Skip to main content
© Dave 'Spaz of TLB' Moss

 "Asking  a  working actor what he thinks about critics  is  like
asking as lamp-post how it feels about dogs."
                                 Christopher Hampton (playwright)


            TV AND VIDEO STUFF OBSERVED SUFFICIENTLY
                      by Richard Karsmakers

 Where  would current-day society be without video?  It would  be
playing more games,  probably.  Anyway,  I've spent some time not
playing  games and watching video instead.  Rather  miraculously,
none  of  these viewing sessions were in any way  interrupted  by
Chris "Maggie" Holland's impeccable timing for phone calls.
 My findings,  opinions and various other ramblings may be  found
below.

Beethoven

 A  full-out no-holds-barred family film is "Beethoven",  a  film
about  a  dog and the family in which it lands without  the  main
family member actually consenting.  From beginning to end it's  a
load  of cute dog shots and a heap of clichés I have rarely  seen
before.  Need I say that, in the end, nobody - including that one
family member, the dad - would want to be without the dog?
 Which  does  not  say  it's  bad,  because  actually  it's  very
entertaining,  filled with humour,  a lot of cuteness, and even a
half-satisfying story line.  There's an evil vet who wants to use
poor Beethoven's skull to test dum-dum ammunition on,  and a very
dirty dog that, deep down, is totally friendly and even saves the
day  on several occasions.  Especially the beginning and the  end
are  quite hilarious,  but I would advise you to check  them  out
yourself instead of having the bits spoiled by my incessant  urge
to reveal.
 OK,  it's a load of cliché crap perhaps. But it's well done. And
I for one really enjoyed it.
                                                                8

Duckman

 On  the  contrary to the usual stuff in  this  column,  this  is
actually  a TV series,  a cartoon TV series to be more  specific,
and it's one that I feel each intelligent individual of the world
needs to have checked out.
 "Duckman"  (Private Dick and Family Man) is an American  cartoon
for adults, with an enormous load of subtle as well as not-at-all
subtle  humour.  Drawing techniques are unconventional,  and  the
story lines are sometimes far-fetched but always hard-core.  Some
of the stuff has to be seen to believed; it's difficult that this
load  of inspired crap can come from only a few  persons'  minds.
Voices  are brilliant - most notably the  cool,  collected,  bass
voice  of  Cornfed,  Duckman's  right  hand.  There's  a  lot  of
persiflage,  corniness, and general zaniness. If there is any way
you can get this on your TV,  even if it means buying a satellite
dish, be assured to know it's worth your while. This is mandatory
viewing material!
                                                                9

Passenger 57

 Wesley Snipes,  quite on the contrary to his cryo-preserved  and
artificially enhanced evilness in "Demolition Man",  is  American
all star hero in this sortof "Die Hard" on an aeroplane. Non-stop
action  around a psycho and his rather nasty friends hijacking  a
plane  and  off-duty  Security Officer Wesley  Snipes  having  to
rescue  all  the good ones.  Except for - predictably -  the  one
stunning female among the bad ones,  all of them get  killed.  In
the end even the psycho himself buys it, but not before a handful
of  good guys have been rendered fit to welcome him  to  whatever
afterlife has to offer.
 And it any good?  Well, if you want a film that keeps you on the
edge  of your seat - you never quite know who's going to die  and
who  isn't,  with the exception of Snipes of course -  "Passenger
57" is certainly right for you.  The psycho is definitely one  of
the most deviously evil guys I have ever seen.
 I was almost certain this was the kind of film Chris of "Maggie"
would have built up an uncanny urge to phone me  in.  Thankfully,
he didn't.
                                                                9

Philadelphia Experiment II, The

 An  interesting  thing involving a Stealth type  bomber  somehow
being  transferred  in time to the conclusion of  World  War  II,
changing the outcome of history rather dramatically.
 I haven't seen part 1,  but I assume the protagonist is the same
as  in  the first one,  and again he gets transferred  back  into
another   universe,   where  Hitler  has  won  and   things   are
totalitarianly different.  Quite entertaining and worth the money
spent  renting it (especially because someone else rented it  and
brought  it  by  so  we could watch it  too),  but  not  all  too
memorable.
                                                                7

Repossessed

 What  you get when you cross "Exorcist" with about half a  dozen
films  in  the  genre of "Naked Gun" and  most  National  Lampoon
material  is "Repossessed",  starring Leslie  Nielsen  and,  yes,
original "Exorcist I/II" actress Linda Blair.  Leslie Nielsen  is
the arch-exorcist, incidentally posing on the cover in an on-the-
cross  "Naked Gun" pose,  and Linda Blair plays  an  occasionally
over-the-top parody on the original protagonist.
 As a whole,  the film is very funny though at times it tends  to
drone  on a bit.  There are a few almost obligatory  "Star  Wars"
jokes,   too.   "Repossessed"  breaks  with  quite  a  few   film
conventions,  but is not as brilliant as the "Naked Gun" and  not
as disconcerting as the "Exorcist" trilogies.  Still, quite worth
while renting for a long video night's comic relief.
                                                              7.5

Triumph of the Spirit

 Boring,  boring,  boring.  Willem Dafoe plays a Polish (?) boxer
who gets caught and put in a concentration camp.  Hundreds die in
the gas chamber and he starts to fight to win,  to stay alive and
at  the same time earn the camp commander a lot of  dosh  winning
the  games.   We've  seen  the  whole  theme  before,  and  after
"Schindler's List" it all seems a bit superfluous.
 Er...that Dafoe dude is one ugly mother!
                                                                5

Wayne's World II

 I was going to see this in the cinema but when eventually I came
round  to  going  it turned out to have been  replaced  by  "Cool
Runnings"  that  I went to see instead.  In retrospect  that  was
probably a good thing,  because I doubt I would gladly have spent
a cinema fee to see this load of recycled stuff.
 "Wayne's  World  II" now sees Wayne and Garth trying to  set  up
Waynestock,  instigated by a weird naked native American and  the
ghost  of Jim Morrison.  It's not much of a  story,  really,  and
basically they took some of the funny bits from the original  and
replaced  a few jokes with lesser ones.  Even the  evil  producer
reappears to try and get Tia Carrere (who is nice,  but in no way
like  Kelly Preston whom I have decided is my definite  favourite
woman to roam this mortal plane), and in the end all ends well.
 This  film  is  perhaps  a bit more  worth  while  if  you  like
Aerosmith.  There's a nice amount of funny moments and even a few
interesting  new  gags,  but it's nothing to  really  write  home
about.
                                                              6.5

 As they (and I) have said many times before, that's all. Another
fix if video reviews may be found in the next issue of ST NEWS

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.