Skip to main content
© Bod

 "Life is a whim of several billion cells to be you for a while."

                   SOFTWARE REVIEWED IN SHORT
                      by Richard Karsmakers
           (with some contributions by Michael Noyce)

 If  I describe something by the phrases of "immaculate  sorted",
"impossibly up-to-date" and "perfectly executed", your minds will
whirr  for  a  short instant after which  all  kinds  of  unnamed
neurons  will lodge in your consciousness the words "ST  Software
News".  Reason enough to shake it a bit, preferably at high speed
whilst  listening  to  Napalm  Death's  new   "Fear,   Emptiness,
Despair",  and  tell  it  that this column has  been  renamed  to
"Software Reviewed in Short", as of the previous issue in fact.
 And  that's precisely the column currently loaded and ready  for
your expert perusal.

Cops'n'Robbers Too

 JV  Enterprises,  an American-based company that is  famous  for
their "Towers" game (which,  however,  I have yet to  see),  have
released  a  stunning load of games into the  shareware  circuit.
Many  of  them are not worth your while,  and some  of  them  are
slightly worth your while.  "Cops'n'Robbers Too",  programmed  in
1992 by Kevin L.  Scott,  falls in the second category.  It's not
flowing over with brilliance but it can keep you entertained  for
half an hour or maybe a bit more.
 It's  a  split-screen two-player simultaneous game (ST  low  res
only)  in  which one player is the cop and the other  player  the
robber.  You drive through a city (the map of which can be saved,
loaded and edited) where the robber has to rob five banks and the
cop basically has to find and arrest the robber before that  goal
is achieved.  You have a limited supply of fuel and you can  just
about  forget  catching up with the other if your  fuel  tank  is
empty  and  you  can't find a gas station  (you  will  move  very
slowly).
 The concept is not too bad,  but some things are failing -  such
as  a hiscore/fastest-time table.  And there are  no  third-party
characters  such  as  other  cars and  old  ladies  crossing  the
streets.  There  are railway tracks but there are no trains  that
obstruct  them.  There are patches of oil but they  never  really
throw you off your mark.
 "Cops'n'Robbers" is a game with the potential of "A.P.B." on the
Lynx, but unfortunately it's not even worth the US$ 5 it takes to
register. Someone who finds the concept appealing (or, such as I,
who  has  a girlfriend who loves playing the bad guy)  will  find
himself playing it for about an hour max.
 I realize the inclusion of extra characters would cost processor
time,  but  now  there are loads of objects  already  that  flash
colours without them actually having a purpose.
 The  game needs one meg of memory and works on  any  system.  On
Falcon  or  TT you have to turn off cache  and  switch  processor
speed to 8 Mhz to make it playable.  And don't forget to boot  in
low res,  for the programmers seems unaware of the XBIOS(5)  call
to change screen res on start-up.

Ease 3.1

 I haven't got a clue where people still get the energy needed to
design and develop new alternative desktops such as "NeoDesk" and
"Gemini". I would have thought two were enough, but then you have
"TeraDesk"  and the older "KaosDesk",  and recently my  attention
was  caught by "Ease",  a new alternative desktop by  Application
Systems Heidelberg.
 "Ease"  is  a  program that adds additional  features  to  those
offered  by  the  normal workspace (the desktop)  of  your  Atari
computer,  to make your working easier.  For example, The windows
in "Ease" have additional elements:  With a single click, you may
close a window or send it to the background. For faster access to
programs or files you can drag an icon out of a window and  place
it on the desktop.
 The  following  list of features is only a  selection  of  those
offered by "Ease".

O    Folders,  programs  and other files may be dragged onto  the
     desktop and from there opened, copied and started.
O    Dragging  a file icon onto a program icon will  execute  the
     application and use that file as a parameter.
O    Programs can be executed from the keyboard.
O    Programs can be assigned standard parameters and paths  that
     will then be used each time the program is started.
O    The contents of a file can be displayed in a window.
O    TOS programs can be run within windows;  their output can be
     intercepted by "Ease" and can later be displayed in a window
     and saved to a file.
O    Text  within windows can be displayed using  any  GDOS-fonts
     (so long as GDOS has been installed).
O    Many  options  are  available  for  the  display  of   drive
     directories within windows:
     O  Text and icon display.
     O  Any GDOS fonts for the display of text.
     O  Selection of text items (size, time, date).
     O  Multi-column text display if desired.
     O  Display  options  can be selected individually  for  each
        window.
O    A  command is provided to search for files  across  multiple
     drives.
O    The  currently available free space on a drive can be  shown
     in the appropriate window.
O    A  new  window can be automatically opened  to  display  the
     directory contents of a folder.
O    The  display options for directories (Text or icon  display,
     text  size,  window  positions and size) can  be  made  path
     dependant and saved.
O    Scrolling a window that contains selected items will not de-
     select those items.
O    All  items within a directory can be selected with a  single
     command.
O    Selected programs can be installed in a menu list.
O    The copying and deletion of files and folders can be handled
     by the rapid file copier "Kobold".
O    The  size  of  windows  can  be  automatically  adjusted  to
     correspond to the space required to show their contents.
O    "Ease"  runs on all Atari-ST/STE/TTs and the Falcon with  at
     least  one megabyte of main memory and a monitor capable  of
     displaying at least 640*200 pixels.  "Ease" also works  with
     Mag!X and under MultiTOS.

 As you see,  basically "Ease" can't do anything "NeoDesk" can't.
As  I got the whole thing together with a load of Public  Domain,
it might very well be PD of shareware. But I'm not certain.

Grammarian

 "Grammarian"  by Dan Panke is a program that checks  text  files
for possible grammatical mistakes.  However,  with respect to the
[ ###############################################################
Possible Grammatical Error
  Error or mistake?
    ERROR - an act involving a departure from truth or accuracy
    MISTAKE - a misunderstanding
############################################################### ]
author and no foul intent, it's pretty useless. You can specify a
[ ###############################################################
Possible Grammatical Error
  Its or it's?
    ITS - is the possessive
    IT'S - is the contraction of 'it is'
############################################################### ]
text  file  to  be checked and the result will  be  a  huge  file
littered with suggestions and "possible grammatical errors." Each
[ ###############################################################
Possible Grammatical Error
  Error or mistake?
    ERROR - an act involving a departure from truth or accuracy
    MISTAKE - a misunderstanding
############################################################### ]
time  when  "its"  or  "it's" is  encountered  is  throws  in  an
explanation  of  the  difference  between  the  two.  It  doesn't
[ ###############################################################
Possible Grammatical Error
  Among or between?
    AMONG - use when reference is to more than two
    BETWEEN - use when reference is made to only two persons
############################################################### ]
actually check the syntax of a line,  which is something far more
useful.
 "Grammarian"  is basically an extended kind of spelling  checker
that  recognizes individual words and then attaches a message  to
them.  In most of the cases,  at least if you're not totally crap
[ ###############################################################
Possible Grammatical Error
    MOST OF THE - Use "most".
############################################################### ]
[ ###############################################################
Possible Grammatical Error
  Almost or most?
    ALMOST (adv.) - nearly
    MOST - an adj., an adv. of comparison, a pronoun: most people,
    most beautiful, most of them
############################################################### ]
at  English,  it will just provide you with needless  information
that you already knew. If you want to get totally frustrated, try
[ ###############################################################
Possible Grammatical Error
  All ready or already?
    ALL READY - entirely ready (The work is all ready for you.)
    ALREADY - action has occurred (I have already finished the
    work.)
############################################################### ]
and  run an issue of "Twilight World" (a 100 Kb on-line  fiction-
only ST NEWS spin-off magazine) through it.  I did. Thank heavens
there was the [Esc] key.
 I  think "Grammarian" launched rather too high  expectations  in
[ ###############################################################
Possible Grammatical Error
  Feel or think?
    FEEL - to perceive or become aware of by the senses: to feel
    the prick of a pin
    THINK - to produce or form in the mind; conceive mentally: to
    think evil thoughts
############################################################### ]
[ ###############################################################
Possible Grammatical Error
  Expect or suspect?
    EXPECT - to regard as likely to happen
    SUSPECT - to doubt the truth of
############################################################### ]
me.  For  people who really don't trust their English it  may  be
[ ###############################################################
Possible Grammatical Error
  Who or whom?
    WHO - used when the somebody has been the actor
    WHOM - refers to someone who has been the object of an action
        A nineteen-year-old woman, to whom the room was rented,
        left the window open.
        A nineteen-year-old woman, who rented the room, left the
        window open.
############################################################### ]
useful,  or  perhaps  for  people who have  a  German  or  French
[ ###############################################################
Possible Grammatical Error
  Who or whom?
    WHO - used when the somebody has been the actor
    WHOM - refers to someone who has been the object of an action
        A nineteen-year-old woman, to whom the room was rented,
        left the window open.
        A nineteen-year-old woman, who rented the room, left the
        window open.
############################################################### ]
document file on their hands and want to translate it to  English
but who are not English themselves.
[ ###############################################################
Possible Grammatical Error
  Who or whom?
    WHO - used when the somebody has been the actor
    WHOM - refers to someone who has been the object of an action
        A nineteen-year-old woman, to whom the room was rented,
        left the window open.
        A nineteen-year-old woman, who rented the room, left the
        window open.
############################################################### ]

 To illustrate my point, I have had the above bit of this article
processed  by "Grammarian".  It has a few things to say that  are
useful  but  I  think you have to agree that  most  of  it  isn't
really.

Grotesque Demo
by Michael Noyce

 This  demo is a 1 Mb STE-only affair by Equinox of  France.   It
starts with a simple but effective intro,  once past that you are
greeted with a thunderous soundtrack accompanied by an  explosion
of colour and various strobe effects.  Yes, it's rave time!  Turn
down the lights, crank up the stereo, send out any epiletics, and
have your own personal rave party in your room!
 Numerous  images  of objects and logos flashed onto  the  screen
almost  too  fast  to see (my favourite has to be  the  cow)  and
there's  also a short digitized animation a Kim Basinger  in  the
throes  of passion (fear not moralists,  you only see her  head!)
that pops up from time to time.   There are also vector  graphics
as  well,  drums  that  beat in time to the  music  and  morphing
objects,  and finally there are the dancers (or  ravers).   These
are  digitized animations shown in silhouette that dance  to  the
music, very similar to the dancing woman in the opening titles of
the  "Tales of the Unexpected" TV series and several  James  Bond
films.
 A great demo, depending on your musical persuasion, with crystal
clear,  high-quality music with top notch visual presentation.  I
personally  dislike rave and house 'music'  intently,  but  still
find myself loading this demo up from time to time.

High-Fidelity Dreams Demo
by Michael Noyce

 I came across this demo whilst downloading software from an  FTP
site  in Germany when I was staying with a friend at  university.
The  description given said this was the best music demo  on  the
ST,  featuring  over thirty minutes of digitized  music.   I  was
quite sceptical at the time, but downloaded it anyway.  It wasn't
until  I got home later the next day and started sifting  through
the  numerous  disks of software I'd obtained that  I  discovered
that my scepticism was unfounded.
 The  demo,  by Aura,  features eight original tunes composed  by
various  musicians and are of the highest quality.   The  samples
used  are excellent and many of the tunes sound very  Jarre-esque
indeed - I have no idea if this was just coincidence or not.   On
an ST the playback sample rate is a very respectable  16kHz,  but
on  an STE it's an amazing 50kHz!   The music is  accompanied  by
four  VU-bars  that tumble,  spin,  and move in and  out  of  the
screen, there is also a bubble that tracks around the screen from
which letters spread across the screen to form messages.
 Perhaps the most surprising,  and pleasing,  thing about  "Hi-Fi
Dreams"  is that it works on half meg machines (just!),  it  even
takes advantage of the Mega STE's faster processor,  switching it
to 16MHz when depacking the tunes.
 All the people I've shown this demo to have been very impressed,
and  it's a must for Jarre fans.   Bruised lower jaws  are to  be
expected  when  seeing  this demo for  the  first  time.   Highly
recommended!

Lasers and Men v1.0

 In  the previous I already mentioned an earlier version  of  the
"Doom"  style  shareware game "Lasers and Men"  for  the  Falcon.
Well,  in the mean time version 1.0 has been released. It's still
far  from perfect but there are plenty of levels (once  you  have
registered your copy,  that is, and obtained the password to open
them up to you) for the game to be quite enjoyable.
 It should be noted that the game isn't finished.  Not by far, as
a matter of fact.  The author,  Arnaud Linz,  is still working on
improvements,  and  version  1.0  does  not  include  the  "body"
graphics of most characters because a virus apparently  destroyed
the  corresponding  graphics files just before this  version  was
supposed to be released.
 I  registered  this program nonetheless because I  feel  efforts
like these need to be supported heavily.  Registration costs  100
French  Francs  or  US$ 10.  It's a small price to  pay  for  the
thought  of  a  program with such  a  brilliant  potential  being
further developed on the Falcon.

Mouse-Ka-Mania II

 "Mouse-Ka-Mania  II"  is  an accessory  written  by  Charles  F.
Johnson  of  Little Green Footballs  software.  He  describes  it
himself as an Animated Mouse Installer on Mega-Steroids, which is
quite exactly what it is.  With the accessory loaded you can have
any mouse shape replaces by either a different single shape or  a
set   of  animated  frames.   The  accessory  also   allows   the
loading/saving  and editing of these sets (or,  for that  matter,
the  now sortof redundant single shapes).  If you don't  want  to
spend  a  valuable accessory slot you can use  a  small  resident
"AUTOMOUS.PRG"  program that you can put in the AUTO  folder  and
you  will have only the changed and/or animated mice without  the
editor installed.  As this small AUTO program contains all  mouse
shapes and such, it needs to be generated by the accessory, which
is really easy to do.
 Some  of you may not be aware that the mouse has more  ready-to-
use  shapes other than the OPEN HAND (to move stuff),  the  ARROW
(...err...)  and the BUSY BEE.  Others are the TEXT  EDIT  cursor
(used to locate text insertion points,  mark blocks,  etc.),  the
POINTING FINGER (sometimes used instead of the arrow),  the  THIN
CROSSHAIR (used in paint programs to mark sections of a picture),
the  THICK  CROSSHAIR  and  the  OUTLINED  CROSSHAIR  (not   used
particularly often, if at all).
 And  now you can all change their shapes and make them  animate.
If  you don't want to draw all the shapes yourself you will  feel
relieved if I tell you "MKM II" comes with quite a lot of  sample
files.  And among them is also the Apple MacIntosh running  clock
that you can use to replace the BUSY BEE. A nice touch.
 "Mouse-Ka-Mania  II"  is  shareware,  and costs you  US$  15  to
register.  I  personally  think  US$  10  would  have  been  more
realistic  but,  then  again,  I  have no  idea  what  amount  of
programming went into it.  And,  after all,  it's compatible with
any ST/TT/Falcon and works with "Geneva" or the "Crazy Dots" card
as well. And it's really user-friendly.

Multi-Briques 1.02

 Chris of "Maggie" some time ago sent me some Falcon  stuff.  One
of the items was "Multi-Briques", and I'm not sure whether it's a
PD game,  or shareware,  or commercial,  and I suspect neither is
Chris.
 Anyway,  it's  basically an "Arkanoid" clone with the  exception
that  there  are four sides where the  ball  can  disappear,  the
blocks  to  destroy are located at the centre of the  screen  and
you have four 'bats'.
 Let me tell you right away that it's a bastard of a  game,  much
too  difficult to play - at least with a   regular  joystick.  It
also  support  the Atari Joypad but I haven't got  one  of  those
unfortunately.  Basically you control both side bats going up and
down with the joystick,  and the upper/lower bats are  controlled
with  left/right movements.  The big problem is that there  is  a
certain  time  needed  for them to  move.  If  they  would  react
immediately without having to abide to all these laws of  physics
(like in all other "Arkanoid" type game I know,  and I know  lots
of  'em)  it  would be more managable.  But  it  isn't.  You  can
also play with the keyboard, but I never got the hang of that.
 The  other  bits are good.  The soundtrack is  good,  the  intro
pictures are excellent,  and the whole presentation is thoroughly
in  order  (except  for the fact that it's  all  in  French).  It
supports  up to four players,  and needs a fair amount of  memory
(with 4 Mb you shouldn't have too many accessories installed).
 If you're interested in obtaining this game - which is  probably
worth  your while if you have one of them joypads (yes,  the  Jag
ones), contact the people at the address below.

 PARX
 35 Rue du Jeu de Paume
 F-53000 Laval
 France

Rainbow

 There really aren't many Falcon-specific drawing programs that I
think really do justice to the machine.  OK, there are a few, but
in  each  instance  I thought the user  interface  messy  or  the
running conditions shabby.  If you have suffered, like me, from a
kind  of "NeoChrome Master" for the Falcon,  you need  suffer  no
more.  Addiction  Software,  from Sweden,  have programmed a  16-
bit (!) true (65536) colour Falcon drawing program that will make
your  orifice  go drool and  your stomach  churn.  Its  name  is,
simply, "Rainbow".
 On the contrary to many drawing programs, it doesn't use GEM and
is programmed,  like "NeoChrome",  in 100% assembler.  It's  fast
because of that, yet uncommonly well-behaved. As a matter of fact
it's  the only program I have that switched resolutions and  then
switches  back  properly to the resolution you  started  in  when
you're using a screen enhancer such as "BlowUp 030".
 The user interface is simple. There are various buttons to click
-  left  mouse activates them,  right mouse  configures  them  if
possible.
 The user interface is bigger than a full screen,  which means it
starts scrolling smoothly when your mouse reaches the  edges.  In
itself  this  is  a great idea but on me it  has  the  effect  or
churning my stomach like mentioned earlier.  I mean it's a  great
program,  by I start feeling ill when looking too much at a large
VGA  screen  scrolling like that.  I guess  that's  idisyncratic.
Screw me!
 "Rainbow" can load/save a fair amount of picture formats:  TIFF,
Targa,  .TPI, "NeoChrome" and (un)compressed "Degas". Not exactly
a stunning list (I would have liked to see .IFF and .GIF too,  as
well as,  possibly,  .JPG), but I trust it will suffice. Weirdly,
TIFF files saved by "Imagecopy 3" are considered to be  incorrect
and can't be loaded.
 I  think  I really like about "Rainbow" is  that  everything  is
'real time',  including the zoom.  Also, there's a quick and easy
way  to  select colours:  Simply determine the  colours  on  four
corners  of a quadrangle and the quadrangle itself  will  display
all  appropriate shades within an instant.  All possible  colours
are always in the screen, too, in an extended palette.
 Demos  of it are available in the Public Domain,  and  the  real
thing costs £29.95, which is a good price for a drawing program I
think.  As a matter of fact I will be trying to get a review copy
for the next issue of ST NEWS.
 People in the UK who want to purchase "Rainbow", or companies in
the  UK that want to become "Rainbow" retailers,  should  contact
JCA.  Others  should  contact  Addiction  Software.  If  you  buy
"Rainbow"  now  you will get the possibility to  upgrade  to  the
vastly more powerful version 2.0 for £5.

 JCA Europe Ltd.
 30a School Road
 Tilehurst
 Reading
 Berkshire RG3 5AN
 England
 Tel. ++44-734-452416
 Fax. ++44-734-451239

 Addiction Software
 P.O. Box 5012
 S-451 05 Uddevalla
 Sweden
 Fax. ++46-522-75872

Revenge Doc Displayer

 Stuart  Coates,   one  of  the  utterly  cool  chaps  with  whom
interviews were done in this issue of ST NEWS,  is the programmer
of "Revenge Doc Displayer". Normally this program would have been
on  the ST NEWS disk but we ran rather too full  of  articles.  I
sensed a new quantity and quality record coming up,  so it had to
go...  (sorry Stuart).  Anyway,  "Revenge Doc Displayer" replaces
your  computer's text display routine by a much faster  and  more
comfortable one.
 It's fairly simple,  really. All you have to do is install "RDD"
as  the  application  to load when ".TXT" and  ".ASC"  files  are
clicked on (like you would ".DOC" with a word processor,  or ".S"
with an assembler, or ".GFA" with "GfA Basic"). The "RDD" install
program can do all of that for you if you want.
 Basically,  you  get just the "RDD" installation  program.  That
program can install it, write the actual "RDD" module and, if you
want to,  the documentation file.  A future version, currently in
preparation,  will  allow  for even more stuff to  be  specified.
Apart from text it will also be able to play samples.
 Upon  text  being  fed to "RDD",  the entire  file  is  read  in
memory.  Going to the bottom and then back up is no problem.  You
can  search for words,  too,  or print out the whole document  or
parts  of  it.  There  are numerous other options  (such  as  the
ability  to load and read .TXT files compressed with "Pack  Ice")
that no doubt you will find if you check it out - and there is no
reason   why  you  shouldn't  because  it's  shareware   with   a
registration  fee of a paltry £5 that certainly literally  anyone
can afford.
 If you want to get the program,  I suggest you send a disk  plus
sufficient IRCs to the address below. As a matter of fact, unless
you already own a program like "View II" (which is commercial)  I
suggest you send on £5 right away to register and get the  latest
version.
 The address is:

 Mark Matts
 66 Telford Way
 Leicester LE5 2LX
 England

 It may sound very confusing...Stuart Coates...Mark Matts...  but
this  is easily explained.  Stuart programs it but tends to  move
around quite a bit.  Mark is a good friend and doesn't move quite
as often.  Mark gets the dosh,  sends off the disks and stuff and
gives Stuart what's left of the dough.

Shocker

 Please,  before you read anything about "Shocker" or its sequel,
read the notes on "Thriller", below.
 "Shocker"  (full name "Shocker 1 - Mad Martin's Revenge")  takes
the "Thriller" concept - including the rather droll samples -  to
a  higher  level.  This time keyboard/joystick control  has  been
replaced  by the mouse,  and different kinds of levels have  been
introduced.  Whereas "Thriller" consisted of various incarnations
of  ditches  in which your ball could roll,  "Shocker"  also  has
levels without ditches (i.e.  you can go anywhere) and  so-called
'hypnosis' levels.  The non-ditch levels are even more similar to
some of the stuff in "Chip's Challenge", including pushing blocks
in holes and the like. The hypnosis level is in trenches too, but
you have yourself and (an) enemy ball(s) moving mindlessly  (like
lemmings,  only different).  By feeding the ball certain commands
you can make it turn up/down/left/right at the next junction,  or
have  it turn around.  This is very difficult,  because there  is
never quite enough time to move your mouse to quickly get another
attribute .
 There's a two-player mode as well, and various other bits that I
haven't  tested  or  discovered  because  I  simply  couldn't  be
bothered to get that far. You have to understand I have a limited
amount  of time and "Shocker" is one of those games that can  eat
away  huge chunks of it.  I will keep my Falcon and  these  games
until  I retire.  Then I will be able to play them as much as  my
heart condition will allow.

                *** Small angriness interrupt ***

 How the hell do you spell angriness? Angriness or angryness. The
latter looks like the name of a planet and the first looks like a
vegetable. Advise would be welcome at the correspondence address.
 However, this is not exactly what I'm writing here for.
 In  actual fact the reason why I'm writing this is the  BBC.  Or
possible  some  means between the BBC and my  own  tele.  Anyway,
read the rest of this and you'll see why.

 I  like "Red Dwarf".  I like the books,  the  T-shirts  and,  of
course, the TV series.
 I  like  them to such extent,  as a matter of fact,  that  I  am
taping all episodes.  Even though the BBC does not broadcast them
in the right order (at least not with the series IV airing before
and  around the Soccer World Championship) that makes me a  happy
person.  It makes me feel good inside to know that I can sit down
and  watch any episode I want to enjoy the excellent humour  that
easily outdoes the "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" TV series.
 Anyway,  here  I  was,  21:50 European  Daylight  Savings  Time,
Friday,  July 31st 1994. On video tapes I already have the entire
series I,  II and III. On previous airings, some years ago, I had
already taped substantial amounts of the IV-VI  series.  However,
what with series IV being broadcast again I could finally get two
episodes  I  had  mysterously  missed out  first  time  around  -
"Justice" and "Camille".
 At  21:50 I switched to the BBC,  catching the last  minutes  of
what is probably the most boring of TV series. It's a thing about
trees and plants,  and about the elderly displaying their biggest
beet  root  for  other elderly  people  to  gape  at.  Yes,  it's
"Gardener's World".
 At random intervals the picture quality faded,  eventually to be
replaced  by  a colourful test screen telling  me  something  was
wrong with the reception.  "BBC 2", "PTT TELECOM", "GOES". That's
what it said.
 There I was,  about to tape the only remaining episode I  lacked
of "Red Dwarf" series IV,  "Camille". There I was, not out in the
bar  where  I drink Guiness and play darts every  Friday  evening
with other members of "V.I.R.U.S" (~Society of Intensely  Rocking
Utrecht Students).
 There I was,  actually cursing at the screen because,  somewhere
along  the line,  somebody or something prevented me from  taping
it.
 I watched "Camille".  Sound remained for most of the time and it
was  a  hilarious episode that,  though I was  feeling  extremely
pissed off, caused me to roll across the couch with laughter. But
I couldn't tape it.  At times the sound went,  transforming  into
sheer random noise.  And half of the time - or more - the picture
was ghostly or just gone to be replaced by this colourful and not
particulartly creative screen.
 I am not feeling happy now. Not at all. And that was something I
wanted to share with the world.

            *** End of small angriness interrupt ***

 (I still think it sounds like a vegetable)

 (Now  I  come  to think of it,  the  word  "angriness"  probably
doesn't exist,  nice though it sounds. I think I should have used
"anger" instead. But, what the heck. It's nice the way it is)

Shocker II

 I  watch  the screen and sudenly I see  the  swirlin',  twirlin'
antics of eddies in the space-time continuum.  Suddenly,  I  find
myself back in ST NEWS Volume 9 Issue 1...

 "Shocker 2", the sequel to "Shocker" and "Thriller", is a German
shareware  game  for  ST/TT/Falcon computers with  at  least  one
megabyte  of  memory  (on  TT  and Falcon  you  have  to  use  ST
compatibility  monochrome  mode;  on the TT you  have  to  switch
off  the  cache and on the Falcon you have to disable  the  title
sound by renaming a file).
 In  the mean time a colour version of the game,  now also  fully
Fslcon-compatible, has been released.
 In the game you control a ball that may or may not be subject to
gravity  and that can be given special abilities upon  collection
certain icons found on the play field.  You are presented with  a
bird's-eye view and the ball is controlled with the mouse whereas
it can,  for example,  jump with the left mouse button.  You  can
play it on your own or with two people via null-modem cable, with
the latter option allowing both "team" and "duel" play.
 Basically "Shocker 2" is three games in one, identifiable by the
three different kinds of rooms you can encounter.
 First  there are the rooms with gravity.  This means  your  ball
will be sucked to the bottom of the screen.  You have to  collect
jump  icons (and evade the ones that take away some of your  jump
power) to get higher.  It's a bit like "Bounder" on the C-64  but
in  a platform environment.  Mysterious steps roam  some  levels,
stealing   bonuses   and  hearts.   Especially  the   latter   is
particularly devious,  as it is the hearts you have to collect to
finish  a level.  There's also an icon you can get that  switches
gravity  off.  The game will then transform into a platform  game
where you have a bird's eye view.  The ball just rolls where  you
tell it to.  In this mode,  it has elements of "Bounder", "Chip's
Challenge" and even "Pacman".
 Then   there  are  the  rooms  with  pneumatic   postpipes   (or
'pipelines'  in  short).  Here  you  have to  move  the  ball  on
pipelines  that  form a pattern around  the  levels.  You  cannot
normally  leave the pipeline.  You have to evade or  jump  across
nasty  thingies that haunt the pipeline,  negotiate holes in  the
pipelines,  and still collect all hearts.  This mode has elements
of "Super Pipeline" (Commodore 64), "Qix" (the thingies that move
on the pipe),  "Chip's Challenge" again,  and possibly one or two
other games.  The mixture makes everything original, fresh, and a
joy to play.  On these levels you have to deliver the hearts to a
"H"  icon,  and once you've collected them all you need to go  to
the exit ("E" icon).
 The third and rather most dissimilar kind of room is the  "trace
setting room". Your ball is ready to be launched, but you have to
make sure that it can get all the hearts on a level without  ever
stopping  or  without  your interaction.  You  have  to  position
deflection  arrows  on  strategic positions to  prevent  it  from
hitting  the  wrong  objects and to make sure  it  gets  all  the
hearts.  The  ball  moves on a steady speed  once  launched,  and
cannot  be  influenced  by anything other  that  said  deflection
arrows.  This game adds influences of Gremlin's "Deflector", only
here it's a ball instead of a light beam.
 The program is very addictive, at times extraordinarily original
and  well  designed (the user interface can even  switch  between
German and English).  The shareware registration fee is (a rather
hefty)  60  German  marks,  for which you will get  a  code  book
containing,  among  other things,  the password you will have  to
enter to be able to play beyond level 10 of the 100 in total. The
game  is  made  by Hintzen & Verwohlt GbR,  "Two  Men  at  Work",
Marienkirchweg 3a,  D-48165 Muenster,  Germany,  Tel. 0251/232295
(Mon-Fri from 4.30  PM).  I believe they charge DM 5 to send  the
disk, so you might as well have a go at that to check out if it's
worth registering (I am quite sure you'll think it is).
 I  have  not been able to check out the two-player  mode  (which
even  works across a phone line with 2400 baud  modem).  I  think
this  option  will add quite a lot to the game if  you  have  the
ability  - like "Tetris" on the Gameboy being  merely  fiendishly
addictive in one-player mode yet becoming even innumerable  times
more so once connected with a fellow Gameboy.
 This game is much worth checking out.  I myself will register as
soon  as I have some dosh to spare (I have a list of  about  five
programs I want to register some day soon).
 I have in the mean time registered "Shocker II" and those  other
programs I had on the list
.

 For  a  brief  instant  the pinks and  purples  of  the  various
loopholes  in time and space worm back to reality as I  know  it.
Suddenly I find myself...back in ST NEWS Volume 9 Issue 2.

Snacman

 Another shareware game here,  this time an ST (STE enhanced and,
yes, Falcon compatible!) "Pacman" clone by the name of "Snacman".
It's  a capably programmed job with a nice soundtrack that's  not
too irritating and that changes with every level.  Level's  don't
have different layouts,  just different background fill graphics.
It's  programmed  by  Impact  Software  (a  UK  outfit)  and  the
registration fee is an almost absurdly low £2.
 The  graphics are nice and gameplay is OK.  They have added a  2
player  mode  and even a 3 player mode,  but these  seem  totally
useless to me.  Even when you have 2 joysticks,  only one  person
will actually be using one in two-player mode.  And,  to top  off
everything, the second player is actually one of the ghosts! This
might  be original and all,  but to me it would have made  a  lot
more  sense  if there would have been a two-player  mode  (either
simultaneous  or  in sequence) where each would  be  a  "Pacman".
Being  a ghost is very boring - you can't actually  eat  anything
and you just have to hunt down the Snacman.  This stuff is better
left to the computer,  I think,  limiting the usefulness of  this
game to its single-player mode.
 And even then there are a few things I don't like about it. When
you  die,  for example,  you have to start all over again on  the
level.  This is an irritating thing.  I've always hated that in a
game, and I suspect many would agree with me. On the good side is
the  fact  that  it saves  hiscores  and,  of  course,  that  the
registration fee is a mere £2.  That makes it worth  registering,
and makes you hope Impact will come up with a truly good game  in
the near future.

ST Zip 2.6

 For those of you who got their hands on "ST Zip" version 2.5  it
was  pretty evident that something needed to be done  about  some
quite  serious bugs that had found their way into  it.  Well,  it
happened and Vincent Pomey has released version 2.6.
 These were the bugs:

O    First file in a ZIP archive didn't extract in GEM. This is
     fixed.
O    Create directory in GEM had some new and different problems.
     This is fixed.
O    Temporary  directory name was cleared at the  appearance  of
     the configuration box. This is now fixed.
O    The  'no  file(s)'  problem occuring randomly  in  CLI  when
     extracting files from a ZIP with subdirectories fixed.
O    It  was impossible to extract only one file in CLI  if  some
     files  with the same name are in subdirectories of the  ZIP.
     Fixed.  Note,  however  that using 'stzip -xr  test  readme'
     extracts all the readme files from the zip.
O    Empty subdirectories were stored when using 'stzip -ar  test
     readme'. Fixed.
O    Maximum numbers of parameters in CLI increased to 100.

 There  is not much to say other than this you should try to  get
this version of "ST Zip" as soon as possible.  Like was concluded
in  the  previous issue of ST NEWS,  there really is  no  archive
program  better and more user-friendly than "ST Zip" (never  mind
good  user  interface  efforts for ARC and LZH such  as  "Two  in
One"). Get it as soon as you can!

Tautology

 Have  you  ever  played the "Match It"  game  in  Delta  Force's
"Syntax  Terror" demo?  Well,  this is basically the  same,  only
better.  Programmed by Leon O'Reilly (Pele of of Reservoir Gods),
it's  a Falcon-only game that runs using RGB  overscan.  It  also
works on VGA, but not the way it should. It can support up to two
players on screen simultaneously,  and can even use of the  Atari
Joypad (yes, the same thing you would need to play "Llamazap").
 Well,  what's the game about?  Basically you get a grid of tiles
with pictures on them that you have to clear away by clicking  on
two identical tiles.  However, a line drawn from one to the other
should consist only of directly vertical and/or horizontal  parts
with no more than two 90 degree turns without a tile interfering.
The person to get the tiles cleared first wins.
 The  difference between "Tautology" and other games of  its  ilk
are the options. You can configure the tiles (the amount of tiles
that  are the same),  load in different tile graphics and play  a
host of different two-player games (separate or competitive mode,
different or same tile sets).
 The  game  saves hiscores too and is pretty  addictive.  I  have
reason  to  believe that a VGA-compatible version will  be  coded
soon,  especially because I told Leon that with the "Blowup  030"
screen  expander  you  get approximately the  right  screen  size
anyway.
 If  you're interested in obtaining a copy,  try contacting  Leon
himself (enclose enough IRCs though!).

 Leon O'Reilly
 Cwm Cottage
 Abermule
 Montgomery
 Welshpool
 Powys SY15 6JL
 Wales
 U.K.
 Email cmslorei@uk.ac.livjm.vax

Thriller

 German  software company Hintzen & Verwohlt have held hight  the
German   arcade  puzzle  games  tradition  initiated  by   famous
monochrome  games  such  as "Oxyd" (and there  are  more).  As  a
matter of fact,  "Thriller" is the first of a sequence of  three,
the  other  two  being called "Shocker"  and  "Shocker  II"  (see
further down in this article).
 In  "Thriller"  you control a ball that can move over  kindof  a
trench.  There  are  hearts to be  collected,  and  after  having
collected all hearts (or sometimes a few less,  where the  others
are  simply bonus hearts) one of the objects that previously  you
moved  under will transform into an "E" object  (exit).  However,
sometimes  these change into "N" or "P" (for next  or  previous).
There are enemy balls as well - if you touch those you're dead.
 As new play elements are introduced, moving atop them will cause
info texts to be displayed on the screen - i.e.  a learning  mode
similar to that excellent option in "Chip's Challenge". Every few
levels you get a secret code that is, however, different for each
player  (player  names and secret codes are stored in  a  special
configuration file).
 You  will have to think quite a lot,  and sometimes it  will  be
hard  to believe a level can actually be solved (level 3  already
had me thinking that for the first time).
 The  problem with "Thriller" is its availability -  or,  rather,
total lack of it.  It's available through PD libraries all right,
but  if  you  want to register (by sending DM  60  to  Hintzen  &
Verwohlt)  you will notice that they don't support the  game  any
more.  I  suppose they'll send you "Shocker" and/or "Shocker  II"
though, which are really "Thriller" with more of the good stuff.
 Maybe  you can find someone who has already completed  the  game
and buy their codeword book off them.
 Quite  a  good game.  On TT,  you must remember  to  switch  off
processor cache;  on the Falcon you must select "no intro  tune".
It  will work in ST compatible high resolution on systems with  1
Mb or more.

Triple Yahoo

 Stuart Denman, author of the excellent GIF/JPEG viewer "Speed of
Light", has also produced a game. It is called "Triple Yahoo" and
is  a computer rendition of the perhaps more familiar  dice  game
"Yahtzee".  More  accurately,  it's  a dice  throwing  randomizer
features  with built-in score organizer and hiscore table  saver.
Add  to  this use of digital sound effects (the sound  of  a  die
falling,  "ough" if things go wrong and "YAHOO!" if you throw six
of  a  kind) and a smooth user interface and you have  the  whole
thing properly described.
 The evaluation version has a bad habit of throwing dialog  boxes
at the screen that stay there for something like ten seconds.  If
you're  playing  the game these will drive you up  the  wall,  so
there's another reason to register it as soon as you can (besides
the  fact,  of course,  that shareware programmers now  form  the
heart of our Atari world and should be supported generously).
 Suffice to tell you that I play no game more than "Triple Yahoo"
at the moment.  My hiscore is 2416 I believe and I have to get at
least  2300+ to get in the hiscore list in the first  place,  but
somehow it's fiendishly addictive.  If I estimate I play about 15
games of "Triple Yahoo" per day I am still understating. Check it
out  for  yourself.  It  sucks time and you're  powerless  to  do
anything about it.

Winglord

 Yes, another shareware game. The programmer is Victor Bruhn, the
shareware fee US$ 8 and the game "Winglord".
 Remember  the ancient Atari game "Joust"?  Well,  "Winglord"  is
basically  "Joust"  with  knobs on  but  with  somewhat  inferior
graphics. It runs on any ST, STE, Falcon or TT, though it seems a
bit fast on my Falcon.
 "Winglord" adds to the "Joust" concept a thing such as a 'drone'
(two-player  mode  with  the  second player  done  by  the  CPU),
shooting,  a  good  instruction mode,  a demo mode and a  lot  of
really  nice samples (including the cool guitar solo thingy  from
"Bill  & Ted's" when getting an extra life?).  Don't  expect  the
samples to run on a bog-standard ST because all sound playback is
done through DMA (i.e. Falcon and STE only).
 Player control is a lot more direct than with "Joust", sometimes
probably even too direct.  There are four different enemies  that
get  'smarter' and deadlier as levels increase.  You  can't  kill
each  other  in two-player mode,  which is a  really  nice  thing
because in "Joust" more often than not you ended up killing  each
other and flying at each other's throats.
 Registering  the game will get rid of a constantly  re-appearing
'nag  mode'  alert  box (though it's not as nagging  as  that  in
"Triple Yahoo",  mind you),  it will allow you to go beyond level
19 (which is only possible with 2 CPU players in the demo) and it
will enable you to start at levels other than 1.
 A really nice game,  and even the graphics aren't too bad to  be
slagged off or anything. And at US$ 8 it's certainly affordable. 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.