Skip to main content
© Erik 'ES of TEX' Simon, 1989

      ST SOFTWARE REVIEW: OH NO! MORE LEMMINGS BY PSYGNOSIS
                      by Richard Karsmakers

 I  am  afraid  you may find some bits here that  you  have  read
before,  as  I took some stuff from the "Lemmings" review  I  did
earlier. I did this because the same stuff applies to it, really,
but with the exception that the sequel is even BETTER...


Oh No! More Lemmings

 They  have  done it again - and quickly  at  that.  Just  before
Christmas  Psygnosis  launched  the  sequel  to  their   all-time
greatest  game,  "Lemmings".  Thank God it wasn't  simply  called
"Lemmings  II"  or  something.  No.  It's  called  "Oh  No!  More
Lemmings".
 Never saw such an apt description.
 I  had  no time to do a background novel or so.  I  had  thought
about  doing  one  that was similar to the  "Lemmings"  one  with
another Norwegian being the protagonist (i.e.  Kai Holst),  but I
decided against it.
 Lucky you. Sorry, Kai.

Lemmings

 The  principle  of "Lemmings"  (and,  therefore,  the  "Oh  No!"
sequel)  is actually very simple,  but just difficult  enough  to
make sure it's almost impossible to explain to someone who hasn't
seen it yet.
 The game consists of 5 clusters of 20 levels in one player  mode
(as  opposed to the 4 clusters of 30 levels with  the  original),
plus  an additional 10 levels for two-player mode  (the  original
had 20 two-player mode levels).  Every level is a contraption  of
variedly  shaped  platforms  that  vary from  very  easy  at  the
beginning to positively intricate in the later ones.  Every level
can be five to six screens in width!
 Somewhere  on  each level is a hatch from which  you  will  find
little creatures dropping,  one by one. The speed with which they
fall can vary between a set minimum speed and a maximum speed  of
100  of these creatures per time unit.  These creatures  are  the
infamous lemmings around which the entire game is built up.
 Just  like real lemmings (little creatures that look a bit  like
hamsters  and that are commonly thought to  be  suicidal),  their
computerised counterparts are as daft as a brush.  They will  all
just  walk in the same direction until they bump into  something,
which  will  cause them to turn around until they  hit  something
else again.
 On the other side of a level is,  usually,  a gate.  This is the
exit,  and the target of the game is to get the lemmings  through
that exit.  At the beginning,  only a minor percentage of all the
creatures  have to be saved,  but on higher levels you will  find
that  it often occurs that 100% has to be saved,  i.e.  none  are
allowed to perish. On many other levels only a couple are allowed
to die - so should they have to die they'd better die for a  good
cause!
 To  assist  the lemmings in getting safely to the  exit,  it  is
possible   to   give  a  certain  number  of   lemmings   certain
instructions. This can be done by selecting from several icons in
a  panel at the bottom of the screen with the mouse  cursor,  and
then  clicking  on  the lemming you would like  to  perform  that
particular  action.  Most  instructions can only  be  selected  a
certain  number of times,  and some not at all - this depends  on
each level, where these parameters are individually determined.
 In the beginning, only one type of action can be selected, which
serves to teach you exactly what you can do.  In the last levels,
you  will have only a precise amount of certain actions  at  your
disposal - so there can be no wasting there!

The instructions

 CLIMB
 Once  given this instruction,  a lemming can climb objects  that
would normally cause it to bump and turn around.
 FALL
 Lemmings  are allowed to fall quite a distance,  but  once  this
gets  too big they drop dead.  By giving them an  umbrella  icon,
they  can drop endless.  If you give them an umbrella as well  as
the climb icon, the lemming becomes an athlete.
 STOP
 The  lemming  that is given this  instruction  will  immediately
stand  still and stop all its buddies (who will bump into it  and
turn  around).  This is the way to prevent them all from  falling
into a chasm, for example. The disadvantage of a stop instruction
is  that  the lemming will have to be exploded to get rid  of  it
(which causes it to die, of course).
 EXPLODE
 The  blowing  up is done with this.  Apart from getting  rid  of
stoppers, you can also use it to have lemmings explode themselves
through  things  like floors or walls,  which is  needed  on  the
higher levels where you might have no diggers as your disposal.
 BUILD STAIRS
 As lemmings will die when dropping into water,  lava or  boiling
acid,  they have to build stairs to bridge gaps.  Deep chasms can
also be conquered this way.  When given this option,  the lemming
will start building diagonal stairs.  After a while it will  stop
(when  it  runs out of bricks,  builds into a wall or  bumps  its
head) and shrug.  You can then quickly let him continue to  build
by giving him the same instruction again. A nice use for building
stairs:  When  you want a lemming to stop digging before  it  has
reached  clear  air,  you  can have it build  stairs  -  it  will
promptly hit something,  causing it to stop building. And by then
it has already stopped digging!
 DIG HORIZONTALLY (BASHER)
 When  a  wall  blocks your way (one that is not  made  of  steel
through which you cannot dig!) you can have a lemming dig its way
through this using the 'dig horizontally' command. There are also
walls  that you can only dig through in one direction  (which  is
usually not the one that you're heading for...).
 DIG DIAGONALLY DOWN
 The  lemming  will start digging a way diagonally down  using  a
pickaxe - until it runs into clear air.
 DIG STRAIGHT DOWN
 The lemming will start digging straight down until it runs  into
clear air.  Watch out: It may not dig too deep, as other lemmings
falling in it will then fall to death!

An example

 On one of the earlier levels there is a horizontal wall on which
the lemmings fall at the left side. The exit is on the right side
and all lemmings start walking towards it.
 Unfortunately  there's a hole in the middle,  over which  stairs
have to be built to avoid them from falling through.
 You will notice,  when one lemming starts building stairs,  that
the  others will continue walking.  They will also walk over  the
stairs even when they're not yet finished,  causing them to  drop
down  and die.  This can be solved by letting the  first  lemming
after  the stairs-builder become a stopper.  The rest  will  bump
into that one and turn around.
 Crikey!
 There is nothing on the left side of the horizontal wall against
which they can bump and turn around,  which means they will  drop
down there and die anyway! So another stopper has to be activated
at  that  spot (any spot left of the entrance hatch  and  to  the
right of the edge).
 The lemmings will now peacefully stroll to and fro between  both
stoppers until the stairs have been finished.
 You now have to blow up the right stopper so that they will  all
walk  over  the stairs,  safely towards the exit  gate.  When  no
lemmings  are walking to the left anymore,  you can blow  up  the
left stopper.
 That's all folx.

Nuke 'em

 The  above was only a simple example.  The final levels are  far
more  complicated,  where  you'll  have to  build  and  dig  with
specific lemmings simultaneously, and keep an eye that they do it
properly.  The  time limits also have a tendency of getting  very
strict.
 For the purpose of getting rid of situations out of which you'll
never  get with the proper amount of  lemmings  saved,  Psygnosis
have included another icon in the instruction panel.
 It contains the picture of a small nuclear explosion.
 Double-clicking  on this will cause every single lemming on  the
screen  to  get  an explosion countdown,  which  causes  them  to
explode  quite  spectacularly  as if in a  huge  chain  reaction,
blowing up their surroundings and everything. Nice to see.

Hooked again

 Connected with this game came what could have been the first and
most  crushing  disaster  of  my  University  carreer:   It   was
delivered  to  me  home in the middle of me  having  to  do  some
serious studying for my pre-Christmas tests.  As a matter of fact
it appeared before the day on which I had to do tests on  General
Literature Science and Grammar.
 It  was  extremely  hard to keep my fingers  off  the  game  and
continue studying that day...
 Once  I could start to play it struck savagely.  All I could  do
was play it.  I saw little green'n'blue creatures walking on  the
insides of my eyelids when I was asleep.  I woke up in the middle
of night, seeing hundreds of 'em crash down ravines and the like.
 As  a  matter  of fact,  I barely had time to  write  the  other
reviews that had to be done,  or even to celebrate Christmas  and
New Year like I should.
 Thanks, Psygnosis (really, though)!

Technically speaking

 In spite of the system with passwords (by the way, you also have
to  type in the xth number on page y of the manual to be able  to
play),  that  makes sure that you're not going to  play  finished
levels again and that makes sure you'll never play the game again
once  you've completed it,  the game doesn't lose  any  long-term
interest.  The  higher levels take very long  to  complete,  even
though  the  hours spent puzzling fly by as if they  merely  were
minutes.
 Technically the game is also OK.  The sound has improved a  lot
since the original;  they use a better sound play routine and the
game sound are also more clearly distinguishable.  The intro  has
been completely skipped.
 Even when about 100 lemmings are strolling leisurely across  the
screen, many of them doing particular jobs, the game doesn't slow
down  too much.  DMA design has done an OK job here.  The  actual
design is OK as well, with minimum loading times.

Two player mode

 As  briefly mentioned before,  "Lemmings" also contains  a  two-
player mode.  We're talking split-screen simultaneous  two-player
mode here,  so no dumb stuff with two people that are supposed to
play after each other.
 Both players play in the same level, and the target is to get as
much lemmings as possible through your own exit gate (each player
has  his own exit gate).  Of course,  you should try to get  more
than  half  of those that actually exit,  so you  can  beat  your
opponent.
 Unfortunately,  the ST does not support two mice and that is the
only  drawback  of the ST version as opposed to  the  Amiga  one:
Player  number  two  has  to play the  game  with  the  joystick,
which needs quite a lot of getting used to. This takes quite some
getting used to, and succeeds in decreasing the two-player mode's
appeal quite a bit.
 Since  the two-player mode is split-screen,  each player  has  a
smaller  screen area at his disposal,  which often means that  he
starts  to scroll when coming too near to the edges when this  is
not wanted. The fact that there is no possibility to speed up the
arrival of the lemmings is also somewhat tedious:  When you  have
finished making your path is can take a long time of waiting  for
all your lemmings to finally arrive.
 If  you  really  compete in the two-player  mode,  the  game  is
downright frustrating. All you need to do is put a stopper on the
way  of  your  opponent,  or blow  his  stairs  to  bits.  Really
aggravating,  and you have to have a good bond of friendship with
the second player not to smack him in the face regularly.

To data disk or not to data disk

 For  people  who already have "Lemmings",  it is not  needed  to
shell  out  the £25.99 required to get the full  version  of  the
sequel.  If  they are satisfied enough with the sound of the  old
version (which I suppose will be the only difference then),  they
can get a data disk at £19.99.
 However,  I  would  advise shelling out another  fiver  for  the
better  sound  and  generally  for  supporting  the  authors  and
Psygnosis more so that they may be tempted to do more Great Games
like these in the future.

Concluding

 Please  refer to the "Lemmings" review that appeared in ST  NEWS
Volume 6 Issue 2.  I still think very much the same.  The  levels
are new and more difficult (except for the first 20,  of  course)
and the intro has been skipped.  Sound has improved.  That's  all
that's different so it seems. It is still a very good game around
superb design.  You should not beat around the bush and get it.
I refuse to pull open another drawer of beautiful adjectives.
 It's a pity it didn't come out a bit later,  i.e.  in  1992.  If
this would have been the case it would surely have been the  best
game of 1992.
 This game will also appeal a lot to people who played "Lemmings"
before.  There  are other surprises (i.e.  Lemming  Tomato  Sauce
makers) and it's just better.

Game Rating:

Title:                        Oh No! More Lemmings
Company:                      Psygnosis
Graphics:                     8
Sound:                        8.5
Playability:                  10
Hookability:                  10 (to the point of frustration!!)
Value for money:              10
Overall rating:               10
Price:                        £25.99
Hardware:                     Colour monitor, DS disk drive
Remark:                       Just downright great. But very
                               difficult!!

 I'd like to extend the warmest greetings and thanks to  Mr.  Nik
Wild of Psygnosis.  Thank you!  Thank you!  Thank you! Hail thee!
Thank y...(cut! ED.)

Another bit about software ethics

 Maybe you have read my article about "The ST's Death" in ST NEWS
Volume 6 Issue 1. Maybe you haven't. The article was about piracy
and its serious threat for software on the ST.
 I  would  like to appeal to all you crackers out  there  not  to
crack a game as good as "Lemmings" or it's sequel,  "Oh No!  More
Lemmings".  The  authors deserve their money for this one  (as  a
matter  of  fact they deserve to be flippin' raking in  money  by
now!),  and  I  personally think you should be pinned to  a  wall
hanging by your gonads if you crack it anyway. You do not deserve
to breathe the same air as the people behind this game!
 In case you are just someone who is spreading a cracked  version
of the game, I would like to tell you that I think you deserve to
have your foreskin removed by an exceedingly blunt knife.
 Enough said.

The password (well...at least some of 'em)

 Lucky  you.  In case you already have the game (and  there's  no
rational  reason why you shouldn't) you might have  some  benefit
from the fact that I have already played it for quite a while.  I
am  therefore  in  a  position to supply you  with  some  of  the
passwords.  Sorry I haven't got any more, but I just didn't get a
chance  to play it any more before this ST NEWS issue had  to  be
released.
 I have reason to believe that it is possible that there are some
(or,  indeed,  MANY) different sets of passwords - just like with
"Gods"  or the earlier "Lemmings".  So don't start swearing  when
these don't work.  Try replacing specific characters with others.
It might help.
 Note:  Levels  with an asterisk (*) behind them  are  particular
b*stards!  Levels with a video hash (#) behind them are extremely
simple if you just use your eyes properly!
 Second note: Tim (Manikin of TLB) initiated the 'wicked' levels.
Thanks  for  that.  No  thanks for beating my  poor  and  awfully
faithful mouse mat senseless in the process! Oh yeah, Tim: Please
tell  Dave to start growing up;  he can shove his remarks up  the
least appealing of his cavities (i.e. any of his cavities).

TAME

01-AREYOULAME
02-IHRTDNCCAD
03-LRTDNCADAQ
04-RTDNCILEAJ
05-TDNCAHVFAS
06-DNCIHVTGAL
07-NCALVTDHAI
08-CILTVLJIAF
09-CAHRUDNJAD
10-IHRUDNCKAM
11-MPUDNCALAI
12-RUDNCILMAS
13-UDNCAHVNAL
14-DNCIHVUOAE
15-NCALVUDPAR
16-CILVUDNQAK
17-CAHRTFNBBN
18-IHRTFNCCBG
19-LRTFNCADBO
20-RTFNCILEBM

CRAZY

01-DONTNEEDIT
02-FNCIHTTGBM*
03-NCALVTFHBL
04-CILTTFNIBS
05-CAHRUFNJBG
06-IHRUFNCKBP
07-LRUFNCALBM
08-RUFNCILMBF
09-WNJCEIVNBJ*
10-FNCIHVUOBH
11-NCAMTUFPBD#
12-BMMVWFNQBD
13-CAHPTDOBCL
14-IHPTLKCCCI
15-LPTDOCADCR
16-RVLKCILECS*
17-TDOCAHVFCF
18-DOCIITTGCN
19-OCALTTDHCJ
20-CILVVLKICK

WILD

01-ARJUKIDDIN*
02-MIRWLKCKCK
03-MRWLKCELCH
04-RWLKCMMMCQ
05-UDOCAHVNCO
06-LKCMITWOCQ
07-OCALVUDPCE
08-CILVUDOQCN*
09-CAHRTFOBDQ
10-IHRTFOCCDJ
11-LRTNKCEDDO
12-PTFOCIMEDO

WICKED

01-NOTNESESRI
02-NKCMITWODD
03-OCALVUFPDH

TWO-PLAYER MODE

01-DONTNEEDIS
02-IHPTDKJCKP
03-LPTDKJADKM
04-PTDKJILEKF
05-TDKJAHTFKO
06-DKJIHTTGKN
07-KJALTTDHKE
08-JILTTDKIKN
09-JAHPUDKJKP
10-IHPUDKJKKI

 People  who  are eager to get their hands on  the  passwords  to
"Lemmings" (i.e.  the original game) should get ST NEWS Volume  6
Issue  2  that  contains most of them.  Refer  to  the  "Colofon"
article for your nearest official ST NEWS foreign distributor.
 Bye.

Disclaimer
The text of the articles is identical to the originals like they appeared in old ST NEWS issues. Please take into consideration that the author(s) was (were) a lot younger and less responsible back then. So bad jokes, bad English, youthful arrogance, insults, bravura, over-crediting and tastelessness should be taken with at least a grain of salt. Any contact and/or payment information, as well as deadlines/release dates of any kind should be regarded as outdated. Due to the fact that these pages are not actually contained in an Atari executable here, references to scroll texts, featured demo screens and hidden articles may also be irrelevant.