Skip to main content
© Phenomena

                            PART III
            THE ULTIMATE VIRUS KILLER BOOK APPENDICES

                  K - COMMONLY ASKED QUESTIONS


 The  "Ultimate Virus Killer" program and its  predecessors  have
been  supported  for almost eight years.  During that  time  many
questions have been asked by interested/ignorant/concerned users.
Some of the most popular ones will be summed up here.

 "CAN MS-DOS DISKS BE IMMUNIZED?"

 No,  unless you're prepared to lose MS-DOS compatibility. If you
immunize an MS-DOS compatible disk it will no longer be  readable
in  an MS-DOS compatible computer.  Even though the disk  formats
are readily interchangable,  for some reason or other a PC  wants
specific  values  on a disk's bootsector.  Please refer  to  "The
Book", chapter 6.6, for more details.
 It  is  advisable to keep one disk MS-DOS  compatible  for  file
exchange between your Atari and a PC (if you have one).

 "WHY  IS  IT  IMPOSSIBLE  TO CHECK  HARD  DISKS  FOR  BOOTSECTOR
VIRUSES?"

 Hard  disks can contain enormous amounts of data;  up to  a  few
gigabytes of them, in fact, are possible. The structure of a hard
disk bootsector depends on a great many factors,  the most  major
of  which is the set of specifications of partition data used  by
one  of  the respective hard disk driver programs on  the  market
(Atari, Supra, Protar, Huschi, ICD, etc., etc.).
 As  there  are  many different hard  disk  drivers  that  cannot
possibly  all  be examined and supported it  would  be  extremely
difficult to guarantee that nothing bad happens to all the  stuff
on your hard disk if I should decide to allow the "Ultimate Virus
Killer" to repair it.  As my funds do not suffice to pay for  the
lawsuits  I  could get involved in when wrecking  someone's  hard
disk  bootsector  (especially if the hard disk  were  to  contain
vital data of ultimate importance),  the program principally does
not  allow any repairs on hard disk to be  performed,  no  matter
what kind.

 "WHY ARE 99% SAFE BOOTSECTORS INCLUDED? ARE THEY SAFE?"

 Basically,   whenever  a  disk's  bootsector  outside  the  BIOS
Parameter  Block  is not entirely filled with the  same  value  I
cannot guarantee that it's 100% safe.  Hence I have included  the
'99%  safe'  thing,  which  in  more than 99%  of  all  cases  is
synonymous  with  '100%  safe' and should  therefore  perhaps  be
called '99.99% safe'.  The best thing to do is write a boot file,
then erase (i.e.  repair) the bootsector.  If the software  still
works properly,  you need not send the boot file. If the software
fails to work from then on,  please send us the bootfile and  the
disk  containing the software.  The program will  be  functioning
again  and  it  will  from then on be  recognised  by  the  later
versions of the "Ultimate Virus Killer", too.

 "WHAT DO THE ADDRESSES ON THE SYSTEM STATUS SCREEN TELL ME?"

 They don't tell you much. All they do is display the hexadecimal
address  to which the respective Operating System vectors  point,
which is in itself unimportant but, frankly, it looks nice.
 The  things that do supply you with information are the  figures
in  brackets  behind them.  These identify  the  application  (or
virus) that is found at that hexadecimal address by the "Ultimate
Virus Killer" analysis routines.
 Please refer to "The Manual", chapter 9, for more information.

 "WHAT IS THE ANSWER TO LIFE, THE UNIVERSE AND EVERYTHING?"

 You  needn't ask me that.  A super computer by the name of  Deep
Thought
  (the  best  computer ever but one)  calculated  for  two
million years to come up with the answer.  The answer, of course,
being forty-two.
 The  question,   of  course,  is  a  different  kettle  of  fish
altogether.

 "ARE ST VIRUSES DANGEROUS FOR THE TT OR FALCON?"

 Roughly  speaking,  ST bootsector viruses are  harmless  whereas
link viruses can be as dangerous as on any regular ST. Bootsector
viruses  will  probably  cause crashes  during  booting  when  an
infected  disk  is  in  the drive,  or  during  later  drive  I/O
operations.  They usually cannot copy themselves any more, as the
TT/Falcon trap handler is different from that of the ST (the trap
handler  is  something most viruses manipulate heavily  and  from
which  they  can determine when they have to act  and  when  they
shouldn't).  Some  viruses  are  specifically  TT-and/or  Falcon-
compatible,  so  you  should get rid of  all  bootsector  viruses
always anyway.

 "WHAT TO DO WHEN A COMMERCIAL BOOTSECTOR CANNOT YET BE  REPAIRED
BY THE CURRENT VERSION OF THE ULTIMATE VIRUS KILLER?"

 You can do two things here. First, you can order the next update
of the "Ultimate Virus Killer". Chances are substantial that your
particular title will be supported there.  If not,  however,  you
should  resort  to the second  possibility:  Most  companies  are
prepared to replace your original with a new one if you pay  them
a  nominal fee (usually details with regard to this may be  found
in the software's manual).
 In the latter case, we would surely appreciate you sending those
boot files to us once you receive the proper disks, so that other
people  like  you will be more lucky if they run  into  the  same
problem...

 "WHY  DOES IT SOMETIMES TAKE A RATHER LONG TIME BEFORE I GET  MY
STUFF  SENT  BACK (ALSO ENTAILS THE ANSWER TO THE  QUESTION  "WHY
SHOULD I NEVER ENCLOSE ENGLISH STAMPS FOR RETURN POSTAGE?")"

 When you send your correspondence (letters, print-outs and disks
alike) to Douglas Communications in Stockport to be treated, they
arrive in the hands of Niall McKiernon.  He's a nice man but like
most  of  us  he's not raking in dosh and  therefore  saves  some
consumer packages before he sends them off in a small package  to
me  - and I live in the Netherlands.  So on average your  package
spends quite a bit of time before it ends up on my desk, where it
can spend anything from two days to a few more weeks (the  latter
in  the case of University exams which happen to me five times  a
year) before it gets sent back to Niall in Stockport.
 So,  even if it takes longer than you might consider ideal, your
packages  will  be  treated  and will be  sent  back  unless  you
specifically  state that we needn't bother replying (as  is  also
the case with most bootsector print-outs).
 To  assure  promptest treatment,  you should take  care  of  the
following:  Send  as little as possible.  Supply us with a  label
clearly   stating   your   address,    and   include   sufficient
International Reply Coupons so the stuff can be sent back to  you
(Remember:  I  don't live in the UK so I can't do  anything  with
little   pieces  of  sticky  paper  featuring  small   or   large
resemblances of Queen Elizabeth II on them!).  Also, please write
your  name and address on the disk label as well as  any  further
pieces of paper you might want to add.
 You  can send stuff to me directly,  of course.  Always  include
IRCs!


 "THE  VIRUS  KILLER DOES NOT RECOGNISE A GAME AND  INSTEAD  SAYS
'100% SAFE'. WHAT'S WRONG?"

 Nothing's  wrong.   Not  all  games  have  special   bootsectors
containing  a  little program to make them load  and  run.  As  a
matter  of  fact,  most games only have  an  ordinary  bootsector
pretty similar to, say, any disk you've just formatted. Many even
have MS-DOS compatible bootsectors (because that's the way modern
TOS versions happen to format them).
 You  may  wonder  how games  succeed  in  booting  automatically
without making use of the bootsector. Well, they just make use of
the   ancient  AUTO  folder  method  (please  see  the   glossary
appendix).

 "WHAT  SHOULD  I  DO IF I (HEAVEN FORBID!) FIND  A  BUG  IN  THE
"ULTIMATE VIRUS KILLER" PROGRAM?"

 Heaven forbid indeed!
 Basically what we need is a description of your system setup and
the precise position in the program at which the crash  occurred.
Also try running the program with no accessories and AUTO  folder
programs installed and see if it still crashes.
 It  is important that you try and recreate the crash,  and  then
supply  us with a detailed description of how we can recreate  it
ourselves and where the bug appeared as precisely as possible.
 In  any case,  the bug will then cease to exist as of  the  next
available version (hopefully)!

 "WHY  DO  LINK VIRUSES SEEM TO GET SO LITTLE  ATTENTION  IN  THE
OVERALL APPROACH OF THE "ULTIMATE VIRUS KILLER" PROGRAM?"

 On  the surface this seems to be true,  but in the core  of  the
program it is hardly so. Inside its code, there are many routines
to quickly scan partitions, check for all known link viruses and,
indeed,  check whether or not there's a possibility of a new kind
of  link  virus having infected your files.  Although  only  five
basic link virus structures are known at the moment, you may rest
assure that the "Ultimate Virus Killer" caters for all your  link
virus  protection  needs as well,  including the  recognition  of
potentially new ones!

 "WHY  IS  IT THAT SOMETIMES REGULAR PROGRAMS ARE THOUGHT  TO  BE
'CRACKED' VERSIONS?"

 A  'cracked' version is an illegal copy of a game that has  been
altered  by someone so that it can be illegally copied - the  so-
called  copy protection has been removed so that it is no  longer
impossible to spread it to others.  Although piracy is in no  way
condoned  by this,  the "Ultimate Virus Killer" does cater for  a
recognition of cracked games,  although these cannot actually  be
restored  in  the way you may restore a commercial game  or  demo
using  the  "Ultimate Virus Killer".  These 'cracked'  games  are
identified by "(Cr)" in the recognition alert box.  Often, people
send in copies of bootsectors of cracked versions of games before
we have a chance to get our hands on the original bootsector. The
'cracked'  (Cr)  version  is then implemented  and  the  original
isn't.  As  these  bootsectors are often relatively  identical  a
mistake can happen here - an original game might be recognised as
cracked version of it!
 Please drop us a line if something like this happens,  as it  is
rather embarrassing.
 Believe  me,   I  would  have  left  out  these  'cracked'  disk
recognitions if it wouldn't make things more difficult for me.

 "ARE   THOSE  VIRUSES  THAT  DISGUISE  THEMSELVES  AS   'MS-DOS'
BOOTSECTORS ACTUALLY DANGEROUS FOR AN MS-DOS COMPUTER?"

 No.  The thing that makes certain disks MS-DOS compatible  (i.e.
that they can be read from and written to by an MS-DOS  computer)
is  the  presence of a few bytes right at the  beginning  of  the
bootsector.  The rest of the bootsector - in the case of  viruses
such as WolfZorro and Beilstein - is filled with Atari-specific
code and is therefore totally harmless on an MS-DOS PC.

 "IF I LOOK INTO THE BOOTSECTOR OF AN IMMUNIZED DISK,  I SEE  THE
WORD 'PUKE'. IS THAT SOME SORT OF VIRUS?"

 First of all, if you look at the rest of the bootsector you will
see  it has harmless contents - apart from a text it's  primarily
filled  with zeroes.  There is no space for a virus.  It is  100%
safe indeed!
 Now what does that "puke" word mean?  Actually,  the word "puke"
at that precise location forms the immunization against the  Puke
Virus
.  If  you  think the presence of the p-word is in  any  way
offensive,  please  direct  your anger to the  virus  programming
fraternity.

 "I CANNOT READ THE .IMG FILES WRITTEN BY THE PROGRAM WHEN  USING
THEM  WITH  A  PROGRAM SUCH AS  'IMAGECOPY'  OR  ANOTHER  DRAWING
PROGRAM. HOW COME?"

 I  don't know why I decided to use the ".IMG" extension for  the
bootsector  files  written by the  "Ultimate  Virus  Killer".  It
sounded nice,  and it seemed logical to use because it's sortof a
bootsector image file.  However, it's not an .IMG in the sense of
"a  graphic  file standard you can read into many  DTP  programs,
word processors and drawing programs".  Sorry for this confusion.
I should maybe have used ".BIN",  ".B_S",  ".BOT" or even  ".B_B"
(right, Mike?).
 But I haven't, so it's too late now.

 "WHY  ARE  ALL  THE ULTIMATE VIRUS KILLER  WINDOWS  SO  BIG  AND
CHUNKY?"

 All  window layouts in the "Ultimate Virus Killers" are  located
in a so-called Resource file (RSC file).  Some programs have them
separately  on  disk,  but  the "Ultimate Virus  Killer"  has  it
included within its program code.
 Each  window/dialog layout requires space within that RSC  file.
In  order to preserve as much memory space as  possible,  I  only
make use of a few basic window/dialog layout structures in  which
all  the different dialog messages are written  whenever  needed.
Because  the  bigger messages also needed to  fit  in  them,  the
smaller  messages  might look a bit pompous.  I agree  with  some
reviewers that it doesn't look too aesthetically pleasing, but it
does preserve memory space. It's a matter of priorities, really.