Skip to main content
© Share And Enjoy

                             PART I
                 THE ULTIMATE VIRUS KILLER BOOK


             3 - GENERAL HISTORY OF COMPUTER VIRUSES

 In  1957,  N.T.J.  Baily wrote a book called  "The  Mathematical
Theory  of  Epidemics".  It mentioned  theories  behind  computer
viruses,  but  did  not  result in any  of  them  actually  being
released. This is now commonly regarded to be the first book ever
published related to the subject of computer viruses, or at least
the  basic principles behind them.  In 1974,  Gunn wrote "Use  of
Virus Functions",  which was already a lot more explicit. It took
up  to  1980 before a German professor called J.  Krause  was  to
publish  a  book  that even went as far  as  featuring  practical
examples of virus programming.

 During  the last decade or so,  many things have  happened  with
various kinds of computer viruses and related anomalies.  In this
chapter,  you  will  find short stories of  various  'historical'
events  that have happened.  Mind you,  some of them  are  rather
spectacular.

 3.1      THE BIG STUFF

 The  first actual viruses (or associated anomalies) appeared  on
large  networks and mainframe systems,  which were at  that  time
mainly  used  by Universities and various  official  institutions
such as NASA and the CIA.  Most of the time they appeared in  the
form of Trojan horses;  a funny game,  for example,  that cleared
vital parts of the hard disk during play.

 In the early eighties, around the time when Fred Cohen published
his book "Computer Viruses: Theory and Experiments", he conducted
a lot of practical research,  pioneer work on the field of  virus
programming as it were.
 On September 10th 1983,  he infected the VAX 11/750 running UNIX
at  the University of California,  and within a typical  time  of
thirty minutes all programs were infected.  The average infection
time  was 500 milliseconds.  This resulted in him getting  kicked
off the network,  until he was allowed to do further  experiments
in 1984.

 In 1986,  a Trojan Horse ended up in the EDV installation of the
United States Nuclear Physics Research Centre Fermilab. A similar
program  was  further found in 138 VAX systems in  the  worldwide
Space  Physics  Analyst Network (SPAN) in  1987.  German  hackers
appeared to have written this virus, which was designed primarily
to   keep  open  as  many  terminals  as  possible  for   further
contact from Germany.
 Shortly  before  Christmas of that year,  the  highly  notorious
Christmas Virus popped up on VM/CMS machines,  written by  people
at  the  Clausthal  Technical University  in  Germany  using  the
operating  language REXX.  It had spread through  the  scientific
network "EARN Bitnet",  which at the time had approximately  4000
connections.  The  virus locked up the connection because of  its
vicious spreading,  and partly jammed the IBM Company Network  on
December 11th of that year.
 Actually,  the Christmas Virus was a "chain letter",  which read
communication  partner addresses from the NAMES and NETLOG  files
of  the  system it had just infected,  and  then  computer-mailed
itself to all those addresses where it would start doing the same
(thus  creating  what is known to virus specialists  as  a  'tree
structure', ho-hum). "Just type XMas" would appear on the screen.
People that did not follow this request were denied access to the
network for several days.
 To  give  you  an idea of the speed  at  which  it  spread,  the
following table is supplied:

-----------------------------------------------------------------
       Time      Location of network connection
-----------------------------------------------------------------

       12:43     University of Houston
       12:44     Utah State University
       12:44     Catholic University of Nijmegen, Netherlands
       12:44     University of Southern California
       12:44     National University of Singapore
       12:45     City University of New York
       12:45     Monterey Institute of Technology
       12:46     Technical University Twente, Netherlands
       12:46     Technical University Denmark
       12:46     Weizmann Institute of Israel
       12:46     Southwest Missouri State University
       12:47     Louisiana State University Computer Center

-----------------------------------------------------------------

  Infection times with the Christmas Virus on various locations

 Also  in  December of that year,  a virus penetrated  the  major
processing centre of IBM in Tampa,  Florida. This virus was aimed
at  excluding  all  users,  working  itself  slowly  up  even  to
excluding the system manager. Just in time, this program could be
stopped from reaching its vile goal.

 In 1988,  23 year old Robert Tappan Morris of Cornell University
wrote  the  RTM Virus.  Within a matter  of  hours,  it  infected
thousands of computers of universities and research  institutions
through the "Arpanet" and "Milnet" networks. Some of the infected
computers included those of the U.S.  Defence Secretary,  the SDI
laboratories of Livermore in California, the Lincoln laboratories
of  Hanscom  Air  Force Base in Massachusetts and  a  Centre  for
Nuclear Research in Los Alamos,  New Mexico.  The virus caused 96
million  dollars  worth of damage,  which caused the  FBI  to  be
activated promptly.
 At a top secret meeting where, among others, members of the FBI,
NASA, CIA, Air Force Officers and a whole gathering of University
professors  attended,   the  foundation  of  a  Centre  for   the
collection  and annihilation of computer viruses  was  discussed,
all  triggered by the news about this latest virus and  the  harm
that  computer  viruses  would thus  potentially  be  capable  of
inflicting.
 Later,  it turned out that the virus had been a 'harmless'  one,
which  Morris had spread at the occasion of a new IBM 3090-600  E
super computer being installed at Cornell.

 Virus  history is written as we speak.  Even as recently  as  in
1992, the United States employed computer viruses in the Gulf War
- they were used to infect the Iraqi computer air defence system.

 3.2      MS-DOS VIRUSES

 So far the stories about computer viruses on big systems,  which
are really quite a distance away from the everyday computer  user
and which might just as well have been taken from the scripts  of
any "War Games" type film.
 The next logical step down the ladder towards machines that  'us
lower  mortals'  can afford is talking about  viruses  on  MS-DOS
computers. Writers of TV documentaries on viruses have been known
to  estimate that an effective virus may cause damage to as  much
as one million personal computers world wide.

-----------------------------------------------------------------
           Date            Estimated number of viruses
-----------------------------------------------------------------

           1987                 1
           1988                 5
           1989                10
           1990                60
           1991               400
           1995             5,500

-----------------------------------------------------------------

             Approximate virus quantities on MS-DOS

 Just like Atari viruses, MS-DOS viruses usually patch themselves
onto some kind of system vector. Of course, MS-DOS computers have
totally  different system vectors than TOS computers,  that  will
not be explained here. But the basic principle is still the same:
They still patch onto the system vectors pointing to sub-programs
within   the  Operating  System  to  access  disk  sectors   (for
bootsector  viruses)  or to open/close/move/whatever  files  (for
link viruses).

 There are thousands of viruses around in the MS-DOS world.  Some
recent  claims  don't stop until beyond a rather  massive  5,500,
some  of which have interesting names like  Perfume  Virus,  XA-1
Virus
,  AIDS.EXE  Virus,  Dark  Avenger Virus and  December  24th
Virus
.
 It is impossible to talk about all MS-DOS viruses here, as there
are  far too many and this is,  after all,  a book  aimed  rather
explicitly at TOS computer users. Therefore, we will have a go at
describing some of the more 'famous' or remarkable ones.

 3.2.1    THE ISRAEL VIRUS

 One of the most well known viruses on MS-DOS machines,  to  make
it into the newspapers more than once,  is the Israel Virus, also
known  under its pseudonyms of PLO Virus,  Jerusalem A  Virus  or
Friday 13th Virus.
 Extensive studies have been made about this phenomenon,  and  it
is  now believed that a whole family tree of viruses can be  made
with the Israel Virus #1 as pre-virus.
 It  was  first officially noticed by the  Hebrew  University  of
Jerusalem  in  January 1988,  and the discovery was due  to  what
probably was a bug in the virus program. The bug consisted of the
fact  that it would repeatedly infect PC files of the  .EXE  type
(each  time adding about 1,800 bytes file  length),  which  would
then at a certain time grow too big for their storage medium.  PC
files of the .COM type were not repeatedly infected.
 According to K.  Brunnstein's "Computerviren Report", the actual
thing  the  virus was supposed to do was to  slow  down  infected
systems  through  a timer interrupt,  resulting in  the  programs
running at one fifth of their original  speed.  Additionally,  on
the first upcoming Friday the 13th it would destroy all  .COM-and
.EXE  files.  The first Friday the 13th after the discovery  date
was May 13th 1988 - the 40th anniversary of the PLO. Hence one of
its pseudonyms.
 These facts were hyped to considerable height in the press,  and
it  was often - wrongfully - stated that the Central Computer  of
Jerusalem University had been infected. It had not.

 The Israel Virus #1 was,  nonetheless,  a pre-virus for a lot of
others.  The  next  version was the Jerusalem B Virus  (which  no
longer  had the bug with the .EXE files),  after which  came  the
Jerusalem C Virus (also called New Jerusalem Virus, which had the
timer function removed and would thus remain invisible until  the
first  Friday the 13th).  The Jerusalem C Virus is thought to  be
the  pre-virus for at least three other viruses:  The Black  Hole
Virus
 (also called Russian Virus, which tried to pose as an anti-
virus),  the  Century A Virus (also called  Oregon  Virus,  which
remains  inactive up to January 1st 2000,  and will then  destroy
the  FATs and sector 0 and put the message 'Welcome to  the  21st
century'  on the screen) and the Jerusalem D Virus  (which  would
destroy FATs on Friday the 13th).  The latter would later  result
in  Jerusalem E Virus (destroys FATs on Friday the 13th as  well,
but  only starting in 1990),  whereas the Century A  Virus  would
result  in,  surprise surprise,  the Century B Virus (that  would
additionally corrupt all write operations of BACKUP.COM,  the MS-
DOS 'backup' command program).

 More  viruses  have been triggered by 'Friday  the  13th'  since
then,  though no link with any of the aforementioned viruses  has
been made clear.  On Friday the 13th of January 1989,  some major
British  companies (among which banks,  hospitals and  the  stock
market)  suffered from a virus that suddenly became  active,  for
example.  It  had small dots move diagonally over the screen  and
create  'black holes' in texts.  The British phone system  nearly
crashed  when  all the companies involved  started  contacting  a
company in Amersham (South-West England) that was specialised  in
recovering lost data.
 On October 13th 1989,  a Friday again,  a virus called Datacrime
II
  caused  quite  some  harassment among  PC  users  once  more;
Datacrime I and Datacrime II B also exist.

 3.2.2    THE BRAIN VIRUS

 One  of the most notorious viruses known in the  United  States,
and one of the first viruses to be found on the PC,  is the Brain
Virus
,  also  called Pakistani Virus due to the fact that it  has
been  written  by software developers in Pakistan who  wished  to
interfere  with  people  making  unauthorised  copies  of   their
programs.
 It  is a call bootsector virus,  which hides itself in a  disk's
bootsector  (thus  to  be loaded at  system  start-up)  and  uses
additional sectors to store itself on (which it will mark in  the
FAT as 'bad').
 It was discovered at the University of Miami,  and the  original
version  could  be  recognised by the fact that  it  changed  the
disk's volume label (disk name) to "(c) BRAIN".  It was  harmless
as  long  as  it did not encounter  specific  pirated  copies  of
software. It is thought to have spread to at least 100,000 disks,
sometimes destroying data.  Each time, it would leave the message
"WELCOME TO THE DUNGEON".
 Sometimes,  wrongfully,  it is also called Ping Pong Virus. This
may  be  due to the fact that the Brain Virus may have  been  the
pre-virus to that. The Ping Pong Virus, however, manifests itself
as  a  little bouncing ball on the screen,  that  will  interrupt
whatever you are doing on the computer.  Granted,  it's a pain in
the posterior, but otherwise quite harmless.

 3.2.3    THE LEHIGH VIRUS

 The  Lehigh  Virus was first found on computers  at  the  Lehigh
University in the United States,  from which it got its name.  It
is  contained in a reserved part of the COMMAND.COM boot file  of
MS-DOS boot disks,  and once it has infected the disk it will try
to copy to another COMMAND.COM file each time a disk is  accessed
(i.e.  when reading a directory or copying,  etc.).  The original
(parent)  version  would keep a counter - once  this  would  have
reached  4,  every disk to be used in the system later  would  be
completely  erased (bootsector and FAT would be overwritten  with
zeroes).
 It  does  not only work on floppy disks,  but on hard  disks  as
well.

 3.2.4    THE SEX.EXE VIRUS

 If  there  is  one virus that demonstrates  exactly  how  Trojan
Horses  function,  it is definitely the SEX.EXE Virus  (which  is
actually not a virus a such).
 The program itself, with is an .EXE type file that can be run on
its  own  (that  is  like a  .PRG  file  on  Atari  systems),  is
relatively harmless (apart from the occasional deafness that  may
or may not result from excessive viewing).  It shows a picture of
a  couple  of  people  trying to  prevent  the  human  race  from
extinction.
 While you watch it, however, the program infects the system with
a true virus.  After a while,  hard disk users would notice their
FATs  getting  corrupted  - the more you  would  use  the  system
utilities, the more severe the corruption would get.

 3.2.5    THE BLACK JACK VIRUS

 The Black Jack Virus,  of which rumours seem to indicate that it
was written either by an employee of a large software company  in
Stuttgart,  West  Germany,  or by students at the  University  of
Vienna, is a really mean one.
 It works much like many viruses on TOS computers do, which means
that a system vector is bent to point to it,  after which genuine
Operating  System  calls  (in this case the one  that  loads  and
executes  a program) get to do some virus  multiplication  before
they are actually being used.
 The  reason why it is called Black Jack Virus is the fact  that,
in the original version,  it is 1704 bytes long  (17+04=21).  The
Black  Jack Virus used an own kind of Memory Management  routine,
which made it very hard to detect.

 3.2.6    THE RUSH HOUR VIRUS

 The  Rush Hour Virus was written for demonstration  purposes  by
someone called B.  Fix in Heidelberg, West Germany. Obviously, he
is the kind of person that believes,  rather naively, that adding
a comment along the lines of "Typing in this program with the aim
of  spreading it to other systems is an offence!"  will  actually
not cause the virus to be spread anywhere.
 Lucky enough,  it does not do much except for multiplying itself
to  keyboard  driver files.  However,  a listing  of  this  virus
appeared in a book about viruses. It would probably not take much
more to adapt it to do something seriously harmful.
 One wonders seriously.

 3.2.7    DARK AVENGER

 Not  to  be mistaken by the thing Kathleen Turner refers  to  as
"bold  avenger"  in the Danny the Vito film "War of  the  Roses",
this  virus is resident and extremely prolific at  infecting  any
executable  files opened for any reason (even using the DOS  COPY
and XCOPY commands will cause both the source-and target files to
become infected). Another name for this virus is Black Avenger.
 This  virus was considered worth mentioning as it is  the  first
virus  that  has  been  officially  deliberately  spread  in  The
Netherlands, which also lead to the first ever lawsuit involving,
if it may be called that in a "1984" way,  virus crime.  That was
in October 1990.
 Curiously  enough,  the  virus contains the  text  string  "This
program  was  written  in the  city  of  Sofia.  Eddie  lives....
Somewhere  in Time!".  This particular virus author  from  Sofia,
Bulgaria,  is  thought  to be responsible for at least 20  to  30
viruses  on  the  PC.  A  more  recent  version  of  his  'work',
Nomenklatura, has been reported to have once infected the British
House of Commons Library computers.

 3.2.8    THE MICHAELANGELO VIRUS

 Another  rather  notorious  virus that came into  the  news  but
recently (early 1992) was the Michaelangelo Virus, probably named
after the fact that its date of activity was the birthday of  the
famous artist of old (no,  not after one of those dreadful  Ninja
Hero  thingies!).  It is supposed to have been written either  in
Scandinavia  or the Netherlands.  It was programmed to strike  at
Friday,  March  6th 1992.  Even before it struck it  was  already
estimated  that  it  would  hurt  more  than  1,000,000  Personal
Computers  world  wide,   with  an  estimated  damage  of  almost
£100,000,000 - which just goes to show how viruses can fright the
living daylights out of people who don't know what to do  against
them.
 The  Michaelangelo Virus is particularly destructive.  When  the
system  date happens to be March 6th 1992,  it will simply  erase
each and every hard disk sector.  It will not be hard to  imagine
what kind of damage may result from that.
 A  simple solution would have been to skip that  date,  i.e.  on
March 5th change the date to the 7th,  and on the real March  7th
(when the computer 'thinks' it's March 8th) change it back to the
real date.

 3.2.9    JOKEWARE

 An  English company called Hi-Jinx software launched  a  package
called "Jokeware" not too long ago.  It is actually a package 'to
amuse your friends',  and contains various virus-like things that
will make a Pacman eat the screen at a certain time, or that will
print a 'hard disk formatted' message on the screen. Harmless, of
course, but only if you are aware of its humorous intent.
 It says it restores an 'infected' PC back to its old self within
a maximum of 10 minutes - so any aggravation should be temporary.

 3.3      AMIGA VIRUSES

 It's easy to remember the days, early 1987, when the first tales
about viruses on the Commodore Amiga were heard at local computer
clubs.  I myself remember the way we used to laugh at Amiga users
struck  by viruses - rather childish,  really - before they  were
discovered on the ST.

 Amiga  viruses work in much the same way as their  TOS  computer
counterparts.  They also mostly use the bootsector (which on  the
Amiga is called boot block, and which happens to be two sectors -
i.e.  1024 bytes - long),  out of which they copy themselves into
memory,  point  a  system  vector to themselves and  run  in  the
background.  Normally, memory-resident Amiga viruses seem to nest
themselves into an Amiga's memory at the addresses $7E800, $7EC00
or $7F800.

 The first virus on the Amiga was the SCA Virus,  which gave away
its  presence by scrolling the message "Something  wonderful  has
happened - Your AMIGA is alive !!!" across the screen every  time
it  had been successfully multiplied.  It was actually  harmless,
and was only active during booting.  The thing that caused it  to
get very widely spread was the fact that it was originally spread
unintentionally on a regular program disk.
 The next virus to occur was the so-called Byte Bandit Virus.  It
did  not destroy any data,  but was not totally harmless  either.
For  starters,  it manipulated the DoIO ('Do  Input  Output',  an
Operating System sub-program in the Amiga) vector so that it  was
able to copy itself to every single boot block it possibly could.
After the second reset and the sixth copy,  it started a  counter
that would black-out the screen after seven (PAL version) or five
minutes (NTSC version).  Although this would mean RESET for  most
people,  a  hidden  option in the virus  (pressing  [L-ALT],  [L-
AMIGA],  [SPACE],  [R-AMIGA], [R-ALT]) enabled the user to switch
the screen back again for a couple of minutes.
 There  have  also been adapted versions of both  these  viruses;
Obelisk,   AEK,   LSD,  Pentagon,  Bamiga  Sector  One,  Warhawk,
Micromaster and Northstar,  for example,  are all versions of the
SCA Virus.

 Whereas the ones above were boot block viruses, the third one to
occur, the IRQ Virus, was a link virus that infected system files
(making  them  1,060  bytes longer).  It used  some  of  the  CLI
(Command  Line Interpreter) commands to multiply itself.  It  was
discovered around January 1989.
 Next things that occurred on the Amiga were the so-called Lamer-
Exterminator  Viruses
,  of which the third type (#3)  was  really
something new again:  It detoured all I/O operations from/to  the
boot block to another sector,  so that theoretically even a  disk
containing  a boot block could be infected without  the  original
boot block being destroyed!
 Other  viruses on the Amiga are,  for example,  the  boot  block
viruses Revenge,  GadaffiDisk-DoctorTimebomb and Byte Warrior
(also  known  as DASA);  other link viruses  are  BSG9,  Disaster
Master  V2
  (also  known  under  the  name  CLI   Virus),   Smily
Cancer/Centurions
VirusslayerVKill, and Travelling Jack.
 There are supposed to be well over 100 viruses on the Amiga.

 In  his "Terminator" virus killer program manual (which used  to
be   marketed  by  English  CRL  plc.   before  they  went   into
receivership) its author,  R.G.  Pickles, stated that disk write-
protection on the Amiga is purely software - in other words it is
the programmer's responsibility to protect the user from  writing
to write-protected disks. This seems to make the Amiga a lot more
vulnerable to virus infection than Atari systems.
 Some  popular  virus  killers on the  Amiga  are,  for  example,
"Terminator",  "System Z 4.0",  "Blizzard Protector",  "LSD Virus
Checker" and "Ass Protecter 1.0".

 On an older Commodore machine,  the Commodore 64,  viruses  also
exist.  As a matter of fact,  as recently as early 1992 a  German
magazine   called  "64'er"  published  a   rather   controversial
competition for its readers that involved the writing of the most
brilliant Commodore 64 virus
.  Apparently the chief editor was on
holiday around that time...

 3.4      MACINTOSH VIRUSES

 Some  rather  interesting stories concerning viruses  are  known
from the world of the Apple MacIntosh,  the computer that some of
you may know through popular so-called 'MacIntosh Emulators'  the
likes of "Magic Sac", "Aladdin" or "Spectre".
 Probably  the  most  well-known MacIntosh virus  is  the  Scores
Virus
,  which was first found in 1987 and reported by R.  Roberts
in  his book "Computer Viruses" published by Compute!  Books  one
year after.  This virus started out when,  apparently,  dozens of
computers   were  sold  to  several  government   agencies   (The
Environment Protection Agency and NASA, but also Apple Computers'
Washington  DC sales office) with infected hard disks.  The  FBI,
would you believe,  was called in to investigate.  The virus  had
several  'time  bombs' built in,  and the symptoms  usually  were
printing problems,  the odd program crash or malfunction of  desk
accessory operations.
 Some time ago,  a journalist wanted to check out how  widespread
software piracy on the Mac was.  For this purpose, he created the
Joke Virus which primarily spread itself in the USA,  Canada and,
although to lesser extent,  to Europe.  This virus would print  a
certain  message on March 2nd,  after which it would  attempt  to
destroy  itself.  The fact that it also (accidentally)  destroyed
system-and other files could lead to substantial damage.
 Another story is that of a producer of educational software that
worked  for Microsoft,  Aldus.  Due to one of their  programmer's
systems  getting infected,  a master copy of a  graphics  program
called  "FreeHand" was supplied with a virus before it was  being
duplicated  in a copying machine that was also used to  duplicate
software for Microsoft,  Apple,  Lotus and Ashton-Tate (some  big
names  in the industry).  For three days,  infected software  was
being produced.  The virus in question,  the MacMag Virus that is
also  known as Peace Virus,  has the dubious honour of being  the
first  virus  in  history  ever to have  been  widely  spread  on
original software.

 Another  virus  for the MacIntosh,  which was first  seen  early
1988,  is  the  Frankie Virus,  also often called  Aladdin  Virus
because it's thought only to appear (or even only to work) on the
"Aladdin"  software  MacIntosh emulator for the  Atari  range  of
computers.  Its aim,  supposedly,  is to prevent the spreading of
pirate copies of this MacIntosh emulation software. The virus can
copy itself, though it is not quite known how it does that. It is
not even known whether it is a link-or a bootsector virus.  After
a  while of computing (hardly more than five  minutes),  the  top
line  of the screen scrolls up and displays the message  "Frankie
say:  No  more piracy".  Immediately after that,  the  system  is
frozen.  Pressing  the  reset button no longer  re-activates  the
emulator either.

 Some other viruses on the Mac, to round this off, are nVirINIT
29
ANTIMacMugWDEFZUL and MDEF.

 3.5      APPLE II VIRUSES

 The first virus to appear on the Apple II series of computers, a
much older type of computer than the MacIntosh,  was called Cyber
Aids
.  It occurred for the first time early in 1988. This started
the  fight against viruses on the Apple II,  lead by Glen  Bredon
with his popular "Apple-Rx" virus killer. The summer of that year
saw the release of a second virus,  called Festering  Hate.  Both
these  viruses  were of the link virus variety -  the  first  one
wiped  the main directory,  and the second one wiped  the  entire
disk.  These viruses are now very rare,  due to the effectiveness
of "Apple-Rx" in the virus battle.
 Another virus that has been quite nipped in the bud is the  BURP
Virus
.  This  destroys volume subdirectories and leaves the  name
"BURP" as the name of the destroyed volume.
 Two French viruses that only work on the Apple II GS are  Screen
Blanker 
and Load Runner.  These are both bootsector viruses.  The
latter one is rather nasty:  On a date before September,  it will
only copy itself.  On odd days in September,  it will change  the
border colours.  On a date after September,  it clears both  boot
blocks (Apple II disks have two boot blocks).

 3.6      NOTORIOUS COMPUTER GROUPS

 In  a chapter about general history of computer viruses,  it  is
highly appropriate to devote a bit of space to two hacking groups
that  have 'earned' the right to be mentioned,  if only  for  the
fact  that  their  names  seem  to  pop  up  repeatedly  in  most
journalists' publications pertaining computer viruses.

 3.6.1    THE CHAOS COMPUTER CLUB

 The Chaos Computer Club,  more commonly known as CCC, is located
in  Hamburg,  Germany.  They  publish their own  magazine  called
"Datenschleuder",  and have been known to hack their way into Top
Security  United States computer systems like those of the  NASA,
among some other rather illustrious facts.
 Some way or another,  they always seem to be the people that get
interviewed  or  questioned  whenever  the  topic  of   'computer
viruses'  appears - though they are actually hackers rather  than
virus writers.

 3.6.2    THE BAYRISCHE HACKER POST

 Unlike the Chaos Computer Club,  the Bayrische Hacker Post  from
Munich is thought to have produced viruses.  On the ST,  they are
believed to have conceived at least one bootsector virus (the BHP
Virus
) and one link virus (the Garfield and Papa Virus,  done  by
two people that regularly wrote for their magazine).
 The  Bayrische  Hacker Post also used to publish a  magazine  on
irregular basis,  called "Bayrische Hacker Post",  in German.  In
this,  various  topics concerning computers  (and,  indeed,  also
computer  viruses)  are covered.  Not much is known  about  their
current activities.