Skip to main content
© Pain

What I've felt
What I've known
Never shined through in what I've shown
Never be
Never see
Won't see what might have been

What I've felt
What I've known
Never shined through in what I've shown
Never free
Never me
So I dub thee unforgiven
                          "The Unforgiven" - part III - Metallica

          THE EUROPEAN COMPUTER TRADE SHOW (ECTS) 1991
                     APRIL 14TH-16TH, LONDON

                      by Richard Karsmakers

 Probably  the  most  important  trade  show  for   entertainment
software, the European Computer Trade Show (ECTS) was held at the
Business centre in London,  at about a 10 minutes' walk from some
small  northern line tube station which' name  has  unfortunately
slipped my mind.
 I was able to visit this show in my official capacity of  editor
at  the  Dutch  ACN (Atari Computerclub Nederland)  for  which  I
started  working  as of April 1st.  One of the highlights  of  an
earlier  issue of the magazine "Atari ST Nieuws" (which  the  ACN
publishes)  was  the  selection of  the  "Entertainment  Software
Awards",  which  allowed  the readers to choose  their  favourite
games for nomination into the official "European Computer Leisure
Awards"  that  were  also to be given away at  this  occasion  in
London.
 My  boss (senior editor) and the deputy editor had already  left
the day before when I arrived at Amsterdam Airport at about 8  AM
on  Sunday  morning,  April 17th 1991.  I was armed  with  but  a
suit'n'tie,  a load of business cards and a winning smile.  In my
small  attaché  case  were  located  some  books  to  read   (two
"Dragonriders of Pern" volumes),  a spare T-shirt to sleep in,  a
brush, a bar of soap and toothbrush gear.

 Never before had I got up at 5 AM on a Sunday morning, and never
had  I had such a rough landing as the one I experiences when  we
touched  down  at  Heathrow.  My guts seemed to  knot  and  twist
violently, and the pilot seemed to enjoy having them do so.
 I  was  more than happy to feel English soil under  my  feet  at
last.  As I only had a bit of hand luggage with me,  I was spared
the  trouble of having to wait for suitcases and having  to  sort
out  miscellaneous  underwear  that is usually  hurled  into  the
mechanism of the conveyor belt due to some inconveniently located
adlestrop.
 The trip to the centre of London was swift.  The tube was hardly
filled  and  there  were only few delays  due  to  the  perpetual
'improvements'  the  British tend to inflict on  their  means  of
public transport.
 Well, at least they didn't strike.
 Brief visions at this thought hit my mind with a deafening blow.
It  reminded  me of the LateST NEWS Quest  of  July  1989,  where
Stefan and myself had more than just a bit of trouble when trains
and  tubes  considered it necessary not to move at  all  for  two
days (and the other days they moved 'strangely').
 I arrived at the Business Centre just past 10 AM, which was just
in time to be too late for the appointment I was supposed to have
in the Press Lounge.
 Of course nobody was at the press lounge.  Fortunately, this was
due to everybody else being even later than I was rather than  me
being later than the others. I should have known. Stupid me.
 We  were  told  to  meet at the  Press  Lounge  from  where  all
journalists  would then continue towards the restaurant for  what
they called "The Final Judging".
 Even the organising people didn't seem to be able to locate  the
restaurant, but eventually we got there.
 For  the  "European  Computer  Leisure  Awards",   over   thirty
magazines  of all over Europe had specified their  nominees.These
had  all  been  processed  and  the  winners  had  already   been
calculated  - except for a few categories where there had been  a
draw of some kind.
 For  starters,  only a couple of journalists had arrived at  the
restaurant.  There  were about ten Germans,  someone from  Sweden
(from the Commodore magazine Dator) and someone from Italy.  And,
of course, we were there (yeah...).
 We got 'final judging' lists in our hands. Oddly enough, some of
the  nominees (and even winners) turned out to be games  not  yet
launched  on  quite a lot of systems,  and even games  that  were
quite  old.  There  was quite some hassle as  to  the  nomination
criteria, and it was already clear that the whole thing was a bit
of a sham.
 For starters,  the people present unanimously disagreed to  "The
Killing Game Show" already having been assigned the winner in the
category "Best Action Game".  As there was supposed to be a video
running in the background of the award ceremony which had already
largely  been  made  to feature this  game,  this  could  not  be
changed.  Nonetheless, the organiser told us we could re-vote and
he would see what he could do.  "Rick Dangerous II" lost only  by
one  vote from "Turrican II" (well,  with three quarters  of  the
journalists  being  Germans  and "Turrican  II"  being  a  German
product that's likely to happen).
 We  continued  by drinking something,  and voting in  the  other
categories where there had been draws.
 I have never come across such a fraudulous judging.  If I  would
have brought my girlfriend along,  "Rick Dangerous II" might have
won.  The  categories that had yet to be assigned a  winner  were
selected  by  a non-representative amount of the  total  European
amount of magazines (about 5 of the total of 31). Weirdly, "ZERO"
hadn't voted at all and the biggest German magazine "ASM"  hadn't
voted  either - this latter because the Markt & Technik group  of
magazines  there had threatened not to vote if "ASM" was  allowed
to vote (Markt & Technik has about 10 mags and "ASM" is only 1).
 Democracy my ass!
 And on top of all that, the votes were definitely biased towards
the English market (as there were about 10 English mags involved,
and e.g. only 1 French...).

 So  we were all a bit pissed off when we left the restaurant  to
start  the actual walking around the show.  That was why we  were
here  after all:  Gathering as much slides,  press  releases  and
games  as possible so that we would be able to fill the  upcoming
couple of issues with some decent game review material.
 On  the  show I was to meet once more some of the  awfully  nice
people that roam through the software industry.

 But allow me to first describe that Sunday evening, as I'm kinda
eager to.
 The award ceremony was held at the London Hippodrome, one of the
Top Venues there.  Tickets cost almost £50,  but I was  fortunate
enough to arrange free ones for the three of us.
 I had never been at the Hippodrome before.  London Paupers  were
standing around the entrance,  gaping, as people dressed in suits
entered the place. I imagined I would meet all of the interesting
people   in  the  industry  there,   maybe  even  some   licensed
celebrities,  but it turned out to be quite less than what I  had
expected.
 After a long while of waiting, during which we could have our go
at  a reasonable buffet and some champagne,  the  award  ceremony
really started.
 It started off with a whole load of excuses.
 The video turned out not to work. So there was no video.
 The prizes turned out not to have arrived in time. So there were
only the bottles of champagne to give away.
 Bummer.
 The awards, however, were the following:

 Best animation: "Dragon's Lair II: Time Warp" (Readysoft)
 Best graphics: "Shadow of the Beast II" (Psygnosis)
 Best sound: "Shadow of the Beast II" (Psygnosis)
 Best action game: "Killing Game Show" (Psygnosis)
 Best adventure/RPG: "Secret of Monkey Island" (Lucasfilm)
 Best puzzle game: "Klax" (Domark)
 Most original packaging: "Lemmings" (Psygnosis)
 Best packaging: "Ultima VI" (Origin)
 Best simulation: "F-19 Stealth Fighter" (Microprose)
 Software house of the year: Psygnosis
 Computer game of the year: "Lemmings" (Psygnosis)
 Console game of the year: "Tetris" (Nintendo)
 Console of the year: Lynx (Atari)
 Computer of the year: Amiga 500 (Commodore)

 To  say that some of the journalists present were  surprised  at
the mentioning of "The Killing Game Show" as the best action game
would  be a mild understatement.  Even though there was no  video
(which  had been the original excuse for keeping the thing on  as
a winner) the alternative,  "Turrican II", wasn't even as much as
mentioned.
 A  flippin' disgrace,  this entire award ceremony.  And why  the
f.ck  did they elect the Amiga 500 to be 'computer of  the  year'
(as it's 3 years old or so)?
 Well,  I  could  at least agree on the 'game of  the  year'  and
'console  of  the  year'.   Two  products  that  had  fully   and
unreservedly deserved this.
 After  the ceremony,  we got confronted with a British  comedian
called  Les  Dennis.  Obviously  he was very well  known  to  the
British but to most of the foreign guests his humour  was,  let's
say,  'strange'.  The  audience  just kept on talking  with  each
other, which hardly made things easier for Mr. Dennis.
 After  about 20 minutes,  for which he was said to  have  cashed
£4000, he quit stating that "you have been a challenge and you've
won".
 Well at least he vanished.
 The next day, everybody spoke of this screw-up. Even the English
had found him crap.
 Unfortunately, there was nothing more to be seen. Some extremely
loud  disco  music was pumped up and this  continued  the  entire
evening. If I would have liked disco music I would have loved the
disco  lights  with  all  them  lazers  and   stroboscopes.   But
unfortunately  I  didn't  so  I couldn't.  I  did  find  my  eyes
wondering  across the dance floor occasionally,  locking at  some
extremely  ravishing  girls  that had seemingly  divine  ways  of
moving their bodies to the beat. Wow.
 Celebs?
 I did manage to see 'Wild Bill' Stealey (the American founder of
Microprose)  and  I was able to shake hands once  more  with  Les
Edgar  and Glenn Corpes of the Bullfrog Team.  I also  met  Peter
Molyneux  there (the actual designer of "Populous"),  who  I  had
always  wanted to meet.  They had received a Japanese  prize  for
game of the year or something with "Power Monger",  and that  was
reason enough to congratulate them.
 There  were no other celebrities there.  I only saw  the  Bitmap
Brothers  briefly - but they vanished from sight before  I  could
have a word with them.
 Disappointed,  we  left the venue quite soon.  We took  a  brief
stroll through China Town,  where I lost about £20 gambling in  a
multitude  of  gambling/arcade  halls before we  hit  the  Oxford
Street McDonalds, taking some junk food with us the hotel room.
 My boss snores viciously, by the way. He comes a close second to
ex-ST NEWS co-conspirator Frank Lemmen!

 But  let  me  not stray any more.  Let me sum  up  some  of  the
companies I visited on Sunday and Monday,  and what software  can
be  expected from them in the near (or maybe not quite  so  near)
future.

Hisoft

 At  this  company  I had a word with  Mr.  David  Link.  He  was
presenting  version  1.2 of their  flight  sim  "ProFlight".  New
versions of "Lattice C" and "Devpac" are now out for the  TT,  at
£249  and £129 respectively.  For those interested in the  Devpac
developer (hi Michael B..b..b...): It's still not official.

Rainbow Arts

 A  pretty  lady  called Kristin Dodt (or  something  like  that)
received  me here.  Apart from the fact that she was very  pretty
(which  is altogether hardly important,  is it?) she  could  also
speak English rather f.cking brilliant, in spite of the fact that
she's German.  They have in the mean time launched a shoot-'em-up
platform game called "Turrican II",  and they will soon release a
puzzle  game  by the name of "Logical" and  a  humorous  business
simulation called "Mad TV - Money, Love and Viewing Figures".

Millenium

 Millenium  was  demonstrating "Moonshine Racers"  and  "Robocod"
(the follow-up to "James Pond"). The first game is already out on
the  streets,  but  we'll have to wait 'till  September  for  the
latter.  Which reminds me:  I met Steve Bak again on the show. He
was walking around in a seemingly aimless fashion,  telling me he
was  still doing something for Microprose about which  he  wasn't
allowed  to  tell  much  except for the  fact  that  it  was  for
Microprose.  His  Vectordean colleague Chris Sorrell was  at  the
moment  doing  "Robocod" which looked promising  (I  don't  doubt
that, as "James Pond" was pretty cool, too).
 Steve  Bak  hasn't  change  a bit.  But  I  suppose  you're  not
interested in that.
 Millenium,  anyway,  will  also soon release a  futuristic  ball
sports   game  called  "Stormball"  and  a  shoot-'em-up   in   a
prehistoric surrounding called "Tentacle".

Accolade

 At Accolade I met once more Ms.  Nadia Singh.  She used to  work
for Barrington Harvey PR during our 1989 LateST NEWS  Quest,  but
had  already transferred to Accolade Europe by the time I met  in
November of that year on the Amiga Show in Cologne.
 They  are  only doing one game for the ST soon,  which  will  be
"Stratego",  based on the board game of the same name.  They have
set up another label,  Ballistic, which they will use for console
releases on Sega Megadrive and Nintendo Super Famicom.
 In  spite of the fact that certain people seem not to  have  any
faith  in consoles and the future (hi Willi!),  surely a  lot  of
companies  seem  to be doing console games - Accolade  being  the
first of a lot I visited.

Microprose

 At  Microprose I met Ms.  Julia Coombs - one of the  few  people
still  at  the same company where they were  working  during  the
LateST NEWS Quest.  I suppose you're not interested to hear  that
she  still looked as lovely as then,  but I wanted to mention  it
anyway.
 We  all  know that Microprose has bought up  quite  some  labels
during  the  last  two  years.  Firebird,  Rainbird,  Silverbird,
Cosmi...  and they also started Microstyle and Microstatus. After
some  heavy  reorganising,   they  have  now  reduced  these   to
Microprose, Microstyle and Rainbird.
 The  first  one will bring out "Railroad Tycoon"  (business  and
strategy  simulation,  launchable around the time you read  this)
and  "F15  Strike Eagle II" (same release  time).  Rainbird  will
launch "Midwinter II - Flames of Freedom" (should be out already)
and  "Betrayal" (already out in April).  A game that seemed  most
promising  to  me  was  Microstyle's  "Air  Duel"  (an  air  duel
simulator with simultaneous split-screen two-player  mode).  Keep
your eyes open for this one.

Core Design

 The people behind "Rick Dangerous" (jolly good "I" and  terribly
brilliant  "II")  have got the hang of it,  and  have  also  been
launching  some games themselves.  It started with  "Corporation"
and  they have also done "Torvak the Warrior" (review in ST  NEWS
Volume  5 Issue 2),  and their most recent offering is  a  cutesy
platform  game in prehistoric surroundings called  "Chuck  Rock".
They should by now have published some more titles:  "Warzone" (a
kind   of   "Commando"),   "Frenetic"   (shoot-'em-up),   "AH-73M
Thunderhawk"  (3D  vector graphics chopper flight  sim,  due  for
release in August),  "Retro" (another futuristic sports romp, due
in   September),   "Heimdall"  (fantasy  RPG  in  November)   and
"Project 3" (December).

U.S. Gold

 As  usual,  one of the largest stands with the horniest  looking
bimbos was that of U.S.  Gold. Whatever you think of them, do not
underestimate  their knowledge of how to manipulate the press  to
their favour.
 "It's good to be gold," is their current slogan.  Well,  I guess
we'll  just have to believe them on their word.  They are not  at
the moment planning to do anything themselves, but they will do a
lot of the RPG Dragonlance titles by Strategic Simulation Inc. So
the Dragonlance freaks can lick their fingers - and buy an Amiga,
as there will be no ST versions of these.
 However,  "Panza  Kick  Boxing",  "Cybercon" and "Cruise  for  a
Corpse" are out already on ST (or will be release shortly).  U.S.
Gold  is still doing Lucasfilm games as  well,  and  Mr.  Douglas
Glenn (direct of Lucasfilm in the US) informed me that they  will
soon be doing "Secret Weapons of the Luftwaffe" on ST.  This game
is highly popular in the PC circuit,  so it's another simulation.
We'll have to wait a couple of months for it, though.

System III

 No  doubt  the  most beautiful female I have ever  seen  in  the
software business was located at the System III stand and she was
called  Rebecca Cale (I guess you're not interested in that  but,
hey, you know me and my verbal exhibitionism).
 I  had a talk with Marc and Adrian Cale (it's a bit of a  family
business  there)  and they informed me that we can  soon  rejoice
because of the release of "Last Ninja III" (after "I",  "II"  and
"Remix"). Let's hope it'll be good.
 Hardly  being  able  to  keep my eyes  from  wondering  at  this
stunningly and eye-blindingly gorgeous Ms.  Cale,  I was given  a
brochure from which I could distil that the following titles will
be done on ST:  "Myth" (a 'deep' platform game,  out as you  read
this),  "Turbo Charge" (a racing game,  September), "Silly Putty"
(a unique game concept with blobs and organical matter and stuff,
October), "Changeling" (a game where you can have different forms
of  being in a platform surrounding,  September),  "Vendetta"  (I
like  the  sound of this arcade adventure with  puzzle  elements,
September)  and  "Constructor"  (something  strategic  with  real
estate).
 I  could  not resist casting another firm  glance  at  Ms.  Cale
before I left for the next booth.

Mirrorsoft

 Ms.  Cathy  Campos  (whom I seemed to have met about  dozens  of
times in my Thalion period) received me here, and lured me into a
secluded cabin with a thick press release she would be going over
with  me.  Upon her question I had to inform her that I  was  now
once again on the 'wrong side of the fence' after having done for
Thalion what she still did for Mirrorsoft.  Now I was the  press.
She was the prey (if you know Cathy, this is a rather interesting
way of thinking about her).
 At  the  moment,  Mirrorsoft has five labels:  Mirror  Image  (a
budget  label  that  tries to gain some extra  mileage  from  old
releases),  Imageworks,  Cinemaware,  PSS,  Spectrum Holobyte and
FTL.
 By now, Mirror Image should have re-released "3D Pool", "Carrier
Command", "Xenon II", "TV Sports Football" en "Sky Chase".
 Imageworks, after the recent success of "Predator II" and "Brat"
(the latter being their first decent game since "Xenon II" if you
ask me),  will do another game about those filthy tortoises  with
Ninja  tendencies in "Turtles 2 - The Arcade  Game".  Let's  hope
this  will  be  no  other revamp of an  existing  game  like  the
original  "Turtles"  (which  was  a  very  bad  game  that   sold
tremendously  well  because  kids just  happen  to  like  Teenage
Turtles).  We're talking about the end of 1991 here, around which
time  we should also see the release of a strategy game with  RPG
elements  called  "Drop Soldier".  Further to  be  expected  from
Imageworks   are  "Duster"  (business  simulation   with   arcade
elements), "Robozone" (horizontal shoot-'em-up), "Fire & Ice" (an
ancient name,  but now for an arcade platform game by  Craftgold,
the  people that also did "Rainbow  Islands"),  "First  Samurai",
"Cisco  Heat" (racing game),  "MEGA-lo-MANIA" (play God from  the
summer  of this year on),  "Legend" (RPG) and  "Devious  Designs"
(puzzle game).
 Cinemaware  nor Spectrum Holobyte and FTL are releasing  any  ST
games.  The latter are concentrating on "Dungeon Master" for  the
PC (that will finally make these frustrated people happy).
 PSS,  the last label, will release "Red Phoenix Rises" (military
simulator based on the book "Red Phoenix"), "Reach for the Skies"
(WW  II  flight  sim) and  J.R.R.  Tolkien's  "Riders  of  Rohan"
(strategy game).

ZERO

 I  was overjoyed with happiness upon the discovery of  a  "ZERO"
booth at the show.  Finally I could shake hands with the people I
admire,  although  Lord Lakin wasn't present and I only caught  a
glimpse  of  Macca (but then again he's not the  sort  of  person
you'd  want  to meet).  I could finally get my hands  on  one  of
those neat black ZERO watches (with recently reduced price  tag),
and complimented them in a seemingly endless way.
 (By the way,  less then a week later,  I accidentally dropped my
precious ZERO watch from about half a metre height. Obviously, it
wasn't  shock-proof....May  it RIP.  Wreaths can be sent  to  the
correspondence address)

Electronic Arts

 For the last four years,  Argonaut's Jez San (programmer of both
"Starglider"  games) has been sweet-talking the press with  tales
about  his forthcoming battle flight sim that is supposed  to  be
better, quicker and more accurate than any of those on the market
currently  (as well as those that will come in the  decennium  to
come). He usually demonstrates the thing on a 20 Mhz Amiga.
 The ST version is now really (finally, really, honestly) set for
a release date at the end of this year  (yes,  1991,  honestly!).
The name,  which used to be "Hawk",  has in the mean time changed
to "Birds of Prey".  Nothing of it could be seen except for  some
rather  ordinary 3D-game-type screen shots.  Let's pray  that  it
won't  be a letdown,  and that Electronic Arts will still  get  a
meagre  profit out of a game that has already cost them 3  years'
pay for 10 people at Argonaut (who tend to drive big cars on  top
of that).
 Maybe they have a chance of survival with the money they'll make
off "Zone Warrior", a platform game that's due for release as you
read this (if you're reading this in July 1991, that is).
 Electronic Arts is also going into the console market.  I wonder
why  they do this?  I always thought there was no future  in  the
console market? They must be pretty daft then (or not, Willi?).

Bitmap Brothers

 After having caught a glimpse of them at the award 'ceremony'  I
could finally have a chat with them on Monday. Remarkably enough,
they  still recognised me - even though I had seen them  for  the
last  time  on  the  Amiga  Show  in  Cologne,   November   1989.
Incredible. Or were just just acting to know me?
 Anyway,  I  was now able to meet a third Brother by the name  of
Sean Griffiths (the programmer of "Magic Pockets").  He's quite a
nice chap,  too, and remarkably modest. Mark Coleman, once again,
was  nowhere to be seen - although they were happy to  inform  me
with  silly smiled plastered on their faces that he had  been  at
the booth on Sunday. Drat!
 Their latest product,  "Gods",  will be marketed by Renegade and
distributed by Mindscape (or was it the other way  around?).  The
graphics  (by Mark Coleman) are like a dream.  They also told  me
that  "Magic  Pockets"  (a  platform  game  with  equally   brill
graphics) should be due out in September this year.

Domark

 Domark  had opted (just like Mirrorsoft a.o.) for a  hospitality
suite away from the smaller booths. Apparently, business is going
well as it was hellishly crowded there,  and we had to wait to be
served  (but at least we could eat and drink something -  how  do
you call those tiny black balls that are fish' eggs?
 But  we  left  the suite with a  press  release  announcing  the
release   of  "Thunder  Jaws"  (something   involving   swimming,
platforms  and  rescueing  beautiful  girls  in  bikinis),   "Pit
Fighter" (set for October),  "Race Driving" (the sequel to  "Hard
Drivin'"),  "R.B.I.  Baseball  II",  "Skull  &  Crossbones"  (out
already,   and  of  meagre  quality).   "Hydra"  (see  "Skull   &
Crossbones"),  "Super Space Invaders '91" (October),  "Nam  1965-
1975" (historic simulation) and "3D Construction Kit" (which  is,
remarkably,  a  3D  construction kit that is probably out  as  we
speak).
 Domark is also starting a budget label, called Respray. Games to
be republished here are "Xybots",  "T.P.  II",  "Dragon  Spirit",
"Klax",   "Escape  from  the  Planet  of  the  Robot   Monsters",
"Cyberball" and "Castle Master".

John Phillips

 Mr. Phillips, author of "Nebulus" among others, was also roaming
around  at the show.  He also still remembered me (I felt my  ego
grow there).  I am afraid,  however,  that we lost him in the  ST
world. He will no longer do ST games and will instead concentrate
on the Sega Megadrive.
 Worra pity. So there goes "Scavenger"...
 I wonder why John does this. Everybody keeps on telling me there
is no future in consoles (eh, Willi?)...

Ubi Soft

 I  like Ubisoft,  probably because of a very pretty French  girl
with  a  gorgeous  accent by the  name  of  Marie-Therese  Cordon
working  there,  who  insist on kissing when shaking  hands  (she
caught me quite by surprise there).  I knew her already,  as  she
was  the  person responsible for Thalion marketing when  I  still
worked there.
 They  are not doing anything themselves,  but will publish  some
titles for smaller labels:  "Music Master" (a music program  that
also  allows MIDI input),  "Pro Tennis Tour 2" (a tennis game  by
Blue Byte),  "B.A.T." and "Unreal".  On the Amiga, the latter two
titles already gained high acclaim.

Sierra-on-Line

 No presence of Al Lowe, but only people of the UK branch of this
infamous company.  We all know by now that they have  re-launched
"Larry I-III" in a pack at reduced price,  but it was interesting
to  get  to  know that they intend to launch "Larry  V"  as  well
(there will be no "IV", as Al Lowe swore never to do that).
 Anyway.
 Some day this year,  they will make ST owners happy with  "Space
Quest IV",  "King's Quest V",  "Codename:  Iceman" and "Colonel's
Bequest".  What  a shame that they tend to do games on  PC,  port
them to the Amiga and some day do them on ST (if we're lucky).

Active Sales & Marketing

 Of course,  nobody of you will ever have heard of this  company.
However,  this is a marketing organisation that distributes  some
smaller  labels  - like Novagen and that fabulous  little  German
company called Thalion.
 Novagen  has released "Encounter",  the 16-bit version  of  Paul
Woakes' programming debut (now already 7 years ago). It suffers a
bit from looking like a moderately revamped 8 bit title, but will
surely be fun to the old fans.
 Thalion is almost finished with "Ghost Battle".  Though I didn't
hear  anything about "Trex Warrior" (a 3D vector graphics  shoot-
'em-up),  "Amberstar" (a RPG) and "Tangram", I suppose I can tell
you that they will soon market those as well.

Elite

 Elite is also planning to release quite some titles, these being
"Last Battle" (hack'n'slash, June), "Paperboy" (September - at 10
quid),   "European   Championship   1992"   (soccer,   November),
"Commando" (at 10 quid in November),  "Caveman Ninja" (December),
"Suzuka  GP/Winning Run II" and "Edward Randy".  The  latter  two
titles,  however,  can  not be expected to be ready until  spring
1992.

Electronic Zoo

 Mr.  Jonathan Kemp of Electronic Zoo also still recognised me of
my  Thalion  days when we worked for Ubisoft at the Salon  de  La
Micro (November 1990).  After bestowing upon me a pluche  monkey,
he  revealed  that they will be releasing a budget  label  called
"Monkey Business" ("Software For Peanuts" - nice slogan).  Nice -
and original (or is it?)!  They will be doing titles at 8 pounds,
and titles are "Paris Dakar", "Junglebook" and "Asterix".
 On  the full price field,  however,  they've been busy as  well.
They'll  do  "The Ball Game" (puzzle game for up to  4  players),
"Eco  Phantoms"  and  "Germ  Crazy".  Especially  this  last  one
seemed  fun,  where you have to rescue a chappie lying on  a  bed
from  attacks by viruses.  Something tells me I'm bound  to  like
this.

Digital Integration

 This  company has started a budget label  (surprise  surprise!),
which is called Action 16 and which has price tags from 4 (!)  to
8 pound.  Some titles are "Maya",  "Hostages",  "Rotor",  "Cosmic
Pirate",   "Targhan"(*),  "On  Safari",  "Fastlane",  "Sherman  M4",
"S.D.I.",   "Colorado",   "Kult"(*),   "North  &  South"(*)   and
"Gridrunner"(*).  The  games I marked with (*) are  really  good,
actually. Remarkable.

Starbyte

 This relatively unknown German software house is planning a lot.
Titles include "Zero" (cute platform game), "Spirit of Adventure"
(RPG),  "Hannibal" (military/economical simulation which just may
have something to do with elephants), "Soul Crystal", "The Return
of Medusa" (sequel to "Rings of Medusa"),  "Warrior of  Darkness"
(arcade  adventure),   "Rolling  Ronny"  (arcade  platform  game,
September) and "Winzer" (business simulation involving wine,  due
in August).

Storm

 Storm is a new label of The Sales Curve,  people who are know to
frequently  cooperate with Virgin Mastertronic.  Titles  due  for
release are "Big Run" (rally race simulation,  November) and "Rod
Land" (cute platform game they claim to be like "Bubble  Bobble",
September).

 Apart from David Whittaker, Jeroen Tel (who is now working full-
time as a music programmer at Probe) and a few German friends who
I met at the show,  that was about it. After a hasty gathering of
press people at about 2 PM on Monday (where we tried to  convince
the organisation of revising the rules to next year's awards), we
hopped off back to the tube on our way to Heathrow.
 My  attaché  case  was filled to the brim and  could  barely  be
closed.  Of  course,  British customs at Heathrow  insisted  upon
looking through every single item present (that's the way they're
brought up,  I suppose). Anyway, at least things weren't as tough
on me at they were on Douglas Adams in Zaire (read his book "Last
Chance to See..." and you'll understand).
 The flight home was much quieter.  I got home at about 10 PM and
went  to bed quickly where I fell promptly in a  deep,  dreamless
sleep.

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.