Skip to main content
© Jinxter

                             PART II
               THE "ULTIMATE VIRUS KILLER" MANUAL

                   5 - SEEK'N'DESTROY VIRUSES


 Following  the selection of this option,  another dialog box  is
put  on  the screen (see figure 5),  allowing you to  select  the
drive on which to start seeking'n'destroying viruses. The program
automatically detects any drives that are attached to your system
and  displays their identifiers in selection buttons.  Up  to  26
drives/partitions   may  be  selected,   with   the   unavailable
drives/partitions being represented in 'greyed-out' text.
 Please   note   that bootsector viruses can only   be   searched
(and   destroyed)  on floppy disk drives - A  and   B.  Selecting
drive  B is not possible when it is not actually  attached.  Link
viruses can be searched on either floppy-or hard disk (up to  and
including partition Z).
 You  may  select  a  drive  or  partition  by  clicking  on  its
appropriate  button  with  the mouse button or  by  entering  the
appropriate keyboard shortcut [ALTERNATE]-key.

 Once the drive to use is selected,   you can decide whether  you
want to examine your media for bootsector-or link viruses. If you
selected bootsector viruses,  you will get a prompt to insert the
disk you want to check.
 In  case  you selected the option to check for the  presence  of
link  viruses you will enter some further dialog boxes where  you
can  specify  which files you want to check and in what  way  you
want them to be checked.
 In the first dialog box you will be able to specify whether  you
want to scan an entire drive or partition (all files on a  floppy
disk or hard disk partition,  including those present in all  the
folders,  will be scanned recursively),  single files or folders,
or whether you want to exit.  If you opted for the option to scan
single files or folders you can either specify a full filename in
the  item  selector  box (in which case only that  file  will  be
scanned) or you can enter a folder you want to tree-scan  without
actually  specifying a file (in which case all the files in  that
specific folder - including all files and further folders present
in  it - will be scanned).  It is important not to select a  file
name  in the latter;  just enter the appropriate folder and  then
click on the item selector box' "OK" button.

 If  you decide to check an entire floppy disk for link  viruses,
the  "Ultimate Virus Killer" will also automatically  check  that
disk's bootsector (note: this is for floppy disks only!).
 Checking for link viruses on a whole partition or entire  folder
may  be aborted by pressing [ESCAPE] or [UNDO].  When  there  are
many infected files or when you have set "warnings on" and  there
are  many  packed files,  you may have to press the  [ESCAPE]  or
[UNDO] key a few times.

 There is  one rather important note  that applies to  bootsector
viruses:  IT   IS  POSSIBLE  THAT A PERFECTLY  HARMLESS  DISK  IS
SUSPECTED  OF  BEING   A VIRUS!   This   means  that  either  the
bootsector  of a harmless program is not yet recognised  and  not
yet  implemented in the "Ultimate Virus Killer",  or that  it  is
indeed  a   new  virus!   Whenever  the "Ultimate  Virus  Killer"
encounters  such  a disk,  you will be given the  possibility  to
either REPAIR the disk,  PRINT its contents,  WRITE A BOOTFILE or
LOOK AT IT.
 In  the  second and third cases,   we would very much  like   to
receive  the boot file that the "Ultimate Virus Killer" can write
on  a   disk  with enough  free space on it (at least  512  bytes
free).  When you do not have a disk nearby with sufficient  space
free,  you  may want to use the FORMAT option that will format  a
disk (single sided).   If you send  that disk  (or the print-out)
to  us (together with some written info about the disk  it   came
from and your name and address),   we will check it out and  send
it back as soon as possible provided you have supplied sufficient
International Reply Coupons (!).
 Please  make  sure the bootfiles are accompanied  by  sufficient
explanation as to what software they belong to,  for it's usually
impossible  to  determine this information  from  the  bootsector
contents and the bootfile file name only.

 It  is  likely  that the directories of disks  that  have  auto-
booting  bootsectors  on them will appear to be 'empty'  or  that
they seem to have 'corrupted files'.  This need not be (and  most
probably  isn't)  due  to virus infection but  to  some  software
protection  schemes' exotic disk formats,  some of which  include
there not being any files on the disk at all.

 IF YOU KNOW THAT THE SUSPECTED DISK CONTAINS NO VIRUS,  WE WOULD
VERY MUCH LIKE TO RECEIVE IT ANYWAY, BECAUSE OTHER PEOPLE MAY NOT
BE  AWARE  OF IT AND MIGHT ACCIDENTALLY  DESTROY  THEIR  PRECIOUS
SOFTWARE!!

 Please  send any disks in a good quality envelope that can  also
be  used for return mailing,   and write "CONTAINS MAGNETIC MEDIA
-  PLEASE  DO NOT X-RAY" on it in clear,   large  characters  (to
minimise  loss  of  data).   Do  NOT  FORGET  TO  ADD  sufficient
International Reply Coupons!  Disks without these cannot be  sent
back!
 Just  before  you  can select whether to write a  boot  file  or
simply  to  repair,   a dialog box will be displayed  that  tells
you   the  'Virus  Probability Factor' (or VPF for short)  -  the
probability   factor  that  the  disk  that  is  on  the  current
bootsector is indeed a virus (see figure 6).   The reliability of
this factor is quite high.

 The  VPF  is  produced  by scanning  the  code  present  in  the
bootsector for some vital virus characteristics:

Factor 1: The  presence of machine code that is to be found in  a
          routine that writes a sector to disk.
Factor 2: The presence of machine code that creates the  checksum
          for an executable bootsector.
Factor 3: The  presence  of magic checksums or  memory  locations
          that are needed to make a program reset-resistant.
Factor 4: The presence of the addresses of system variables  that
          viruses can link themselves to.

 If  a virus is encoded it will first decode it in its  own  disk
buffer. Various other tricks are employed, too, to make sure that
viruses that try to evade the 'Virus Probability Factor' will  be
found anyway.

 In  certain  cases,  an additional dialog box is  produced  (see
figure  7);  this  happens when an unknown disk is  found  to  be
largely  filled with the same value.  The larger  the  percentage
mentioned  in this dialog box,  the less the likelihood of  virus
infection  (quite  on  the  contrary,   one  might  add,  to  the
percentage   mentioned  with  the  'Virus   Probability   Factor'
calculation)!

 Note  on executable file extensions:  When you want to  check  a
whole  partition  or folder for link viruses it  is  possible  to
select  whether you only all files to be  checked,  or  so-called
executable files only. Executable files are files that can be run
directly by double-clicking on them from the desktop; other files
include  text files,  picture files,  source code files  and  the
like.
 When selecting to check executable files only,  the program will
only check files with extensions ".PRG",  ".TOS", ".APP", ".ACC",
and  ".TTP"  (including their disabled  counterparts  ".PRX"  and
".ACX").   These  are  normally  the  extensions  for  executable
programs.  Some  alternative desktops (such as  "NeoDesk")  allow
other file extensions to be executable,  e.g.  ".NPG" and ".NTP".
More  recent  TOS  versions also support  a  special  "GEM  Takes
Parameters"  executable file type with the extension  ".GTP".  To
check  these as well,  you would have to opt for ALL files to  be
treated,   or  you  will  have  to  configure  the  UVK.CFG  file
accordingly (see chapter 11).

 Note  for  users  of "MultiTOS": This Operating  System  uses  a
'unified  drive' (identifier "U:") in which certain folders  will
cause a crash when checking for link viruses.  You should refrain
from  checking the following  directories:  "U:\DEV",  "U:\PROC",
"U:\PIPE" and "U:\SHM".