Skip to main content
© Bros

 "A hooker is a fisher of men."
                                                    Gordon Bowker


                     SELECTED MUSIC REVIEWS
                      by Richard Karsmakers

 A  somewhat wider range of stuff reviewed this  time,  primarily
because I also get some stuff through "Avalanche" magazine  these
days.  Conveniently  clustered and sorted,  of course,  for  your
ultimate reading enjoyment (well, at least sortof).

EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP-EP

MALMSTEEN, YNGWIE - I CAN'T WAIT (CANYON INTERNATIONAL)

 This  CD single was sent to be by my excellent Japanese pen  pal
Tomoko Murakami,  and highly interesting it is indeed (for  those
among you who like Malmsteen, that is).
 What we get here is a 20+ minute EP featuring 3 non-album tracks
and  2  live tracks taped early 1994 at Budo Kan  (a  performance
that  will  also be released on video throughout the  world  late
January  or  February 1995).  The non-album tracks are  "I  Can't
Wait" (which sounds quite commercial but not too bad for Yngwie),
"Aftermath" (a good song that has a few elements of older  songs,
though)  and  "Power and Glory" (the Takada  wrestler  pump-tune,
before  released in Japan on a separate 3" CD single  with  remix
and "Seventh Sign").  The live tracks are "Rising Force" and "Far
Beyond  the Sun",  which I reckon are both superior  to  previous
live  versions  because of the decent singer (I always  did  hate
Jolanda Turner, also when he was in Rainbow).
 Unfortunately,  both  good singer Mike Vescera and  ace  drummer
Mike Terrana have in the mean time left Malmsteen's band, that is
going  to  enter  the studio in January to start  on  their  next
album.

MY DYING BRIDE - THE STORIES (PEACEVILLE)

 As  it has apparently become increasingly difficult to  get  the
three  currently  released  My Dying  Bride  EPs  -  "Symphonaire
Infernus et Spera Emperium",  "The Thrash of Naked Limbs" and  "I
am  the Bloody Earth" - those awfully nice people  at  Peaceville
have released these three EPs as a box set now.  Some people  may
see  behind this some rather blatant commercial reasons,  and  in
part I agree, but fact is that those who have hitherto not bought
these CD singles can now get them all in one fell swoop. As these
three EPs contain some of the most moody doom metal songs,  there
is no reason why one shouldn't.
 As an added bonus,  the "The Stories" box contains the lyrics to
the  songs on the "Thrash" and "Bloody Earth" EPs that  have  not
had the lyrics released before yet. I find especially the "Thrash
of Naked Limbs" lyrics a true songwriting boon.  This Aaron  dude
surely has a way with words - I want to wear you around my  neck.
This is the stuff that sends tears to my eyes.
 But,  even so, I think you had better pass on this set if you've
got the EPs already.

PHOBIA - RETURN TO DESOLATION (RELAPSE)

 Phobia, formed in 1990 as a result of the breakup of Californian
thrash-grind-punks Apocalypse,  claims to get its influences from
Repulsion,  Discharge and early Napalm Death. One thing is sure -
these  claims  are  quite correct;  some of the  songs  could  be
considered  half-rip-offs even,  especially a song  like  "Hitler
Killa!"  that  could have come straight from  "Scum".  And  maybe
that's  not bad at all,  because I think there's a need for  some
genuine aggression, a voyage back to the hard core of grind.
 With  the help of Fear Factory drummer Raymond  Herrera,  Phobia
have  recorded  an intense couple of songs  that  will  viciously
vibrate   the   becalloused  eardrums  of   the   most   seasoned
thrash/grind fans.
 In early 1995 Phobia will enter the studio for their first  full
length record.

CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD-CD

ANNIHILATOR - KING OF THE KILL (MUSIC FOR NATIONS)

 When  listening to this album for the first  time,  the  initial
track  ("The  Box")  bestowed on me a  fear  that  Annihilator  -
actually just Jeff Waters now,  with session drummer Randy  Black
(and  possibly  even  a  drum computer  at  times?)  -  had  gone
industrial.  Distorted industrial lyrics sung by Waters  himself,
and  a  slower pace like that often found  in  industrial  bands.
However,  after  that all songs are typically  Annihilator  again
with  Waters'  patented quick riffing,  chaotically  fast  guitar
tinklings  and  vocals  that  could  have  come  off  any   early
Annihilator  album.  Though ex-singer Aaron  Randall  contributed
lyrics  here and there,  the whole album - with the exception  of
"The  Box"  - has the typical  Annihilator  (read:  Jeff  Waters)
fingerprint all over it.
 Fans  will like it,  though it is to be doubted whether  there's
anything truly new on the album as such.  Production is good,  as
usual. Lyrics are superficial, as usual. Loads of riffs per song,
as  usual (a few straight off "Set the World on Fire" if you  ask
me).  A few ballads or part-ballads,  as usual. All in all it's a
pretty  "as usual" album,  that will no doubt get some  criticism
due  to lack of innovation even though Jeff does all the  singing
himself  (and not too badly,  either).  Tracks to check out  when
listening in the record shop:  "Second to None" and "Fiasco".  If
you're a sucker for ballads,  go for "In the Blood" (but I  guess
you wouldn't be reading this magazine if you're one of those).
 Jeff Waters is beginning to be a bit like some other  guitarists
I  shan't  mention,  changing band members as often  as  a  dandy
changes his socks.  And I think everybody realises that the times
of "Alice in Hell" will probably never come upon us again. Still,
I'd say that "King of the Kill" is better than "Set the World  on
Fire".
 Sigh...those were the days...

BOLT THROWER - ...FOR VICTORY (EARACHE)

 Bolt  Thrower  is  probably  Earache's  most  "roll  across  the
listeners like a battle tank" band.  On "The IVth Crusade", their
previous  CD,  it was already obvious that they had  found  their
style  which was basically a lot of bass drum with a heavy  chunk
of rhythm guitar thrown atop it, with a second guitar supplying a
heavy chord melody of sorts.  Who would not want to wake up to  a
post-armageddon  world if only it'd have "Spearhead"  playing  on
whatever remains of the earth's radio system?
 Surely not I!
 "...For Victory" is much in the same vein as "The IVth Crusade",
though  I guess many fans will assume it's actually not quite  as
good. If you seek a classic along the lines of "Spearhead" on the
CD you will have sought in vain.  Nonetheless it does offer three
quarters of an hour of really heavy,  thundering metal, the sonic
equivalent of a good root canal treatment. For people who want to
have  whatever substance they have between their ears  resembling
something the cat dragged in, this is one of the best CDs to get.

BROKEN VOWS - THE BOWELS OF REPUGNANCE (MUSIC FOR NATIONS)

 If  there's one thing that I wondered about when I heard  Broken
Hope's "The Bowels of Repugnance", it was how on earth these guys
have  secured  a record deal with Music For  Nations  if  similar
deals for bands like Morta Skuld and Vital Remains seem insecure.
Apart from the fact that you get only slightly more than half  an
hour  of  music,  what you actually  get  is  un-innovative,  un-
inspired and generally not good at all.  When I listened to it, a
quote  of a familiar TV character sprang to mind:  "Stop  in  the
name of all that which does not suck!" ("Huh, huh.")
 The  CD liner contains extensive lyrics,  although it's  totally
impossible to verify what is actually sung. I love grunts and get
off on death metal, but Broken Hope is really absurd. Death metal
isn't  dead as far as I am concerned,  but Broken Hope  certainly
seems a nail to the coffin.

BRUTAL TRUTH - NEED TO CONTROL (EARACHE)

 If there's one band that really lives up to its name - though  I
reckon there are others too - it's Brutal Truth.  With the accent
on  brutal,  this band delivers relentless blow  upon  relentless
blow  to  the listener's poor  eardrums.  It's  fast-paced,  very
aggressive,  quite  extreme,  and freaky almost to the  point  of
insanity.  The  drummer is either possessed by a speed  demon  or
simply very well-coordinated,  though perhaps it's a  combination
of both.  Extreme grind-core is varied with slower passages  that
sometimes  even  tend  to be - perish  the  thought!  -  melodic.
Samples  are thrown in as well to give it a bit extra,  or  maybe
to  give  the  critics  a  chance  to  say  they're   "constantly
evolving"?
 For  people who are out for a dose of  genuine  anger,  hardcore
frustration,  that kind of thing,  they could do a lot worse than
getting "Need to Control".

CONSOLATION - BEAUTYFILTH & NEMBRIONIC HAMMERDEATH - TEMPTER
(DISPLEASED SPLIT CD)


 Never  heard of these bands before,  and within a week I got  in
touch with both their split CD and a gig supporting At The  Gates
in  order to get in gear for the interview to be found  elsewhere
in this issue.
 In  retrospect  it seems weird that these bands had  never  been
heard  of  by  me before.  Both bands  are  quite  alike,  though
personally I think Consolation has an edge over Nembrionic due to
a  more genre-specific vocalist and,  I find  personally,  better
compositions.  Having said that,  both bands have recorded a good
half hour of meticulously performed death/thrash/speed/techno  or
whatever  it is that label-freaks call  it.  It's  well-produced,
well-played,  and  it  just a blast to listen to.  If you  get  a
chance to see these bands (they usually always perform  together,
sharing one guitarist and a drum kit) there is no reason why  you
shouldn't.   Consolation's   "Part-time  God"  and   Nembrionic's
"Towards the Unholy" are some excellent examples of what they can
do.  Go  to your local CD shop and check these  songs  out,  then
decide if you want to buy.

DISRUPT - UNREST (RELAPSE)

 If  you hate McDonald,  seriously contemplate eating  vegetables
only,  love cows,  think the entire world would be better off  if
all  grain  would  be sent to Africa instead of  fed  to  cattle,
love anarchy and hate nazis, this is a CD you'll like. If not for
the  music,  then  at least for the message that is  driven  home
without relent.  A few platitudes and profanities hurled together
with  a  lot of mortar into a wall of sound only  true  grindcore
bands  can  come to grips with.  Three  different  vocalists  are
used,  apparently,  and trust me if I say it's difficult to  hear
which of them is actually the female one.
 Well,  let's  not get too negative here.  Disrupt play a  bucket
full of straight-ahead hardcore with all the stuff you've come to
know  and  love of the genre.  To me personally it sounds  a  bit
same-ish, with some sampled speech included to appear politically
correct.  If these guys truly believe the things they say,  and I
have no reason to believe otherwise, they've got all the blessing
I can bestow on them.  If it's just an image - like Rage  Against
the Machine - then I'd rather give my portion to Fikkie (which is
what  we Dutch tend to say sometimes).  Anarchist  fuck-the-world
bands  are  popping up on every street corner  these  days.  It's
important that the good gets separated from the bad and the ugly.
 If you're going to get this album, by the way, be sure to get it
on CD for there are 10 CD bonus tracks on it.

DREAM THEATER - AWAKE (ATLANTIC)

 People have been classifying this CD as "unbalanced"  sometimes,
and I tend to agree only in part.  "Awake" contains a massive 75+
minutes  of  music,  with most of the songs actually  being  very
good. On the down side there's a rather predictable ballad called
"The Silent Man" (thankfully a short one, actually part of a song
consisting of three segments) and two,  well,  I guess you'd call
them 'power ballads',  called "Innocence faded" and "Caught in  a
Web".  These  two are very melodic and have the potential to  get
radio/MTV  airplay.  There's  also a song  called  "6:00",  which
somehow does not appeal to me very much.  Maybe the rhythm is too
experimental? Anyway, I hate that sample.
 The other tracks,  however,  are the more interesting, where the
individual  musicians  really let loose.  Typical  Dream  Theater
tracks  in  the  classic  sense are "The  Mirror"  and  even  the
somewhat  chaotic  "Erotomania".   I  like  the  11-minute   epos
"Scarred",  too, and the last track, "Space-Dye Vest", is quite a
beautiful  ballad,  written  by now ex-member  Kevin  Moore.  I'm
afraid they'll never play it in concert.
 Ex-member  Moore  is not present as clearly as  on  "Images  and
Words",  with  less virtuoso solo work,  which I  kinda  dislike.
Petrucci seems more present,  which I like.  All in all, however,
"Awake" is a very,  very good album with tremendous growing power
that  certainly  joins the list of some of the best  releases  of
1994.  If you liked "Images and Words", you may not like this one
a lot at start.  But once the growing starts,  you'll find the CD
in your player more often than not. It's a true gem.
 Watch  out:  There's  a CD single of "Lie"  which  features  the
additional  studio track "To Live Forever" and a live version  of
"Another Day". The latter is claimed to be previously unreleased,
though this should read "previously unreleased IN THE UK" for  it
was  features once before already on the "Another Day" CD  single
released (in the USA?) in 1993.

ELEND - LEÇONS DE TÉNEBRES (HOLY RECORDS)

 Elend  is  a challenge to every person - to listen,  to  try  to
interpret, to try to get to fumbly grips with. But for a reviewer
such  as I there is the added difficulty of having to attempt  to
classify it. Among the many different bands from different genres
that  I  thought I could recognise in Elend,  it might  be  worth
while  mentioning  Drug  Free  America,   Montserrat  (yes,   the
"Barcelona" opera singer) and Bel Canto,  with a bit of  Orphaned
Land  thrown  in for good accord as well as a  hypodermic  filled
with aggression and doom.
 Elend   consists  of  two  musicians  who   play   synthesizers,
orchestral keyboards and electric violins, and who both sing. One
of them sings and chants with a 'normal' voice, whereas the other
shouts and grunts. Third, however, there's Eve Gabrielle Siskind,
who  gives  the  music  a mystically  beautiful  touch  with  her
haunting soprano voice.
 If you want to hear distorted guitars you'd better not buy  this
record, nor if you want to hear heavy drums - for there are none.
But this album is probably the singularly most serenely beautiful
release  of the year.  Difficult to listen to if  you're  already
blinded  by today's mass of metal mayhem,  but a  small  treasure
just waiting to be discovered nonetheless.
 And, finally, I have heard a truest voice of the sirens. Finally
I am able to forget the beauty of Sarah Marrion's voice (who sang
on Paradise Lost's "Gothic").  This is stuff to make the soul cry
with happiness, to make the throat clog and constrict.
 Eeriely beautiful.

EPIDEMIC - EXIT PARADISE (METAL BLADE)

 After a few demos and previous CDs, Epidemic have released their
new "Exit Paradise",  of which a promo tape came into the  sweaty
palms  of yours truly.  It's nothing really new,  not  if  you've
heard stuff like Pyogenesis,  Orphaned Land and Overdose  before,
but  it's well-produced and well-played,  with breaks galore  and
nicely putrid death metal vocals, whereas the whole collection of
sounds  together are really very heavy too.  I doubt if  Epidemic
will be the next major success, but you could do a lot worse than
this  album offering 40 minutes of organised  mayhem.  Especially
the  drummer  seems  to  be quite capable  of  what  he's  doing,
changing speed all the time without as much as faltering.

FRIEDMAN, MARTY - INTRODUCTION (ROADRUNNER / SHRAPNEL)

 I had expected Marty Friedman to continue the trend set with the
moody "Scenes" solo album,  and indeed he has.  None of the stuff
he does with Megadeth here,  nor anything remotely like his debut
solo  album  "Dragon's Kiss" or his amazingly  complex  Cacophony
stuff with Jason Becker.  No,  there's plenty of keyboards  (even
plain  piano)  on it,  and "Bittersweet" even has  Shakuhachi  (a
Japanese string (?) instrument), Cello and Violin.
 I  like it.  It's even more  experimental,  less  "metal",  than
"Scenes".  I truly admire Friedman's diversity;  he seems a  very
broadminded musical individual.  Nick "Megadeth" Menza plays  the
drums  again,  and  most tracks are  atmospheric  collections  of
acoustic and electric guitar used interchangably.  And it has  to
be said that he can play acoustic guitar very well.
 With  the Elend release at Holy,  I guess "Introduction" is  the
most  distinctly non-metal release of 1994.  Maybe it would be  a
good thing for some metalheads to check it out.

FUDGE TUNNEL - THE COMPLICATED FUTILITY OF IGNORANCE (EARACHE)

 A  bit  of  a pretentious title for what  is  basically  guitar-
oriented hard rock with a bit of grunge and a bit of grind thrown
in, don't you agree? So let's just forget about the title and the
message it carries, and listen to the music.
 Fudge  Tunnel  is still very much the same as they used  to  be,
though one would tend to think they've grown.  They've absorbed a
bit of industrial,  used some samples,  and have also thrown in a
back-to-the-roots influence such as slow doom - a song like "Find
Your Fortune" could have been done by Cathedral or Black  Sabbath
with  a  different vocalist.  I hadn't heard much  of  this  band
before, but I think they can be described as a rougher version of
the Angels With Dirty Faces.
 The  thing  I dislike most about this album is the  last  track,
some  10+ minutes long of which the first are filled with  utmost
silence.  The musical part is not good at all, either, and anyway
I  thought  the "half empty track" idea was  milked  enough  ever
since Nirvana's "Nevermind" (where I didn't like it either).
 Not bad, all in all, but if you can have a CD player that can be
made to remember to skip a track, make it skip #12.

GENERATION - BRUTAL REALITY (METAL BLADE)
(guest review by Joris van Slageren)

 This  release sees the invention of yet another  musical  genre:
White Industrial.  These three guys among which Trouble guitarist
Bruce  Franklin make industrial metal the  Christian  way.  Could
this  be  true white noise?  According to the rather  vague  and
bombastic   information   that  was  supplied  by   Rough   Trade
"Generation  are  far from simply being a  pale  faced  facsimile
amongst  the current influx of aggra-metal computer-click  cross-
pollinations". Personally I don't know about this, but I like the
music.  Like Ministry and Pitch Shifter their music doesn't stray
too far from more traditional metal to be interesting for  people
who  are into metal music.  The high Christianity content of  the
lyrics is also bearable even for non-christians.  The only  track
in  which religion really shows is the last track on the a  lbum:
Psalm  69.  This is the original psalm read aloud without  music.
Perhaps  they  want to share their views on ways  of  succeeding,
sucking  eggs and everything in reaction to  Ministry's  version.
All  in all it's quite a good album in the musical  neighbourhood
of and about as good as the already mentioned Ministry and  bands
like that.

G.G.F.H. - HALLOWEEN (PEACEVILLE)
(guest review by Joris van Slageren)

 It's  very hard to categorise this record as it has very  little
to  do with ordinary metal music.  It contains tracks from  demos
released from 1986 to 1989. The GGFH-discography contained in the
booklet with the Peaceville volume 4 CD suggests that this  album
was already released in 1991 on cassette only. As a result of the
long  period  of time over which the tracks  have  been  recorded
there  are  many different styles on this  record.  Some  of  the
tracks  are appreciable,  like for example the track called  "She
comes  to you" that contains nice drum computer  percussion.  But
other  tracks seem to have no meaning.  They consist of the  same
not very interesting sounds repeated over and over again. As said
before this album has got little or nothing to with rock or metal
music, so if your taste doesn't exceed the limits of these genres
you should not buy it. Perhaps fans of industrial music will find
something  of interest in this record,  but they as  well  should
listen to it before purchase.

INCANTATION - MORTAL THRONE OF NAZARENE (RELAPSE)

 Jesus H.F.  Christ!  I think I've just discovered the band  that
trendy rebellious twelve-year-olds will want to wear the next  T-
shirts  of...   Anti-religious  fervour,  sex,  blood  and  guts,
ruthless  speed hacking,  fast and fairly complex guitar  antics,
more speed changes than you can shake a Saint Vitus' stick  at...
In other words:  Typically Relapse. Incantation sounds a lot like
Autopsy, actually, though the inside CD artwork is midly shocking
in comparison with that of "Acts of the Unspeakable", of course.
 Not bad,  not bad (he said,  taking the plugs out of his  ears).
But  it  does  make  me wonder what's  going  to  happen  to  the
impressionable  youths  of  today.  A  true  decline  of  western
civilisation?  This  is the kind of CD you'd like to put  in  the
sweaty hands of fundamentally religious nutters,  then count  the
seconds until a cardiac arrest sets in...

MEGADETH - YOUTHANASIA (CAPITOL)

 A  very tempting CD to buy because it looks extremely  slick  in
design  with a rather excellent booklet (showing Dave Junior  has
turned into a pretty girl) and,  in the case of a limited  number
of copies,  a free T-shirt (!).  Musically, however, the CD is no
longer state-of-the-art thrash/speed metal.  Megadeth have gone a
bit  soft,  and even seem to renounce their previous  efforts  by
including a closing song called "Victory" in which, basically, as
many  of  their  old song titles are  mentioned  in  a  decidedly
negative context.
 Is it a bad CD? No. But the people who liked early Megadeth will
probably think it's not even close to "aggressive".  It's getting
to be a 'hard rock band',  not even heavy metal,  continueing the
line  of "Countdown to Extinction" that was already quite  a  bit
'softer'  than their excellent "Rust in Piece".  There  are  some
thoroughly OK tracks on this album - my personal favourite  being
"Reckoning  Day"  -  but  also a few rather  weak  ones  such  as
"Victory". And I think it's a bit of a shame that Marty Friedman,
an  excellent guitarist,  is usually heard only with  short  solo
efforts in a few breaks and bridges.
 Had it not been for the fact that a friend of mine (hi  Thomas!)
had bought the CD without T-shirt and two days later bought a  CD
with T-shirt,  causing him to sell one of the CDs for half price,
I would probably have preferred to wait some time until it was  a
bit cheaper.

MERCYFUL FATE - TIME (METAL BLADE)

 At first I didn't like this CD too much,  but on the contrary to
some other Mercyful Fate albums it can grow quite a bit on you so
actually  I'd now go as far as saying it's about as good  as  "In
the  Shadows" (without original drummer Kim Ruzz,  Mercyful  Fate
will never quite be as good as they used to be in the olden days,
even though their production wasn't all too brill back then),  or
possibly a bit better.  There is actually not one song on it that
I  don't like,  although "The Afterlife" is a bit too softish  at
times, with King Diamond actually singing in a high voice instead
of screaming.  "Time",  the title piece,  is also a bit weird - I
think it's about time and the fact that it kills - but I like the
way King's voice has been overdubbed zillions of times so that it
sounds as if you're listening to an entire Diamond  Choir.  There
aren't  many  vocalists who can get away  with  this  overdubbing
business,  but  King Diamond is one (together with Dawn "Fear  of
God" Crosby, of course).
 "Time" is, in many ways, an instantly recognisable Mercyful Fate
album  -  and not just because of the  vocals.  Compositions  are
good,  vocal melody not innovative but good anyway, and there are
once  more some classic tracks in the shape of "Nightmare be  thy
Name",   "Angel   of  Light"  (with  unparalelled  King   Diamond
screaming, awesome!!) and "The Mad Arab".
 People  who  liked "In the Shadows"  will  like  this,  too,  if
perhaps not at the first or second listen.

OBITUARY - WORLD DEMISE (ROADRUNNER)

 Finally, a lot too late (though not quite as late as the review)
but well worth the wait, upon me has revealed itself the occasion
to acquire Obituary's "World Demise",  their fourth and certainly
most experimental full-length album.  Those who didn't like  "The
End Complete" probably won't dig "World Demise" either, but those
who did,  will.  The songs are very much in the same vein with  a
virtually  identical  production that makes the  style  instantly
recognizable.  However, some of the songs have had samples added,
and effectively too I might add. The title track and "Splattered"
use  these the most,  and it really enriches the Obituary  sound.
Unfortunately  I suppose many hard-core Obituary fans won't  like
it.  To hell with them (which is probably where they'd prefer  to
be  anyway),  because Obituary has grown  and  experimented.  The
final  song,  "Kill  For  Me",  even has  the  last  two  minutes
comprising  solely of African American music.  I don't like  that
bit particularly, but at least it shows these guys have guts.
 "World Demise" is not an absolute corker of an album,  but  it's
pretty damn good anyway, especially when you turn up the volume a
lot.
 Try  to look out for the American CD single "Don't  Care";  it's
got a good non-album track called "Killing Victims  Found".  This
can also be found on the limited edition "World Demise" digipack.

ORPHANED LAND - SAHARA (HOLY RECORDS)

 Holy Records have recently signed up Israeli band Orphaned Land.
Their  debut CD is called "Sahara" and might very well be one  of
the most innovative products to come out of the metal  scene.  As
far as I know,  Orphaned Land are the first band top  extensively
use  Arabian chord progressions and Eastern  musical  instruments
such as Tarbuka and Hud amidst distorted guitars.  The product of
a  war  generation,  topics  of their  songs  range  from  Jewish
religion to the Gulf War.  Kobi Farhi's vocals can be compared to
those of My Dying Bride's Aaron,  meaning they vary from a  grunt
to plain singing that fits the songs eeriely.  A female singer is
present on many songs,  though I have to say her voice is perhaps
too  sweet for them (quite on the contrary to the  female  vocals
in,  say,  Excision and Paradise Lost).  The song where her voice
fits  best  is the song you should never have to listen  to  when
you're  having  love problems;  the  beautifully  exquisite  "The
Beloved's Cry".
 "Sahara" is,  very much like Septic Flesh' debut,  a technically
excellent album that also offers incredible songwriting and a lot
of innovation. Those of you who aren't yet confined to the narrow
limits of today's standard genres might do well to broaden  their
horizons by giving this band a good listen.
 Someone  at Holy Records is precisely "in sync"  with  me,  I've
discovered. Excellent.
 Check out the Orphaned Land interview,  elsewhere in this  issue
of ST NEWS.

OVERDOSE - PROGRESS OF DECADENCE (MUSIC FOR NATIONS)

 Finally an other band to "make" it outside Brazil. Sounding like
a successful cross between Pantera (production and general sound)
and  Sepultura  (vocals  and some  sound  ingredients  as  well),
Overdose  add  to  the  existing gamut  the  use  of  traditional
Brazilian   percussion   instruments.   Although  some   of   the
instrumental  interludes  are  rendered  same-ish  because  of  a
similar  percussional  approach,  the album as a  whole  has  the
straight-in-the-face quality I really appreciate.
 I guess only time will tell if this band really breaks  through.
They've  got  enthusiasm  and  an  interesting  edge  with  these
Brazilian instruments, but so far it seems not to make the impact
of,  say,  "Beneath the Remains".  Go to a record shop, play song
number 5 ("Capitalist Way") and listen to see if you like it.

PENTAGRAM - BE FOREWARNED (PEACEVILLE)

 After  what  seems like decades,  Pentagram is back with  a  new
album. One of their members, Victor Griffin, has in the mean time
done  some  really groovy things with Cathedral and  I  think  it
shows  in  the overall Pentagram style now.  As opposed  to  both
earlier albums,  re-released last year by Peaceville,  production
is now quite excellent.
 Pentagram  is basically a modern Black  Sabbath,  with  somewhat
weak vocals not dissimilar from Ozzy's.  It's something you  have
to get used to,  but it's not an impossible task at all.  Most of
the  songs  on  this  CD could have  been  classic  Iommi  stuff,
although  I would hasten to add that they don't sound ripped  off
or anything. It's heavy, chunky, semi-slow, rock-solid stuff that
no doom metal fan or early Black Sabbath worshipper will dislike.
I found especially the instrumental passages - bridges and breaks
between vocals - uncannily heavy, where bass is pumped up because
there's  no  vocals it could  repress.  Some  unusual  percussion
instrument  are thrown in,  as well as one song  boasting  female
vocals.
 And  a good thing is that the album now lasts a whole  hour,  of
which actually only a few minutes are less impressive in the form
of an instrumental song called "A Timeless Heart".
 Like the Black Sabbath Tribute Album "Nativity in  Black",  this
is something no Black Sabbath or Cathedral fan should be without.
"Be Forewarned" is a very good album,  especially for people  who
are into classic hard rock.

PITCH SHIFTER - THE REMIX WAR (EARACHE)
(a guest review by Joris van Slageren)

 The  idea of  having somebody else do a remix of one or more  of
your  tracks and releasing that is in itself not  new.  Recently,
for  example,  Morbid Angel released their "Laibach Remixes  EP",
also on Earache Records. The new aspect however is that this time
it's a war.  In one corner of the imaginary boxing ring are Pitch
Shifter  themselves  and  in  the  other  corner  are  Biohazard,
Therapy?  and  Gunshot.  Pitch Shifter are of course an  upcoming
band  with  some  very famous fans like  Pantera's  Phil  Anselmo
already. Of the other three bands the first two are among the top
bands in their respective genres. The third band, Gunshot, is not
so well known, at least not to me. These same three bands each do
a  cover  version of a Pitch Shifter track (the tracks  are  more
like  cover  versions than remixes,  I think) and  Pitch  Shifter
supplies the original versions as well as two other tracks.
 All in all this promises to be interesting.  But after listening
to the advance tape a couple of times,  I reached the  conclusion
that  the result of the war is a 3-0 victory for  Pitch  Shifter.
The  other  bands try to mix their own styles  with  the  orginal
samples and,  somehow,  in the process a lot of the aggression is
lost.  It's not that the cover versions are really bad (with  the
possible  exception  of the Gunshot track),  it's just  that  the
originals are better.
 So,  unless  you are a very big fan of one of the bands and  you
want to buy everything that's remotely related to your  favourite
band, there's really no need to buy this record, in my opinion.

QUEENSRYCHE - PROMISED LAND (EMI)

 I've  listened to this CD quite a lot,  and still I  don't  know
what to think of it.  Is it better than Dream Theater's  "Awake",
or  not?  At start I tended to think the previous.  The songs  on
"Promised Land" are quite instantly likeable,  especially a  song
like "I Am I" and my favourite track,  "Damaged".  It didn't grow
on me as much as did "Operation Mindcrime",  and perhaps I'd just
have to see them perform some of the songs live in order to truly
learn to appreciate this CD,  much in the way that happened  with
"Empire".
 It's better than "Empire",  I think everybody will agree, though
to  me  the almost over-the-top guitar textures present  in  many
songs  get  across a bit  contrived.  Where  Dream  Theater,  for
example,  seems a dazzling sequence of improvisation and  musical
showmanship  moulded  into really  excellent  songs,  Queensryche
seems to take a much more deliberate approach.
 It is said this album is more "ethereal", but I'm not sure about
that. It's a good album with good songs - the title track is also
a  good  one,  I'd like to mention - and I guess  it's  typically
Queensryche.  Fans will no doubt like it a lot, like I do, but if
ever you want to get someone to check out Queensryche I think  it
would  still  be  best to let them  listen  first  to  "Operation
Mindcrime".

SLAYER - DIVINE INTERVENTION (AMERICAN RECORDINGS)

 Well,  Slayer  have  finally released a new studio  album  after
1990's "Seasons in the Abyss" and their excellent double live  CD
"Decade of Aggression". Well, I can be really short about this CD
(much like the CD itself,  which lasts a meagre 37 minutes): It's
typically and instantly recognizable,  and quite excellent.  Some
people might blame them for not being the epitome of  innovation,
but who cares?  Tom Araya screams his head off,  the guitar solos
are still lightning fast with blatant disregard of musical  keys,
and  only  the drums are different and a lot  more  freaky  (Dave
Lombardo has been replaced some time ago by Paul Bostaph who  has
a better double bass drum technique I think).
 Slayer  fans  won't be disappointed except for the  CD's  length
(or, rather, lack of it).

SOLITUDE AETURNUS - THROUGH THE DARKEST HOUR (BULLET PROOF)

 This is Solitude Aeturnus' third album, after two earlier albums
released  on  Roadrunner.  Although the album's  got  its  better
moments - like the nicely chunky,  riff-packed "Pain" - it's also
got its weaker parts.  The half-ballad "Shattered My Spirit" fits
in this latter category. Basically, "Through the Darkest Hour" is
about  an  hour  of well-produced music  slightly  in  the  Black
Sabbath vein but a bit faster and more complex.  It's not bad  at
all,  really,  but there's not enough to make it stand out a lot.
Unless you count the non-grunt vocals of Robert Lowe.

VAI, STEVE - AS 15/2 (MINOTAURO RECORDS)

 One  of  the most exciting bootlegs to come to my  attention  in
quite a while is the double bootleg CD "As 15/2" by Vai, recorded
November last year in Milan,  Italy. Featuring a complete concert
(2  hours' worth) and sufficient sound quality with  good  guitar
sound, it's an absolute must for the guitar fans among you.
 I  only borrowed this CD for a few days as I  couldn't  actually
get  hold of it myself,  so I haven't got a clue as to what  it's
supposed  to cost.  Apart from such classics as "For The Love  of
God"  and "The Animal" the CD offers a lot of material  from  the
new album.  With the guitars sounding louder and vocalist Devin's
voice mixed softer,  the live tracks sound better than the studio
stuff  actually.  Especially "Touching Tongues" is a  masterpiece
that I would not have expected Vai to be able to do  live.  Other
mandatory tracks on this CD are "I Would Love To",  "Greasy Kid's
Stuff", "Junkie", "Sisters" and a >9 minute version of "Answers".
The only thing I missed was "The Audience is Listening", and "For
the Love of God" is definitely inferior to the performance at the
1991 Sevilla gig.  Other than that (and the bad availability  due
to  it being a bootleg) there's no reason why any Vai/guitar  fan
should be without it.

VARIOUS ARTISTS - EARPLUGGED (EARACHE SAMPLER)

 If  you  haven't  got  two of the  CDs  among  Cathedral's  "The
Ethereal Mirror",  Napalm Death's "Fear Emptiness Despair",  Bolt
Thrower's "...Into Victory", Brutal Truth's "Need to Control" and
Entombed's "Wolverine Blues", the "Earplugged" Earache sampler is
the  CD  to get in order to get a taste for the  ones  you  don't
have.  At the price of a CD single you get almost an hour of this
stuff,   immediately   making  it  loads  better  than  the   old
"Grindcrusher" Earache sampler of which,  let's face it, half was
crap.
 Issasimple:  Get this CD unless you haven't got all the separate
CDs already. Its price is certainly not at all prohibitive.

VARIOUS ARTISTS - IN THE NAME OF SATAN (A TRIBUTE TO VENOM)  (GUN
RECORDS)


 My  feelings about this effort are mixed entirely.  Thank god  I
got the digipack with two bonus tracks for otherwise I would have
the added discontent of a rather short CD.
 Anyway,  the best way to look at this "all kinds of famous and a
few  rather  not-so-famous-at-all  bands  doing  a  Venom   song"
compilation is to mention them one by one.
 KREATOR  - WITCHING HOUR:  A decent version of the  song,  nice,
fast,  compact,  though with Mille's predictable rather unmelodic
vocals.
 ANATHEMA - WELCOME TO HELL:  Definitely one of the best songs on
the album - mean,  heavy,  low,  dirty,  with Darren's inimitable
grunt. Well-produced, too.
 VOI-VOD - IN LEAGUE WITH SATAN: I don't like the voice much, but
the  song  itself is OK I guess.  Nothing much more needs  to  be
said.
 NUCLEAR ASSAULT - DIE HARD: Well this is hardly Nuclear Assault,
just Jason Connely basically, and the vocals of this are so awful
that  they  quite  literally  spoil  the  whole  song,   probably
classifying  it as the worst track on the album.  This  is  rape,
really, though the guitars sounds good.
 SKYCLAD  -  PRIME  EVIL:  Another excellent version  of  one  of
Venom's lesser songs (i.e.  one composed without Cronos). Skyclad
add  the violin and excellent production,  which basically  means
this version is lots better than the original!
 SODOM  - 1000 DAYS IN SODOM:  A good song,  nothing much  to  be
said about really. I had expected "Angeldust" on this compilation
because they'd done that on their recent album,  too, but I guess
this track is a lot more logical a choice.  The ending could have
been better, though; it just fades away now.
 EX-CANDLEMASS - COUNTESS BATHORY:  Much like "Die Hard", this is
a  good track as far as the instruments are  concerned,  but  the
vocals  are  once more rather bad - thought not quite as  bad  as
those  of the other track.  I think the main problem is that  the
singer  does  voice trembling (or whatcha may call it)  which  is
something the original, Cronos, would never have done.
 PARADISE  LOST - IN NOMINE SATANAS:  There are three  tracks  on
this album that I think are totally brilliant; Skyclad, Anathema,
and  Paradise  Lost.  Nick  Holmes is  definitely  not  a  devout
Christian,  let me tell you that. The original was cool, and this
version is,  too. I can imagine this track turning impressionable
and  rebellious  youths into Satanists,  out  to  burn  churches,
decapitate  priests  and drink virgin's blood  from  pentagrammed
chalices.
 FORBIDDEN - RIP RIDE (bonus track):  A fairly good  track,  with
guitar  solo  work that is actually better than  the  original  I
guess,  and  somewhat different drums arrangement here and  there
that doesn't necessarily obliterate the original too much. Nicely
aggressive.
 KILLERS - BLACK METAL (bonus track):  This starts off every  bit
as impressive as the original,  but soon the drums fall  in,  the
snare  produced to sound like a trash bucket  or  something.  The
vocals  are  a bit off (including a bit of a  tremble).  Is  that
really Paul Di'Anno?
 VENOM  - WARHEAD:  Venom have changed musical styles more  often
than a dandy changes his socks.  Now they've gone industrial, and
on  the  contrary  to  the journalist they  hired  to  write  the
arrogantly  ego-boosting  sleeve story,  I don't  think  it's  an
improvement  nor any form of maturing process.  Listen to it  and
see what horrible things can be done to a True Classic Song.  One
day  before  I got the CD I taught myself to play  this  song  on
guitar.  Let me tell you,  I am not a good guitar player but even
my  version is better,  something the people with whom I share  a
house will be happy to attest.
 VENOM  -  HOLY MAN:  For God's sake,  not a  new  song,  please!
Industrial,  too,  and quite simple from a musical point of view,
too. You'd better give this one a miss, too.
 Concluding?  Wait  until this CD is available for half-price  or
something,  because you can't expect to pay full price for the  3
excellent  songs and very small handful of songs that are  OK.  I
guess this might have been the final nail to Venom's coffin. It's
easy to imagine ex-member Cronos sitting somewhere, grinning.

VARIOUS ARTISTS - NATIVITY IN BLACK (A TRIBUTE TO BLACK  SABBATH)
(CONCRETE/COLUMBIA/SONY)


 If only 'they' had been able to get artists as excellent as  the
ones on this CD for the Venom effort..."Nativity in Black" is  an
album the way tribute albums should be,  everything "In the  Name
of  Satan"  failed to be.  Where "In the Name..." had  some  good
bands and a lot of crap,  "Nativity..." has some crap bands and a
lot of good stuff.
 I am not going to spend a lot of words on this.  Suffice to  say
that  there  are  13 songs performed by  people  like  Biohazard,
Megadeth,   Faith  No  More,   Type-O-Negative,   Cathedral   and
Sepultura.  All  tracks  are excellent with the  exception  of  a
slightly mediocre "Iron Man" (by Therapy?  with the real Ozzy  on
vocals) and "Lord of this World" (by Corrosion of Conformity) and
a really, really lousy "Supernaut" by the industrial outfit 1,000
Homo DJ's (sic).  All original Sabbath members play on the album,
with the exception of Tony Iommi, unfortunately.
 This is easily the best tribute album I've ever heard. And at 72
minutes' playing time, it's really good value for money too!

VARIOUS ARTISTS - PROMOTERS OF THE THIRD WORLD WAR (A TRIBUTE  TO
VENOM) (P.A. RECORDS)


 Yes!  Arch  metal heroes Venom even got a second  tribute  album
eventually,  this  time filled with 15 songs performed  by  bands
nobody outside of Sweden will ever have heard of.  Which  doesn't
make  it any worse than the original,  and indeed it  isn't.  The
songs - classics like "Black Metal",  "Leave me in Hell", "Buried
Alive",  "7 Gates of Hell",  "In League with  Satan",   "Teachers
Pet",  "Welcome to Hell", "Stand Up and be Counted" and "Countess
Bathory" - are virtually all played in ruthlessly heavy  versions
in  a distinctly blackened death metal vein.  No  'real'  singers
here, no industrial bullshit. No, this is the real thing, and I'd
advise anyone to get this one if you had to chose. There's even a
Venom song I had never before heard of - "Senile Decay".
 Of  course,  this album also has a few  rotten  apples.  Pingo's
Inferno,  for  example,  plays a version of "Live Like an  Angel"
that  is  barely recognizable - these guys  are  too  technically
capable  and have unwittingly ruined the original with their  new
arrangement  including keyboards of all things.  And Shit Out  Of
Luck's  version of "Poison" is quite bad,  too,  with  rearranged
vocals and an appropriately shit production.  Last but not  least
there's  Kosken  Hardcore's version of "Angeldust"  which  sounds
uninspired and isn't even identical.
 Nonetheless a really heavy, brilliant cover album!

VARIOUS ARTISTS - SMOKE ON THE WATER (A TRIBUTE) (SHRAPNEL)

 I  guess  1994  will enter music history as  "the  year  of  the
tribute  album".  It started off with the Kiss tribute  "Kiss  My
Ass" and there have been many others including the ones mentioned
above.  I  am  not sure if it was a bad thing or  a  good  thing.
Anyway, I got my share of it and I'll play them regularly because
some of the cover versions are better than the originals!
 This  particular tribute album is more of a "guitar hero"  album
than  a  true tribute,  what with guitarists the  likes  of  John
Norum,  Yngwie  Malmsteen,  Vinnie  Moore,  Richie  Kotzen,  Paul
Gilbert  and  Tony MacAlpine taking care  of  those  honours.  So
instrumentally  everything  is  hunky-dory,   also  because   all
drumming  is  done by Deen Castronovo and all keyboards  by  Jens
Johansson. I don't agree with some of the vocalists on the album,
but  some  of them are really good - such as  Richie  Kotzen  and
Glenn Hughes (yeah!).
 Songs covered on the album include classics the likes of  "Speed
King", "Space Truckin'", "Lazy", "Smoke on the Water", "Fireball"
and "Maybe I'm a Leo" as well as "Woman from Tokyo" and a further
3 songs.
 No  extensive  "Deep Purple worshipping" notes on the  CD  liner
notes this time, which might be just as well.
 And  who  wins the guitar war?  Listen to  it  yourself  without
checking  who the guitarists are first,  and I think  you'll  see
it's  Yngwie Malmsteen.  Russ Parrish does a good job at all  the
rhythm guitar work and some of the solos.

1994 CD RELEASES TOP 10

 I'm not sure if anyone's waiting for this, but what the heck. If
people  like  ST  NEWS  and the musical  taste  portrayed  in  it
(especially mine,  that is),  they would perhaps do well to check
out  some  of  the following CDs which I reckon  are  the  finest
releases of 1994 (in order of superbity).

 1   Septic Flesh - "Mystic Places of Dawn"
 2   Dream Theater - "Awake"
 3   Queensrÿche - "Promised Land"
 4   At The Gates - "Terminal Spirit Disease"
 5   Nightfall - "Macabre Sunsets"
 6   Mercyful Fate - "Time".
 7   Orphaned Land - "Sahara"
 8   Napalm Death - "Fear Emptiness Despair"
 9   Obituary - "World Demise"
10   Altar - "Youth Against Christ"

 Special runner-up: Yngwie Malmsteen - "Seventh Sign".

THE "BLADE RUNNER" THING SORTED OUT

 Some of you may be aware that Vangelis' "Blade Runner", probably
one of the very finest soundtracks ever released, is available in
two  versions.  One is the bootleg version,  reviewed in ST  NEWS
Volume  9  Issue  1  I  believe  (OWM-9301).  The  other  is  the
"official" release,  reviewed in ST NEWS Volume 9 Issue 2 I  seem
to recall.
 Here's a list of the differences on the CD, for those of you who
want  to  have both or don't yet know which one  should  be  had.
Needless  to  say,  this  info came from  the  Vangelis  "Direct"
digest on the net.

 Cues On Both [* == previously released on Vangelis'  compilation
Themes]
-----------------------------------------------------------------

OWM-9301                           1994 "Official" Release
-----------------------------------------------------------------
  4:03  Main Titles + Prologue     1:12  [part of] Main Title [1]
  1:46  L.A. Nov. 2019             1:18  [part of] Main Title [1]
  5:39  Memories Of Green *        5:05  Memories Of Green [2] *
 10:19  Blade Runner Blues         8:54  Blade Runner Blues [3]
  5:30  On The Trail Of Nexus 6 == 4:47  Tales Of The Future
  4:57  Love Theme *               4:57  Love Theme *
  2:41  Tears In Rain              3:02  Tears In Rain [has
                                                        dialogue]
  7:24  End Titles [4] *           4:37  End Titles *
  3:59  One More Kiss, Dear        3:59  One More Kiss, Dear
[46:18]                          [37:51]

Tracks Exclusive To OWM-9301
----------------------------
  0:24  Ladd Company Logo [5]
  1:29  Deckard Meets Rachel
  2:05  Bicycle Riders (Gail Laughton) [6]
  1:12  Deckard's Dream [7]
  3:03  If I Didn't Care (Ink Spots) [8]
  3:35  The Prodigal Son Brings Death
  1:02  Dangerous Days
 10:58  Wounded Animals
  1:39  Trailer/Alternate Main Title [9]
[25:27]

Tracks Exclusive To 1994 "Official" Release [10]
------------------------------------------------
  5:46  Blush Response [opens with 1:38 dialogue]
  5:27  Wait For Me
  4:47  Rachel's Song
  2:33  Damask Rose
[18:33]

Footnotes
---------
[1]  "Main Title" on "official" release is 3:41 and contains 1:07
     dialogue, plus the two excerpts as noted.
[2]  "Memories of Green" on "official" release fades earlier than
     other versions.
[3]  "Blade  Runner  Blues"  fades  about  1:30  earlier  on  the
     "official" release than on OWM-9301.
[4]  "End  Titles"  on OWM-9301 are full-length  version  of  the
     original cue; other versions are edited.
[5]  The Ladd Company Theme was composed by John Williams.
[6]  The "Bicycle Riders" cue is from Gail Laughton's album Harps
     Of The Ancient Temples.
[7]  "Deckard's  Dream" on OWM-9301 is lifted from the  video  of
     the Director's Cut.
[8]  The Ink Spots' "If I Didn't Care" was used in early cuts  of
     the film,  but was replaced by the Vangelis-penned "One More
     Kiss, Dear" for the film's release.
[9]  The  "Trailer/Alternate  Main Title" is the audio  from  the
     original  theatrical  trailer,  and contains temp  music  by
     Robert Randles.
[10] All  tracks  exclusive to the 1994 "Official"  release  were
     composed by Vangelis while he prepared the film's score, but
     were not used in any released version of the movie.

 More in a future issue of ST NEWS, most likely (indeed) Volume
10 Issue 1! 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.