Skip to main content
© TLR Designs

                            PART III
            THE ULTIMATE VIRUS KILLER BOOK APPENDICES

             B - ATARI TOS COMPUTER SYSTEM VARIABLES


 In  your computer's memory space between $400 and  approximately
$500 (both addresses hexadecimal), the so-called system variables
are  located.  These mostly consist of memory  addresses  through
which the Operating System jumps when having to perform  specific
tasks.
 In  this  appendix,  the system variables that are in  some  way
related  to  viruses  will be explained.  All  addresses  are  in
hexadecimal notation,  followed by their length (.L,  which means
longword
, i.e. 4 bytes).

 ADDRESS  NAME         FUNCTION
-----------------------------------------------------------------

 $404.L   etv_critic   The Critical Error Handler. At the address
                       contained  in this variable a  routine  is
                       located that tries to correct disk errors.
                       When  you  have  one  floppy  drive,   for
                       example,  the alert box to insert disk  B:
                       in  drive  A:  will be put on  the  screen
                       using this routine.

 $426.L   resvalid     Should  this  address  contain  the  magic
                       longword  value of $31415926,  the  system
                       will jump through the address contained in
                       system  variable  'resvector',   mentioned
                       below, when a warm reset is executed.

 $42A.L   resvector    This contains the address at which will be
                       jumped when a warm reset is executed - but
                       only  if  $426  is  valid  (i.e.  contains
                       $31415926).

 $42E.L   phystop      Here  you  will find the physical  top  of
                       memory,  the  physical end of RAM  memory.
                       With 1 meg machines, this is $100000 (half
                       meg $80000,  2 meg $200000, etc.). Viruses
                       often  use this to determine a safe  place
                       where to store themselves.  Sometimes they
                       change this address so that it points to a
                       lower RAM top than is possible.  The  area
                       above  that fake top of RAM and below  the
                       real  one can then be safe for viruses  to
                       hide in.

 $446.L   bootdev      Contains  the device number of  the  drive
                       from which was booted.  This is usually  0
                       (i.e.  drive A),  but when you have a hard
                       disk this is usually 2 (i.e. drive C).

 $44E.L   _v_bas_ad    The  address  of  the  logical  Video  RAM
                       Screen Base is located here.  In  English:
                       This  is the start of screen  memory,  the
                       bit  of memory in your computer  that  the
                       video chip sends the image to your monitor
                       of. Viruses often determine this to find a
                       safe spot for storing themselves,  because
                       32768 bytes are reserved for screen memory
                       while  the screen only 'needs'  32000.  So
                       the address in $44E plus 32000 is a  space
                       of  768  safe bytes for viruses  to  store
                       themselves in.
                       The above only applies to ST  resolutions.
                       TT  and Falcon screen resolutions can  use
                       up vast amounts of RAM which makes quite a
                       difference.  Viruses  for TT/Falcon  don't
                       used this method.

 $454.W   nvbls        The  number  of  vertical  blank   routine
                       addresses   located  at  the  address   in
                       _vblqueue (see below).

 $456.L   _vblqueue    At this address you will find the  address
                       of  a  list of routines executed  at  each
                       vertical blank (vbl).  One vertical  blank
                       happens each time your monitor's screen is
                       built  up anew,  i.e.  50 or 60 times  per
                       second   in  colour  mode  (depending   on
                       whether you're running in 50 or 60 Hz) and
                       71 times in monochrome mode. On the Falcon
                       these  frequencies can vary  more  widely.
                       The mouse is handled from one of these vbl
                       routines, for example.

 $472.L   hdv_bpb      The  vector  that is most  often  bent  by
                       bootsector viruses. At each disk swap, the
                       Operating System needs to determine  where
                       it  can find directory,  FAT,  etc.  of  a
                       disk.  This  is done by reading  the  BIOS
                       Parameter Block from a bootsector, done at
                       the  first disk access after a disk  swap.
                       The  routine that does this is located  at
                       the  address  contained  in  this   system
                       variable.

 $476.L   hdv_rw       This variable contains the address of  the
                       Operating  System routine for  reading  or
                       writing a sector from/to a floppy-or  hard
                       disk  (this routine is called rwabs -  see
                       appendix C).

 $47E.L   hdv_mediach  At the address contained in this  variable
                       you  will  find the routine  that  handles
                       Media Change (a routine called 'Mediach' -
                       see appendix C).

 $4BA.L   _hz_200      Counter  for the 200 Hz system  frequency.
                       Apart  from the interrupt that happens  at
                       every vbl,  there's also an interrupt that
                       happens 200 times per  second,  regardless
                       of the resolution you're in.  This counter
                       is  increased 200 times per second and  is
                       located  at this  longword  address.  Many
                       viruses  need random values  to  determine
                       which (of several) destruction routines to
                       execute,  or  to  determine  which  random
                       sector  on  disk  needs  to  be  read  and
                       corrupted.  Often  they  use  this  system
                       variable,   logically  'AND'  it  with   a
                       specific  value and get sort of  a  random
                       number. Usually only the least significant
                       word is taken.

 $4C6.L   _dskbufp     Disk Buffer Pointer, an address on which a
                       1024 byte disk buffer can be  found.  This
                       is  where sectors reside before  they  get
                       written/read to/from disk.  After booting,
                       the  bootsector  is  located  here.   Many
                       viruses put themselves at $600 bytes (hex)
                       above this address,  which seems a  rather
                       safe  spot  (though only on  TOS  versions
                       1.0x).