Skip to main content
© Phenomena

 "When cryptography is outlawed, bayl bhgynjf jvyy unir cevinpl."

                          JAGUAR REVIEW
                       by Casper Falkenberg

 I'm  not really sure how to go about this.  How do you review  a
games console?  You can't do any benchtests,  you can't check out
the  operation system,  you can't talk about the user  interface.
Therefore,  this cannot be regarded as a review as such, but more
as a mixture of first impressions.
 Being  an  Atari dealer myself,  I just had to know  what  Atari
where up to,  when they claimed that they had a 64 bit console on
their  hands.  So I called a few companies in England  that  were
supposed to be stocking genuine European versions of the machine.
It  turned out that none of them had or had ever had any  Jaguars
in  stock.  This was in February and the word on the  street  was
that Atari weren't going to supply the European marked till June.
A few hundred machines had been sold in the UK,  but  apparently,
many of them had been faulty.  There was only one thing to do, if
I  wanted a Jag here and now,  and that was to get hold of  a  US
version - an NTSC machine.  Now an NTSC machine doesn't work with
a  PAL  TV if connected through the aerial socket,  but  using  a
SCART Euroconnector I could plug it into my RGB monitor,  and  it
would work just fine.
 There  was another problem I had to consider before buying a  US
machine,  and that was the question of whether or not Atari  were
going to change the cartridge interface on the official  European
versions  of the machine.  Sega had done this (one interface  for
the  Japanese marked and another for the European),  so it was  a
possibility not to overlook.  I called Atari UK,  and  everything
was  explained.  The  US and European version were  going  to  be
completely  similar  except  for the signal produced  by  the  TV
modulator. Alas, there was no problem.
 Two weeks later, my American Jag arrived...
 I was quite pleased with the box.  It wasn't the standard  white
or brown Atari box with some sparse print in blue,  it was black,
with  a red Jaguar logo and the eyes of the beast itself  staring
right at you. On the back of it, there were screenshots from some
games,  of  which most of them still haven't been  released  now,
three months later!  Under the Atari logo on both sides,  it said
"made  in the the USA".  A very smart move,  as this is going  to
sell  machines  in  the States,  where the  consumers  have  been
flooded with Japanese hardware.  All very nice.  But hey,  what's
this on the side of the box?  What?!?  Do I need a license to use
the machine?  I thought I had bought it and that it therefore was
my property.  Well, guess not. Behold, good old Atari paranoia. I
quote from the side of the box:

------------------------------------------------------------------
IMPORTANT!
READ THIS BEFORE YOU OPEN THE BOX OR BREAK A SEAL!

You must carefully read the following terms and conditions  before
using this product.  By opening this box and breaking a seal,  you
indicate  that  you agree to be bound by  this  license  agreement
between you and Atari Corporation ("Atari").  If you do not  agree
with the terms and conditions of this agreement,  promptly  return
the unopened box with the seals unbroken and proof of purchase  to
Atari or the dealer where you purchased the product.  The purchase
price will be refunded.

LICENSE

The  hardware,   software  and  accessories  ("Products")  include
protected intellectual property rights of Atari,  including  trade
secrets,  patents,  copyrights and trademarks,  pursuant to  which
your right to use Products is limited.
     Atari grants you a limited license to:
     (i) use the Products with authorized software and accessories
     (ii) transfer  the  Products and this  agreement  to  another
          party if the other party agrees to accept the terms  and
          conditions of this agreement.
          You  may  transfer the Products only in  complete  form
          i.e.    including   all   software,   accessories   and
          documentation included in this box.

YOU MAY NOT:

     (i) make backup copies of the Product or parts thereof;
     (ii) rent or lease the Products or parts thereof;
     (iii) copy,  reverse engineer,  disassemble,  modify or  make
           derivative works of the Products or parts thereof.

The license is effective until terminated.  You may terminate this
agreement  at  any  time by  completely  destroying  the  enclosed
Products.  This agreement will also terminate automatically if you
fail  to comply with any term or condition herof.  You agree  upon
such  termination  to destroy the Products  completely.  No  other
license is granted, expressed or implied.

If   any  provision  of  this  agreement  is  declared   void   or
unenforceable  by any judicial or  administrative  authority,  the
remaining  provisions of the agreement shall remain in full  force
and effect.

This agreement is governed by the laws of the place of purchase.
------------------------------------------------------------------

 No way I'm gonna destroy my precious Jaguar!
 You  will  have  to agree with me  that  Atari  have  themselves
covered here.

 Back to the past.
 I  opened the box,  and the Jaguar revealed itself to me in  all
its  glory.  It's  really a slick  console,  very  futuristic  in
design,  very cyberpunk - not because it has all sort of flashing
lights  or knobs or anything.  On the contrary,  it's so  simple,
it's  like  a piece of furniture.  And then  it's  so  incredibly
light.  How did they get all that wonderful hardware in there and
still manage to keep the weight down?  The answer is to be  found
in the box. An external power supply. Okay, I can live with that.
If you buy an American machine, keep in mind though that you will
need a plug converter to use the adapter in Europe.  Fortunately,
I had some plug converters lying around,  and with the aid of two
of them,  it was no problem bringing power to my Jag.  It doesn't
look  very good,  but it works!  The Jaguar is currently  bundled
with the game "Cybermorph".  It's the only pack available,  but I
suppose this is set to change.  There have been rumours of  Atari
wanting  to bundle the Jag with "Alien  vs.  Predator",  but  the
developers seem to be having a lot of problems with this game and
it might not turn out as awesome as everyone expected.  If  Atari
asked  me for advice (why should they?),  I  would  say,  without
hesitation and with a strong American accent:  "Bundle this  here
mean machine with that truly breathtaking game 'Tempest 2000'".
 "Cybermorph" is the only software you get when you buy the  Jag,
and  other  titles  are expensive (around  the  £40-£50  mark  in
Europe), so it will probably be the only software you'll have for
some time!

THE JOYPAD CONTROLLER

 The  Jaguar is supplied with a single analog joypad  controller.
The console has room for one more, but several are possible using
a special adapter.  The joypad has a "thumb controller" like  the
Lynx,  three  major  red buttons used for the  main  gameplay,  a
universal pause button and one named "options".  This,  surprise,
surprise,  is  for  changing  the  standard  setup  in  different
software. Furthermore, there are nine small buttons arranged like
a numeric keyboard. You can reset the machine by holding down two
of these simultaneously.
 An  overlay  for the "numeric keyboard" is  available  for  some
games  (including "Cybermorph"),  showing the functions  of  each
button.  It look really professional. A truly original and clever
idea  that  makes your joypad look different for  each  game  you
play.
 Atari's  joypad controller,  which can be used with the STE  and
Falcon as well,  has been criticized by many.  I don't understand
this. I'm quite satisfied with it. It fits your hands perpectlty,
it  ergonomically correct and altogether it's just a pleasure  to
use. I you have an STE or Falcon, get one and play "Rock 'n' Roll
Clams"  from Caspian Software (or "Multi Briques"  or  "Llamazap"
when it finally becomes available, ED.).

THE INTRO SEQUENCE

 Every  time  the  Jaguar is turned  on,  an  intro  sequence  is
initiated.  If you don't want to watch it,  you can press one  of
the  red  buttons on the joypad to skip it.  It looks  very  good
though,  so you won't be skipping it much in the  beginning.  The
Jaguar  logo  zooms onto the top of the screen accompanied  by  a
very  lively roar.  Then some 3D letters roll into the bottom  of
the screen forming the name "ATARI". A funny little "arcade tune"
is heard.  Last, but not by a long shot least, a rotating 3D cube
appears at the middle of the screen,  texture mapped on all sides
with the digitized true colour image of a real Jaguar.  You can't
help being impressed.

THE CARTRIDGES

 After  the  intro  sequence,  it's on to  whatever  game  you've
plugged  in.  A nice feature is the Jaguar's ability to write  to
the cartridges.  You can configure different standard  paremeters
in  your games like the volume of speech,  music and effects  and
then  your  own  costumised configuration will be  saved  to  the
cartridge,  so it's there when you play the game again.  Like  in
Tempest 2000, "keys" for different levels can also be stored.
Cartridges plug in easily, and they don't fry if you accidentally
don't get them well in - the Jag simply refuses to power up.

TECHNICAL DETAILS

 All the technical details mentioned in the first hidden  article
in ST NEWS Volume 9 Issue 1 seem to be correct,  so I'm not gonna
repeat them in detail. You'll have to find them yourself.
 The  CPU of the Jag is actually an old Motorola 68000,  but  all
the exiting work is done by the two custom chips,  Tom and Jerry.
Tom is the 64 bit RISC graphics processor and Jerry is the 32 bit
DSP which is used exclusively for sound and communications in the
Jaguar.  The communications being whatever will be possible using
the DSP interface.  Except for the latter,  the two joypad ports,
the cartridge interface and the TV modulator connector,  the only
other interface is the scart video interface.

JUST HOW GOOD IS IT?

 I  have  only been able to test two pieces of  software  on  the
Jaguar. These are "Cybermorph" and "Tempest 2000", and what can I
say?  I'm impressed,  take a look at my review of "Tempest  2000"
and  you'll see that it oozes enthusiasm.  But two  games  aren't
really  that much to go by.  The Jaguar is capable of  much  more
than games, and with the forthcoming release of a CD-ROM unit, we
will probably see other kinds of interactive software.  One thing
is certain.  The Jaguar can handle 3D graphics.  Although neither
of the games show what the Jag can do with texture  mapping,  the
speed of both games,  especially "Cybermorph",  is amazing. Never
have vectors so big moved so fast!
 In the sonic department,  the Jag scores as well.  I have  never
heard such crystal-clear digitized speech in any other game as in
"Cybermorph", and it's being replayed, right there in the heat of
the  action  at a ridiculously high frequency,  and the  Jag  can
handle it all without slowing down because of the architecture of
the hardware.  For a complete description of "Tempest 2000", look
elsewhere in this issue of ST NEWS.

CYBERMORPH

 As  I can only review the Jag by its software,  I'll give you  a
(very) small review of "Cybermorph" as well.
 The game is supposed to resemble a game called "Starwing" on the
SNES.  I  have never played "Starwing" (actually,  I  have  never
played anything on an SNES - or a Sega,  or a PC Engine, or a Neo
Geo,  or...),  but I've seen screenshots,  and I guess that  they
look alike. "Cybermorph" is a 3D shoot 'em up, where you can view
the action from many angles,  where your ship is in the shoot all
the  time,  or you can choose "cockpit view" where you don't  see
your  ship.  You  fly over a 3D landscape,  and your  aim  is  to
collect a number of probes.  When the required number is reached,
you blast off to another planet.  There are some awesome  weapons
available,  like a flame thrower (looks really good), a detonator
that can knock down entire buildings,  heat seeking missiles  and
bombs.  A  radar  tells you where the probes  are.  Some  of  the
hostile crafts can pick up the probes and fly them to a pole that
drains their energy,  which sooner or later makes them disappear.
The pole also appears on the radar.
 All along the way your actions are commented by a sort of female
Max Headroom,  the image of which first flickers and then appears
at the top left corner of the screen.  It looks and sounds great.
Fly into a mountain side, and you will hear: "Where did you learn
to fly?"
 In the intro to the game,  there's even a little morphing thrown
in.
 "Cybermorph"  succeeds in showing off a number of  the  Jaguar's
capabilities,  and  it's  excellent  bundleware.  I  still  think
"Tempest 2000" would sell more machines though.
 I  might do a full scale review of the game,  but I can just  as
well give a verdict now:

VERDICT:

Name:                         Cybermorph
Programmed by:                Attention To Detail (A.T.D.)
Distributed by:               Atari, bundleware
Graphics:                     9
Visual effects:               10
Soundtrack(s):                8
Sound fx:                     10 (mostly because of the speech)
Playability:                  8
Hookability:                  8
Value for money:              Not  applicable  as  long  as  it's
                              bundleware
Overall:                      9
Price:                        Free,   you  just  have  to  buy  a
                              Jaguar!
Manifest:                     Cartridge,  joypad overlay, 12 page
                              manual
Hardware:                     Atari Jaguar (really!)
Comment:                      A  game  to  impress  your  friends
                              with. It's powerful stuff.

JAGUAR CD-ROM

 The  Jaguar  CD-ROM unit is scheduled for release  pretty  soon.
August as a matter of fact.  Rumours say that this isn't going to
happen and, knowing Atari, this is probably right. But it's going
to be exciting.  Atari won't be able to sell the Jaguar as a true
interactive multimedia system unless there's a CD unit available.
I'm looking forward to some serious CD based software as well  as
some great games, but very little has been revealed as yet.

CONCLUSION

 The Jaguar is the best games console available and combined with
a CD-ROM drive,  it'll go through the roof.  It's a machine  with
such  great potential that surely even Atari can't go wrong  with
it.  For  the first time in a long time,  Atari are ahead of  the
competition  again,  not  only  in value for money  but  in  pure
technology.
 Before buying my Jaguar console, I hadn't played a computer game
in  a very long time.  Now I keep coming back.  If  you  consider
buying  a games console,  go for the Jag.  It's really  the  only
right choice.  It's a bit on the expensive side, but what you get
is no less than a real arcade machine in your own house.  If  the
software  support  is great enough,  Atari will  rule  the  games
console  marked.  That's it,  finito.  Now,  go and buy your  own
Jag... 

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.