Skip to main content
© Dyno

 "Good evening ladies and gentlemen.  Tonight I feature a special
interview  with Mr.  Paul Caruso about the dodgy subject of  'are
there, or are there not flying saucers.'
 Good evening Mr. Caruso. Could you tell us your regarded opinion
about  this  nonsense  regarding  space  travel,  or  even  space
PEOPLE?"
 "Well,  you can't believe everything you say and hear,  can you?
Now if you'll excuse me, I must be on my way."
         Excerpt "EXP" by Jimi Hendrix (from "Axis Bold As Love")


             SOFTWARE REVIEW: LLAMATRON BY LLAMASOFT
                      by Richard Karsmakers

 "I  was  slowly suffocating.  I could barely see  a  glimpse  of
light above me,  way out of reach.  All I could see were  strange
items crashing down on me,  as if desperately wanting to  prevent
me  from as much as thinking of reaching out to that light -  the
light  I  treasured and adored,  the light I needed  to  continue
living.
 Yet  I  sank deeper and deeper,  until I thought my  ears  would
burst and my mind would implode.  Vague memories I recalled,  but
they  could not soften the feelings of suffocation and  potential
death that were threatening my being.
 I tried to breathe but it only filled my lungs,  yes,  my entire
being, with the items that leapt down at me. I saw the glimpse of
light  decreasing.  It slowly disappeared until there was  barely
anything discernible.
 Thinking back of the beautiful things in my life,  I let  myself
sink deeper.  My lungs burst.  My mind shrank. Julia. Heavy Metal
Music. Super Gridrunner. Lemmings...
 None of it would remain where I was to go. None of it. I wept at
the thought, writhing in grief, but the tears were beaten away by
the items that kept on crashing down on my acheing body, reducing
my heart and soul to slush.
 How I had loved life,  but it would never be the same again... I
felt my life force flow away, drained into the vortex below me.
 I spitted.  I even tried to vomit. But there was no stopping the
continuous stream down my throat,  into my lungs, through my very
pores.
 "Indiana Jones," I read aloud whilst swallowing, "Ghostbusters!"
 A thousand licensed titles dug into my flesh,  straining to kill
my last attempt at resistance.
 I  looked around and saw Men In Suits.  Horrible  suits.  Folded
neatly. Ties.
 They  would  probably drag my lifeless corpse  away  soon,  smug
smiles plastered across their faces.
 "NOOOO!!" I cried with all strength I had left.
 Nobody  heard me except for the Men In Suits.  And they did  not
heed my desperate calls.
 They already started to smile.
 Then, "Super Monaco Grand Prix" hit me straight straight through
the heart.  A U.S.  Gold marketing director stifled a chuckle.  I
saw all colors and none for a brief instant,  then I felt  myself
fade away as Turtles washed over me..."

 Gene  closed the book and put down his quill when hearing  quick
steps on the stairs,  suddenly opening his senses to the sound of
children playing in the street before the apartment building.
 Instinctively,  he  sensed  the  person  climbing  those  stairs
would...
 A soft knocking on the door.
 Julia.
 He  tried  to walk past the Screen to the door  as  casually  as
possible,  probably  betraying  more than he would  have  had  he
dashed for it. It was indeed Julia.
 "I  told you never to see me here," he whispered,  "the  Thought
Police is always alert, you know that."
 She glanced back over her shoulder,  as if she expected  someone
there. Hurriedly, she closed the door behind her.
 "Julia..."
 "Be still, Gene" she said, "I had the Screen turned off."
 "How..."
 "Doesn't matter," she replied,  "it just is.  I know someone  at
the Department."
 He seemed to relax,  but knotted muscles still betrayed a  sense
of  awareness.  He felt odd.  Why was she here?  Why  hadn't  she
waited  'til the evening,  when meeting him in the park would  be
much safer?
 It appeared as if she had read his mind.
 "I  can't  be in the park tonight,  and neither  can  you,"  she
checked  the screen to see if it was really  switched  off,  then
continued, "there's a Meeting this evening. At Jonathan's."
 Eager fires sparkled in Gene's eyes. "A Meeting? Tonight?"
 She nodded.
 The  sound  of  the children  playing  outside  had  ceased.  He
suddenly became aware of that.  She heard it, too. He ran towards
the window,  carefully parting the curtains slightly to allow him
to cast a glimpse on the street below.
 Together  with the increasing sound of marching feet,  he saw  a
Squadron  of  uniformed men come around the  street  corner.  The
sound of their boots was threatening on the cobbles,  which  were
still wet with the early morning's drizzle.
 He hurriedly closed the curtains again.
 "Thought Police!" he rasped, "Were you tailed?"
 She  shook her head,  but it seemed as if she wasn't  completely
sure.  "Maybe  it's not us they want," she said,  "maybe  someone
else..."
 "Silent," he interrupted her, daring another look through a tiny
opening between the curtains.
 He looked intently at what was developing in the street.
 One  of  the Thought Police officers had halted in  front  of  a
house on the other side of the street.
 "You're right," he said, sighing in mute relief, "it's not us."
 He opened the curtains wide. She came to stand next to him.
 "It's  the...Tails...Tolers...whatever  they  are  called,"  she
observed  with a voice of incredulity,  "who would  have  thought
they..."
 "Who would think it of us?" he put bluntly.
 The Thought Police had forced the door open now, and entered the
house.  A shot could be heard. After a while, an officer came out
with three children and a woman, weeping. Another carried a box.
 "Illegal games," Julia whispered.
 Gene nodded slowly.
 At  that moment,  a black car with sirens and  flashlights  came
around the corner, stopping precisely in front of the house where
the officers now stood, holding the woman and her three children.
 Out  of  the  car came a man.  He wore a  tweed  suit  and  tie,
casually glancing around through top fashion glasses.  Around his
wrist was a gold watch. He held a cane.
 The officers jumped in line, saluted.
 "A Man In A Suit," Gene gasped.
 They could see the man inspect the box with games. He took out a
random  disk,  tossed  it back after a  quick  inspection.  After
signalling  the box to be loaded into the trunk of  his  car,  he
turned  his  attention to what seemed to be the youngest  of  the
three children. A little boy, probably not yet 10 years of age.
 A wry smile wrung his lips.
 He  made a casual remark to the woman,  who now started to  weep
even more vigorously,  and seemed to beg the man for  mercy.  She
tried to release herself from the iron grip of the Thought Police
officer.  With a quick move, the Man In A Suit hit her across the
face with the cane.
 His face didn't even as much as flinch.
 Blood appeared from a gash across the woman's cheek. She stopped
sobbing and looked at the man with eyes wide open in fear mingled
with disgust.
 The man put his gloved hand on the thin hair of the boy,  as  if
trying  to soothe the child.  Another Thought Police officer  now
emerged from the house carrying a computer system. Upon a sign of
the Man In A Suit this, too, disappeared in the trunk of the car.
 The  man  asked something of one of the Thought  Police  agents,
after which this officer gave him a gun.
 The Man In A Suit toyed a bit with the gun,  spoke to the woman.
She began to weep again, desperately struggling to get free.
 The man put the gun on the little boy's forehead and pulled  the
trigger.
 Gene promptly closed the curtains. Julia looked shocked.
 The shot reverberated through their minds.
 A  sound  could be heard of a car door slamming shut and  a  car
leaving.  The siren was turned off. The sound of marching growing
distant indicated that the Thought Police, too, was leaving.
 "You'd better call the Department and tell 'em the Screen's  not
functioning," she said, "otherwise they may get suspicious."
 She hurriedly kissed him, opened the door and left.
 Gene sighed deeply,  suppressing an urge to look outside  again.
He went to sit down in the one corner of his room that could  not
be seen by the Screen, picked up his quill and opened the book.
 "October 13th 2004," he read aloud as he wrote down the words.

 It was past eight that evening when he retrieved his coat.
 The Screen was working again, and spilled forth the usual amount
of propaganda,  soaps and advertisements.  He knew that  someone,
somewhere,  was watching him. An eerie feeling of discomfort, and
he still hadn't quite grown used to it.
 It seemed to him as if this afternoon had never really happened.
The air conditioning had made the scent of Julia's perfume vanish
quickly,  and apart from a dark red patch on the pavement on  the
other  side  of  the street nothing indicated  that  the  Thought
Police had ever struck.
 But he could not banish the vision of the Man In A Suit  holding
the  gun to the little boy's forehead,  the sudden sound  of  the
shot that had mercilessly hurled the lifeless body to the  ground
- every detail of sight and sound seemed impaled on his senses.
 He shook his head, hoping that would make it vanish. It didn't.
 Damn them!
 He put up his collar, opened the door and left.
 The  wind  was remarkably chilly.  It tore at his  coat,  as  if
trying to make sure he would notice it.
 The   street  lights  threw  a  disembodied,   eldritch   light,
emphasising  the  dreariness of the slow rain  that  had  started
about half an hour ago.
 He stayed close to the buildings,  melting into the shadows each
time he heard faint steps of other people in the  streets.  There
was  no curfew yet,  but there was a substantial chance of  being
arrested after dark - the Thought Police consisted mostly of  men
that'd  rather  shoot  first  and  ask  questions  later  (if  at
all). And,  of course, Gene would rather not be leading strangers
to one of the Meetings.

 Jonathan's.
 About  three  dozen  people were huddled together  in  a  cellar
beneath a 19th century house.  It was rumoured that the owner  of
the  house was one of the Department people,  one of the few  who
did  not  believe in the System and instead sought to  battle  it
slowly from the inside.  Some rumours even went as far as stating
that  he was one of the top System people,  but nobody knew  that
for certain. He was never present on any of the Meetings.
 Jonathan's  had become a popular place of saviour  for  original
games programmers ever since the Men In Suits had taken over full
global economic power,  instituting a law against the  production
and  use of non-licensed products.  People that had  been  living
software  industry  legends in Pre-Licensed times led a  life  of
renegades  now,  and these Meetings were the only occasions  when
they would be partly like their former selves again.
 A  hushed  silence had passed over the people  gathered  in  the
cellar  when  Gene  related  what  had  happened  that  afternoon
opposite the appartment building where he lived.
 "Pigs," someone said, "they're pigs. Pigs in fancy clothing!"
 Everyone agreed.
 Most  of  the people here were men like Gene  himself  -  young,
refusing to submit to the absurd laws inflicted by these ruthless
Men In Suits;  people who refused to believe that the only viable
products were licensed products,  people who spitted on the names
of "Ghostbusters",  "Back to the Future" and  "Moonwalker".  They
had  all liked the movies,  but the games inflicted upon them  by
the  Men In Suits were of a quality only liked by  mothers  doing
Christmas  shopping - and their children,  who apparently  didn't
know better and probably never would.
 A new load of Originalist games had arrived today, and there was
even  a  new  computer  system with  them.  These  soon  got  all
attention  as  there  were  some really  good  ones  among  them,
including some rather spiffin' original text adventures featuring
a mercenary annex hired gun.
 The  system was installed,  and Gene watched as someone  started
playing a rather nice shoot-'em-up game where you had to  collect
various animals while shooting all kinds of other objects.
 The kid handling the joystick was surely very talented, and when
he had lost all his lives,  after half an hour's playing,  he was
already allowed to enter his name in the hiscore table.
 He  was  at  the top,  having forced the name  of  the  previous
hiscore holder, one "Stu Taylor", down by one entry.
 "Wait!" Gene gasped,  feeling a sudden sense of despair arise in
him, "Taylor! You see that name? Stu Taylor!"
 The whole hiscore list was filled with Taylors.
 Someone  asked him what was the significance of this,  and  Gene
explained:  It was the Taylors who had been struck by the Thought
Police that afternoon.  Not the Tails or Tolers or something. Now
he knew their proper name!
 This system had been theirs.  The games had been theirs. All had
been  confiscated that very afternoon by the Man In A  Suit  that
had murdered the little boy.
 Then there was only one possibility...
 Jonathan!
 Had Julia arrived already?
 There was a sudden noise. Sounds of panic. Frantic movement. The
lights were smashed,  plunging the room in total darkness.  There
were cries.  Some shots.  A sudden,  searing hot pain in his left
shoulder.
 Then everything went black.

 The depth increased.
 The  blackness around him whirled ever downward,  and the  light
that  reached him from the little bright spot far above him  grew
less even as he watched.
 His skin was bruised by the impact of many dark things  crashing
down with an ever increasing vehemence.
 He tried to cry, to grasp out towards that spot of light. It was
as if he felt the rays of light release him, like a rope breaking
with a movie hero hanging on it.
 And this time he knew there was nothing to save him for  falling
endlessly.  There would be no rescuing ledge.  There would be  no
strong arm of another hero snatching him away from certain death.
 He was beginning to lose his senses.  Already,  the light seemed
to be getting more intense,  coming towards him rapidly  although
he still knew himself to be falling.
 There was no mistake now.  The light seemed to come nearer -  up
to the point where his eyes hurt of their brightness even  though
he had closed them.
 Saviour?

 Gene  opened  his eyes,  suddenly aware of a pain  in  his  left
shoulder.  He  felt  with numb fingers,  discovering  a  band-aid
wrapped around it.
 Bits and pieces came back to mind. The shots. The hiscore table.
The sight of a Men In A Suit shooting an innocent child.
 Jonathan!
 His head hurt, too. He must have dropped down on something after
he got what he reckoned was a shot wound in the  shoulder.  There
was a bump on the side of his head.
 He  looked  around to take in his  surroundings.  There  was  no
mistake  about  it.  He was in a prison cell.  A  Thought  Police
prison cell.
 He had always imagined these cells to be dark and damp.  He  had
thought  they would be made of filthy concrete,  dark  grey  with
Originalist  slogans  written  all over them -  some  written  in
congealed blood.
 Reality struck him almost like a physical blow.
 The cell was entirely white,  and seemed to be made of  plastic.
No  spots anywhere,  and no writings either.  The  corners  could
barely  be seen as it was all perfectly white and well lit  by  a
lamp that allowed no visible shadow.  No shadow,  that is, except
for that of his own body that was lying on the ground.
 His clothes, so he noticed, had been changed too. He was dressed
all in black. Except for his face and hands there was no patch of
skin  visible.  The blackness of his clothing  was  complete.  It
seemed to be able to suck up every particle of light cast at  it,
much in the way everything else in the cell seemed to radiate it.
 One  of the walls turned out to have a door in it.  It  was  not
until someone opened it that he actually discovered this.
 This person was dressed in white entirely. Even the visible skin
on hands and face seemed to be preternaturally pale. He could see
by  form  of her body under the tight white suit that  it  was  a
woman.  She  beheld him wordlessly,  oppressing him into  a  mute
silence merely by the way she looked at him in utter disgust  and
haughtiness.
 She  seemed to examine him,  watching every square inch  of  his
body and every line on his face.
 The  invisible  spell  by which she had seemed to  bind  him  to
silence suddenly broke. But by the time he found out he could say
something  she  had already turned  around  and  left,  carefully
closing the cell door behind her.
 A panel in one of the other walls suddenly opened. Behind it was
a Screen. It displayed a message.
 "People don't want to be saved."
 Gene  had  heard of the terrible things that  were  supposed  to
happen  to  people caught by the Thought  Police.  He  had  never
really   believed  them,   but  after  what  he  had  seen   this
afternoon...
 This afternoon?
 How long had he been unconscious? It could have been...
 A new message was displayed on the Screen.
 "It is October 15th 2004."
 Some  basic arithmetics told him he had been out for  two  days.
Two days! Would Julia know? Perhaps she...
 The Screen now displayed someone in a prison cell.  The cell was
entirely white, and the prisoner was dressed entirely in the same
colour as well.  As the camera zoomed in on the person, he saw it
was a female. A girl in her late twenties.
 Julia!
 "Bastards!  Bastards!" Gene shouted at the top of his voice.  He
started to get up, to hit the Screen or find something to hurl at
it, hurl himself at it. A sharp ache in his shoulder reminded him
he'd better not.  His knees gave way so that he sank back to  the
floor, moaning in pain.
 "Bastards..."  he muttered under his breath,  looking up to  see
the picture of Julia in her cell replaced by another message.
 "People are happy."
 What are they trying to do with me? He thought.
 The answer to his question was almost biblical.
 "We want to make you see the error of your ways."
 Now   Gene  remembered.   He  had  heard  stories   of   fanatic
Originalists disappearing,  only to reappear after some weeks  as
if nothing had happened - with the only difference that they were
now Licensists. The Department had its methods to change people's
minds.  Even if it took weeks or months,  they would succeed.  Or
the victim would turn out insane - to be disposed of accordingly.
 Death or Licensism. A brute choice. He thought ruefully.
 The Screen's answer was prompt.
 "Death or Licensism. Your choice."
 Damn it! This screen can read everything in my mind!
 "Death or Licensism. Your choice."
 The machine didn't even bother to react to Gene's  thought.  Why
react to the obvious?
 "I'd  rather  be dead than be submitted to that which  you  call
Licensism!" Gene shouted.
 Swiftly, the Screen displayed another message.
 "As you wish."
 Only  some moments passed,  after which he heard someone  unlock
the door to his cell.  A woman dressed in white came in.  Another
nurse.  In  her hands she held a small tray on which  some  small
bottles were located.  Her hair looked familiar.  And those  eyes
looked like...
 "Julia!" he exclaimed.
 "Gene."  she  replied.  Her  voice and  expression  betrayed  no
emotion whatsoever.
 "What have they done to you?" he asked, "Why..."
 He  felt  the power of speech give way in  mid-sentence  as  she
looked  him straight in the eyes,  binding him to silence by  the
same spell the other nurse had used.
 "We have done nothing to her," the Screen read.
 Gene's eyes spoke to her of fear and infinite sadness,  but  she
had  already transferred her gaze to the bottles - and a  syringe
that she carefully and meticulously started to fill with  various
quantities of the various fluids present in those little bottles.
 He saw her prepare his death.  He found he didn't have the power
to move.  Betrayed by his friends.  Betrayed by the woman he  had
lived to love. Killed by the woman he had lived to love.
 He  looked around,  knowing he would not have much time left  to
do so.  He strained to keep his eyes away from Julia, causing his
eyes to focus on the Screen. There was another message there.
 "What a cruel fate. Better than Licensism?"
 Yes! He thought, Yes!
 But  he felt his heart give way within him.  He himself  doubted
the certainty he had tried to assert with that thought.
 The Screen's analysis was quick and harsh.
 "Sure."
 Was his life worth spending for The Cause? Was he maybe the last
of  the  Originalists  left?   Was  it  worth  dying  an  unknown
martyrdom?
 The Screen still had the same message.  Mute,  but  overpowering
all his senses.
 "Sure."
 He thought back of some of the games he had played.  Had not the
original games been so much more fun than the licensed  one?  Had
he  not  played  many original games much  longer  than  licensed
material?
 Indeed I have!  He could feel a new inner strength,  fuelled  by
the  experience of having played original games.  He knew it  was
worth dying for the Originalist Cause.  And after him there would
always be more Originalists.
 Good games get played anyway.
 He saw the syringe's needle disappear in his arm,  but didn't as
much  as  flinch.   Death  would  embrace  him  -  a  far  better
alternative than Licensism.
 Julia  removed the needle after injecting all the fluid  in  his
veins. Without a word, she turned on her heels.
 Gene's  last  words were nothing more  than  a  whisper,  barely
audible even to himself: "I have always loved you, Julia."
 She didn't look back,  oblivious to the pitiful dying man in the
cellar. She closed the door behind her, not bothering to lock it.
 The Screen went black.
 For Gene, everything went black. For the final time.

 He  had  to strain his eyes in order to see the  vague  spot  of
light now,  so far away and above him now that it seemed  nothing
more than a minute star.  No matter how big the sun might be that
formed  that star,  to him it was minute and it had no  power  to
warm him, nor the power to shed any light on him.
 Pictures  flashed by him.  He could see a ghost holding  up  his
fingers in the form of a "V",  just before it was torn away by  a
Teenage Mutant Hero Turtle,  which was in its turn obscured  from
his view by a giant "Moonwalker" logo.
 He closed his eyes.
 A llama beckoned him.

                              *****

Robotron

 Some of you will be familiar with the game "Robotron" (a game on
8-bit Atari and Commodore 64). In case you are not, please accept
my description that it is "A game in which you have to control an
entity across a screen where you have to collect things and shoot
other  things that have a tendency to touch (and therewith  kill)
you".

Llamatron

 Cult arcade king Jeff Minter of Llamasoft,  has,  like no  other
could,  revamped  this  old idea into a game that can  match  the
trend of bettermorenicer and more playable: "Llamatron".
 Taking  the typical Minteresk approach,  the things you have  to
collect are animals the likes of sheep and cows,  and you control
not  a robot but a llama.  The things that you have to shoot  and
that generally try to collide with you vary significantly (toilet
paper rolls,  cigarette boxes,  Cola cans...you name  it).
  Whereas the old "Robotron" was kinda boring,  Jeff has added  a
whole lot of colours and fancy sonix,  and he has also  succeeded
in  adding a lot of things to the gameplay.  The monsters  do  no
longer 'just' try to equal their screen position with yours,  but
there  are  also  ones that shoot if  you  kill  them  (hedgehogs
shooting some spikes),  evil brains that mutate the beasties  you
have to collect,  frantic fractals that shoot and need to be  hit
many times before they die, and loathsome lasers that kill you if
you  cross  their paths at the wrong times (of  course  there  is
more,  but  I wouldn't like to spoil the fun of discovering  them
all yourself).
 Apart  from  the  many bright colours and  the  brilliant  sonix
(we're talking loads of craftfully digitized effects here in  the
1 Meg version,  more than you can shake a sampler at) there's  of
course the typical "Robotron" explosions that really give you the
idea things are happening.  These explosions look like....well...
just  see for yourself,  and remember those of "Die  Filth"  (the
game-ish  demo  thingy  we had on offer in one of  our  Volume  5
issues).
 Only  having player two press the fire button to start the  game
severely screws up things, so you'd better not do that.

Minter is the BEST

 I think it's pretty obvious that both Stefan and myself are true
Minter  Maniacs.  In  the  times of  "Andes  Attack"  and  "Super
Gridrunner" we already completely freaked out (that was late 1988
or  so),  and the day we visited him during the July 1989  LateST
NEWS Quest was also one of the most enjoyable of the entire trip.
 It  may  therefore be that we are both somewhat  biased  towards
what we think of the Cult Master himself or anything he tends  to
produce.
 However,  it just so happens that most of the things he does are
pretty damn brilliant. I am not talking three data disks of fancy
graphics  here,  or a flippin' magnanimous name attached  to  the
stuff,  but sheer playability,  playing fun and other things that
really count.  I mean functional graphics that are fun to see,  I
mean good sonix that fit the game,  and I mean oodles and  oodles
of gameplay. I don't think I'm biased when I say that Jeff Minter
is one of the best specialists on the field of gameplay, learning
curves and addictiveness.
 "Llamatron" features everything a game should have.  It even has
a nice intro and it saves hiscores. There's a neat tutorial built
in  and it's all in memory in one go (don't know about  the  half
meg version,  though).  It's effectively done from a programmer's
point of view, and even the documentation is clear with the usual
bit of humour.

Shareware

 The  most incredible thing about "Llamatron",  however,  is  the
fact that it is shareware.
 A  shareware  program  is  a program  that  can  be  copied  and
distributed non-commercially as often as you want  (and,  indeed,
as  often  as  possible)  and that will  be  completely  free  of
purchase  costs  up to the moment where you decide to use  it  or
play  it regularly.  On that moment,  you are expected to  pay  a
reasonable  fee,  a so-called shareware  registration  fee.  This
makes  it  worth  the shareware programmers'  while  to  continue
developing more shareware products.
 The  advantage of shareware programs is that you can check  them
out  before you pay anything.  Only good programs will sell  that
way,  and  in the long run only good programs will be  made.  The
user is clearly the winning party there,  whereas the  programmer
doesn't lose anything, either.
 The disadvantage is that you do not get any fancy packaging. But
do  you find it worth to shell out two or three times more for  a
product  with fancy packaging that you have not been able to  use
or play yourself yet?
 The  shareware fee of "Llamatron" is £5.  Upon sending  this  to
Llamasoft you will get a newsletter and "Andes Attack" sent  home
for free.
 With but too few exceptions,  games in the shareware circuit are
not  very good.  They are either overindulgently  unplayable,  or
demos  of a commercial product you'll have to fork out some  dosh
for if you want to play it all.
 "Llamatron"  may  be a but overindulgent,  but it's  a  complete
game,  which  also happens to be darned good.  It's the  kind  of
stuff you would never expect to be available through other  means
rather  than the standard commercial network - with a  price  tag
accordingly.
 I cannot say how happy I am to know that Jeff has done the first
ever good and complete shareware game.  And the incentive towards
registration  (i.e.  paying those five squazoolies) is  surely  a
bonus worthy of your attention!
 This honourable initiative, I reckoned, is worth more attention.
So   that's  why  I  am  setting  of  a  world-wide   "Llamatron"
distribution network. That way, you can see for yourself what the
game  is like,  and you will notice that it is everything I  told
you.
 Al you have to do is send a 3.5" disk with 2 International Reply
Coupons to my address (3 International Reply Coupons if you  live
outside  Europe).  My address is:  Looplantsoen 50,  NL-3523  GV,
Utrecht,   The  Netherlands.  You  will  then  get  the  complete
"Llamatron" package (which consists of a one meg version,  a half
meg version and an interesting document file.

A forthcoming shareware initiative...

 As a matter of fact,  this initiative of doing some really  good
stuff for shareware has lead me to start designing some shareware
utilities,  whereas  Stefan and myself will probably  soon  start
doing a series of rather nice and humourous text adventures. More
about these initiatives will be revealed at a later  stage,  when
the  utilities  have been coded and at least one or  two  of  the
adventures are finished.
 The utilities I plan to launch under the name LAUGHWARE(TM), and
the  adventures  will be released under  the  name  TALEWARE(TM),
which will both be names for specific variations on the shareware
theme.

 But no more about this in this article.
 Exit ST NEWS and play the game yourself!

Concluding

 "Llamatron" is a game that you should definitely never  get.  It
will cost you only some IRC's and a disk,  which you'll get  back
pronto!
 (OK, you're allowed enough time to read the rest of this article
and exit this issue)

Game rating:

Title:                        Llamatron
Company:                      Llamasoft
Author:                       Jeff Minter
Graphics:                     7
Sound:                        8.5
Hookability:                  9
Playability:                  9
Value for money:              10
Price:                        £5
Remark:                       Wonderful! Unbelievable! Playable!

 I  would very much like to thank Jeff Minter for  this  game.  I
will pray to the Gods of Software that you will earn enough money
with this for you to continue doing these wonderful things.
 Hail and limitless praise, Mr. The Hairy! Some day, someone will
make you a Software Saint (if we don't do it before them)!

Software Saint

 Hereby,  the  ST NEWS editorial staff declares that JEFF  MINTER
a.k.a. YAK THE HAIRY is henceforth to be known as SOFTWARE SAINT.
People failing to comply to this solemn statement will have their
armpits  infected  by  the spit of a thousand  llamas  and  their
firstborns slaughtered for use in Showarma lunches!
 We  feel that Jeff Minter's name will forever be echoed  through
the  arcade game programmers' hall of  fame.  Hail,  hail,  hail,
hail, praise, praise, halelu(Cut! ED.)

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.