and its editor is
Carsten Nipkow.
 Status: Publis Domain, on-line.
 User interface: None.
 Latest issue: 3/94 (February 1994).
 Address: An der Ruthe 9, D-58791 Werdohl, Germany.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: German.

Lavarush

 Unfortunately not much is known about this disk magazine,  as  I
only  found  half an ad of it (in the now  long  defunct  English
"Zero" glossy magazine),  of which I'll share the text with  you:
"Lavarush,  new  ST diskzine for everyone with computer  reviews,
features, music, films,"...
 And,  indeed,  that's  where  it stopped.  More  info  seriously
needed.

Ledgers Magazine

 This  was the demo group "Untouchables" disk  magazine.  It  was
very  enthusiastic  and full of humour  (and  indeed,  seemed  to
consist primarily of it).  Featured short articles,  but many  of
them.  One of the better and definitely one of the most zany disk
magazines around. Their user interface used to be a GEM pull-down
menu but later became a mega-demo-like playfield with  selectable
bunches  of articles as opposed to demo screens.  The editor  and
chief coder was Matt Sullivan.  Neat intros.  Colour  only.  They
seemed to appear about every month, which was quite a feat!
 Status:  Used  to be licenceware,  but shareware as of issue  9.
  Cost £3.
 User interface: Yes. A fully custom one. It differs per issue.
 Latest issue: Issue 13 (September 1992).
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead. Sometimes there's a tiny rumour of life, though.
 Language: English.

Maggie

 Having started in June 1990, "Maggie" (or "Disk Maggie") quickly
became one of the very best ST disk magazines.  It was  initiated
by the British Lost Boys and at the time almost entirely  written
by  Michael  Schussler (a German guy living in  England).  As  of
issue  8,  when  Michael  joined the  Delta  Force,  they  became
unbelievably much better,  with a totally slick menu, much better
music,  picture and a fast page viewer. Definitely one of the top
quality  disk  mags  on the ST ever,  especially  for  the  demo-
admiring fraternity.  Issue 10, though outwardly still brilliant,
was a real low because it featured a lot of rather explicit porn,
making it rather less suitable for the general public.
 A great turnpoint came in 1993 when,  with the release of  issue
11,  "Maggie" turned out to have been taken over by some  British
guys.  All the good bits previously present were now complemented
with much better writing and a healthy dose of  enthusiasm.  From
that issue on,  "Maggie" looks once more to be destined to be one
of the very best disk magazines on the ST,  Falcon-compatible and
all.  The editor is Chris Holland (CIH),  and the mag attempts to
be bi-monthly.
 Remarkably, it works on colour as well as monochrome.
 Status:  Licenceware  (up  to and including  issue  10),  Public
  Domain (later issues).
 User interface: Yes. A nice custom one.
 Latest issue: Number 13 (January 1994).
 Address:  84 North Street,  Rushden,  Northants NN10 9BU, United
  Kingdom.
 Health: Alive.
 Language: Previously English with some German, now only English.

Magnum

 A Polish disk magazine made by the group Illusions (or  Warriors
of Darkness;  maybe they have several names). The first issue was
released in the summer of 1992. Its articles are rather short and
few,  displayed  in  40-column mode.  Only  colour  monitors  are
supported.  It has a custom user interface where the cursor  keys
lead  you through the various options and the space  bar  selects
them. You have several menu screens. The music is in tracker .MOD
format,  and  it quite excellent.  There are several  modules  in
each issue.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface:  A custom one.  Not too excellent,  not too  bad
  either.
 Latest issue: Issue 4.
 Address: Ul. Bukowska 16/25, 32-050 Skawina, Poland.
 Health: Alive?
 Language: Polish.

Massive Mag

 This is a magazine produced by the Admirables,  the editor being
a chap called Claff Moron (let's pray this is not his real name -
no offense,  Claff,  if it is!).  It was made in France, and four
issues have appeared before it died.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes.
 Latest issue: Issue 4.
 Address: Unknown.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: Unknown, but probably French and/or English.

MAST Newsdisk

 In  1988,  ex-US  distributor  of "ST NEWS"  (Cf.)  David  Meile
started  his own disk magazine with the MAST user  group  ("MAST"
was  "Massuchusetts Atari ST" user group).  It was  called  "MAST
Newsdisk",  of  which  only  two issues are known  to  have  been
released  (the last one in April 1988).  It used  the  "Newsdisk"
shell  program.  After  this  magazine  sortof  ceased,  suddenly
nothing was heard of David (he got married somewhere,  I believe)
and "ST NEWS" had to look for another US distribution channel.
 Status: Public Domain.
 User interface: Yes. The "Newsdisk" shell.
 Latest issue: Number 2.
 Address: Not relevant.
 Health: Dead.
 Language: English.

NASA Mag

 This  disk  magazine,  of which little is known except  for  the
fact that at least one issue appeared,  and that it is written in
French and English.  It might be dead,  it might be  alive.  More
information required. 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.